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(Scientific American)   At an average rate of 200 years or so, California's Central Valley is put under 10 feet of water for six months or so. The last time was in 1862. Climate change might increase the frequency. Such an event could do $700 billion in damages   (scientificamerican.com ) divider line
    More: Scary, California's Central Valley, California, farmland, effective tax rates, Sierra Nevada, American West, lessons  
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5375 clicks; posted to Geek » on 22 Dec 2012 at 10:39 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-12-22 09:51:00 AM  
Good news is, farmers and city dwellers could stop fighting over irrigation for a year.
 
2012-12-22 10:22:46 AM  
Interesting article.

Considering how much the US relies on the agricultural products of the area, the entire nation would be seriously affected. I'd say $700 billion is a very low estimate.

Katrina? What's a Katrina?
 
2012-12-22 10:28:29 AM  
Arrrrrrrgggghhhhhh!
 
2012-12-22 10:34:34 AM  

Amos Quito: Interesting article.

Considering how much the US relies on the agricultural products of the area, the entire nation would be seriously affected. I'd say $700 billion is a very low estimate.

Katrina? What's a Katrina?


Well, I'm not sure this will be noticed since every other region will be dealing with their own natural disasters like extreme drought and heat waves that become "stuck" in the weather pattern for longer than usual.
 
2012-12-22 10:58:46 AM  
Where is snark?
 
2012-12-22 11:02:26 AM  
Headline makes my brain cry or so.
 
2012-12-22 11:06:14 AM  
Then again, it might not.
 
2012-12-22 11:07:18 AM  

cman: Where is snark?


Right here.
 
2012-12-22 11:07:34 AM  
"200 years" is not a rate.
 
2012-12-22 11:07:52 AM  

Bontesla: Amos Quito: Interesting article.

Considering how much the US relies on the agricultural products of the area, the entire nation would be seriously affected. I'd say $700 billion is a very low estimate.

Katrina? What's a Katrina?

Well, I'm not sure this will be noticed since every other region will be dealing with their own natural disasters like extreme drought and heat waves that become "stuck" in the weather pattern for longer than usual.


Indeed, but people tend to take notice when food becomes unavailable.

A flood like that would have devastating affects on the entire nation.
 
2012-12-22 11:11:48 AM  

Bontesla: Amos Quito: Interesting article.

Considering how much the US relies on the agricultural products of the area, the entire nation would be seriously affected. I'd say $700 billion is a very low estimate.

Katrina? What's a Katrina?

Well, I'm not sure this will be noticed since every other region will be dealing with their own natural disasters like extreme drought and heat waves that become "stuck" in the weather pattern for longer than usual.


westernrifleshooters.files.wordpress.com

www.personal.psu.edu

turklishtefl.com
 
2012-12-22 11:20:46 AM  

Amos Quito: Interesting article.

Considering how much the US relies on the agricultural products of the area, the entire nation would be seriously affected. I'd say $700 billion is a very low estimate.

Katrina? What's a Katrina?


Considering this is how good farmland is created, I'd say they should STFU and be happy for the flood. Go build your mansions someplace else.
 
2012-12-22 11:24:57 AM  
Benjimin_Dover:

Considering this is how good farmland is created, I'd say they should STFU and be happy for the flood. Go build your mansions someplace else.


Why would anyone who can afford a mansion build it in the Central Valley??
 
2012-12-22 11:25:20 AM  
Although I won't go so far as to say "Not to worry about it" we've come a long way since the 1860's. Dams have been built, rivers encased in concrete and put on definite courses, houses have been raised, hippies are installing cisterns...

So to say we (Californians) are totally unprepared for devastating flooding is nothing short of fear-mongering.

However, growing up in the tropics where half the year was nothing but rainstorms and monsoons, I can say that you can never really be prepared for the unpredictable nature of floods. Just stock up on emergency supplies, have an evacuation plan ready, make sure your insurance policies are good and hope for the best.
 
2012-12-22 11:37:36 AM  
Not "rate." Rate is speed.

Subby meant "frequency."
 
2012-12-22 11:39:53 AM  

ZAZ: Good news is, farmers and city dwellers could stop fighting over irrigation for a year.


Whiskey's for drinking, water's for fighting.
 
2012-12-22 11:40:47 AM  
FTFA: "The atmospheric river storms featured in a January 2013 article in Scientific American that I co-wrote with Michael Dettinger, The Coming Megafloods, are responsible for most of the largest historical floods in many western states.


WTF? Seriously, if you're going to send new headlines back from the future, at least give me some winning powerball numbers.
 
2012-12-22 11:48:26 AM  
Maybe now they will consider balancing the budget and stop taking federal tax money to cover their losses. I'm not a citizen of california I don't see why I should help foot the bill for them simply because they have never felt the need to get out of their debt or even do the slightest effort by approving a balanced budget.
 
2012-12-22 12:02:48 PM  

RoxtarRyan: FTFA: "The atmospheric river storms featured in a January 2013 article in Scientific American that I co-wrote with Michael Dettinger, The Coming Megafloods, are responsible for most of the largest historical floods in many western states.


WTF? Seriously, if you're going to send new headlines back from the future, at least give me some winning powerball numbers.


Um, magazine publication has a timeline somewhat longer than newspapers, Sparky. That's how he can claim authorship of a piece to be printed in a future issue.
 
2012-12-22 12:04:46 PM  
Flood plains and wetlands...

How do they work?
 
2012-12-22 12:06:09 PM  

midigod: Not "rate." Rate is speed.

Subby meant "frequency."


Subby probably meant that, but that's not what the whole "100-year flood event" is even about, it's the probability of the event happening in any given year. For a 100-year event, that is 0.01. People start freaking out they have a second 100-year flood 10 years later, "But we're not due for another 90 years!"

Statistics, how do they work??
 
2012-12-22 12:14:58 PM  
Flooding Los Angeles might be a good thing compared to New Orleans when it got hit by Katrina.
 
2012-12-22 12:15:42 PM  
Fly Floodover state problem.
 
2012-12-22 12:21:38 PM  

xkillyourfacex: Maybe now they will consider balancing the budget and stop taking federal tax money to cover their losses. I'm not a citizen of california I don't see why I should help foot the bill for them simply because they have never felt the need to get out of their debt or even do the slightest effort by approving a balanced budget.


Oh, we want to, but the politicians and voters have rose colored lenses. Regardless, you should see why you should help foot the bill since California produces most of the nations off season produce, makes the nation's best wine, and the ports are the primary access for all your goods produced in Asia, including electronics, cars, and medicine.
 
2012-12-22 12:26:26 PM  

astro716: "200 years" is not a rate.


At least he didn't say "rate of speed of 200 years"
 
2012-12-22 12:47:13 PM  
or so

OR SO

Or, so now when there is any weather related incident ever, we blame climate change? BRILLIANT!

or so
 
2012-12-22 12:47:35 PM  
Something, something, "arc storm" something something, 300,000 dead, $750 billion in damages. Yeah, I heard this on one of those catastrophe porn shows on The Discovery Channel or something. The chances of this are right up there with mega volcanoes, super-tsunamis, asteroid impacts and killer global pandemic.

just what we need - more fuel for the preppers ideology....
 
2012-12-22 12:48:21 PM  
i6.photobucket.com
 
2012-12-22 12:50:22 PM  

ZAZ: Good news is, farmers and city dwellers could stop fighting over irrigation for a year.


"It is a gift!"
 
2012-12-22 12:51:08 PM  

astro716: "200 years" is not a rate.


..says the person who can't do the Kessel Run in under 20 parsecs.
 
2012-12-22 01:23:37 PM  
"Climate change might increase the frequency."

Subby, in addition to being unable to write a headline, you are also a liar.

There is nothing in the four page article that relates what happened in 1862, or any future megafloods to climate change in any way shape or form.

"Climatic" appears twice in the article. "Climate" appears once in the article. "Climate change" appears nowhere in the article.

fark you subby.
 
2012-12-22 01:38:09 PM  
The meth crop in the central valley is > than the agricultural crop, so having it all get washed away might actually be a net positive for society.
 
2012-12-22 01:45:07 PM  
It's a little known fact that "Sacramento" is derived from a Maidu word that meant "move to higher ground in October"
www.noehill.com
Sacramento, Jan. 1850
 
2012-12-22 01:45:27 PM  

fustanella: ZAZ: Good news is, farmers and city dwellers could stop fighting over irrigation for a year.

"It is a gift!"


It is a gift. A gift to the foes of agriculture. Why not use this flood? Long has my father, the Steward of Gondor Farms kept the forces of famine at bay; by the manure of our cows are your lands kept fertile. Give Gondor Farms the weapon of the famine. Let us use it against it!
 
2012-12-22 02:02:05 PM  
www.moviefanfare.com
"Do you know how cheap that land is now?"
 
2012-12-22 02:03:59 PM  
It's fun to blame known cycles on climate change...
Yay for self-fulfilling prophesies!
 
2012-12-22 02:16:01 PM  

KarmicDisaster: astro716: "200 years" is not a rate.

At least he didn't say "rate of speed of 200 years"



It should be "rate of speed of 200 light years". You're welcome.
 
2012-12-22 02:18:56 PM  
Worst Headline Ever, Seriously.
 
2012-12-22 02:20:41 PM  

Amos Quito: Interesting article.

Considering how much the US relies on the agricultural products of the area, the entire nation would be seriously affected. I'd say $700 billion is a very low estimate.

Katrina? What's a Katrina?


So spend some money on flood control measures instead of being whiny environmentalist victims. There is this place called the Netherlands, where like every second of every day for like forever the entire country was under water. But they got their act in gear, broke a bunch of modern environmentalist laws and poof, they have a nice dry country now.
 
2012-12-22 02:26:50 PM  

Gough: midigod: Not "rate." Rate is speed.

Subby meant "frequency."

Subby probably meant that, but that's not what the whole "100-year flood event" is even about, it's the probability of the event happening in any given year. For a 100-year event, that is 0.01. People start freaking out they have a second 100-year flood 10 years later, "But we're not due for another 90 years!"

Statistics, how do they work??


I own this apartment building that is technically in a flood plain because the cities storm sewers tend to fill up and overflow into this one part of town in a 100 year storm event.....So I have to pay flood insurance on it. The insurance strangely enough worked out to 1% of the value of the house per year. Or about twice the profit I was making on it. SO I lost money for about five years then had a 100 year storm event. The total damage?  I paid a guy $50 to broom the mud out through the garage door. I didnt make a claim. But I did call my city commission and raise hell about it. A month later the Corps of engineers certified that the flood wall half a block away is actually a floodwall and the flood plain is not a flood plain any more. So now I am not forced by idiots to buy flood insurance thank god. So a 100 year event insurance essentially collects from you the value of the house ever 100 years.  Actuarial tables?  We dont need none of that, we just need a calculator to set your rates......
 
2012-12-22 02:30:06 PM  
Get a wave machine and surf it. Lemons to lemonade.
 
2012-12-22 02:30:48 PM  
Neener, neener, neener...my GPS says my house is at 176' MSL. Fark you guys...I got mine!

/in the coastal range...not in the Central Valley
//about 50' higher than our valley's creek
///got 1.25" over the past 24 hours, which was bad enough
 
2012-12-22 02:35:23 PM  

bhcompy: xkillyourfacex: Maybe now they will consider balancing the budget and stop taking federal tax money to cover their losses. I'm not a citizen of california I don't see why I should help foot the bill for them simply because they have never felt the need to get out of their debt or even do the slightest effort by approving a balanced budget.

Oh, we want to, but the politicians and voters have rose colored lenses. Regardless, you should see why you should help foot the bill since California produces most of the nations off season produce, makes the nation's best wine, and the ports are the primary access for all your goods produced in Asia, including electronics, cars, and medicine.


so what you are saying is that after it happens we will be able to grow off season crops other places at a competitive price which will help spread wealth away from the peoples republic of California and into the southern hearthlands....and maybe the US electronics, Pharmaceuticals, and automobile manufacturing industries will sell more cars as the supply of cheap as chips Korean cars is cut off by flooding.

Flood baby Flood.
 
2012-12-22 02:40:54 PM  

Benjimin_Dover: Amos Quito: Interesting article.

Considering how much the US relies on the agricultural products of the area, the entire nation would be seriously affected. I'd say $700 billion is a very low estimate.

Katrina? What's a Katrina?

Considering this is how good farmland is created, I'd say they should STFU and be happy for the flood. Go build your mansions someplace else.


I'm thinking y'all should move to Pheonix, where there is no climate. I'll stay here on my mountain.
 
2012-12-22 02:44:18 PM  
SA prepublished this article weeks ago. I submitted it with a much better headline (no great stretch there, admittedly).


Benjimin_Dover: Considering this is how good farmland is created, I'd say they should STFU and be happy for the flood. Go build your mansions someplace else.



Or just build in anticipation of the inevitable floods. A lot of older homes in Sacramento have stairways leading to front doors on the second floor, with the first floor used for little more than storage.
 
2012-12-22 03:00:51 PM  
Good, Fresno could use a good soak.
 
2012-12-22 03:16:53 PM  

archichris: Gough: midigod: Not "rate." Rate is speed.

Subby meant "frequency."

Subby probably meant that, but that's not what the whole "100-year flood event" is even about, it's the probability of the event happening in any given year. For a 100-year event, that is 0.01. People start freaking out they have a second 100-year flood 10 years later, "But we're not due for another 90 years!"

Statistics, how do they work??

I own this apartment building that is technically in a flood plain because the cities storm sewers tend to fill up and overflow into this one part of town in a 100 year storm event.....So I have to pay flood insurance on it. The insurance strangely enough worked out to 1% of the value of the house per year. Or about twice the profit I was making on it. SO I lost money for about five years then had a 100 year storm event. The total damage?  I paid a guy $50 to broom the mud out through the garage door. I didnt make a claim. But I did call my city commission and raise hell about it. A month later the Corps of engineers certified that the flood wall half a block away is actually a floodwall and the flood plain is not a flood plain any more. So now I am not forced by idiots to buy flood insurance thank god. So a 100 year event insurance essentially collects from you the value of the house ever 100 years.  Actuarial tables?  We dont need none of that, we just need a calculator to set your rates......



I can't count the number of times I have run into this Flood Plain issue in real estate. Somebody's making some real money off of it. One house I bought, they said it was in the hundred year plain, but it was on a hill above all the other houses around it. We got it straight through the County and Corps and didn't have to pay the flood insurance. Then get a notice the next year, that I am in default on the loan for not having flood insurance. The bank didn't care what the Corps or the County had to say, it was on their map so I had to pay. Who is stealing all of this money?
 
2012-12-22 03:18:39 PM  

Gough: midigod: Not "rate." Rate is speed.

Subby meant "frequency."

Subby probably meant that, but that's not what the whole "100-year flood event" is even about, it's the probability of the event happening in any given year. For a 100-year event, that is 0.01. People start freaking out they have a second 100-year flood 10 years later, "But we're not due for another 90 years!"

Statistics, how do they work??


I think Subby also made the Kessel Run in 12 parsecs.
 
2012-12-22 03:35:49 PM  
At least it might have the advantage of washing away the smell of Fresno?
 
2012-12-22 03:42:33 PM  
Right. That'll be the day I move back to Annandale.
 
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