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(Mirror.co.uk)   10 most commonly mispronounced words. One of them is "phenomenon." (♫ do doooooo, do do do ♫) "Phenomenon." (♫ do do do do ♫) "Phenomenon." (♫ do dooooooo, do do do, do do do, do do do, do do do, do-do do do do-do do ♫)   (mirror.co.uk) divider line 59
    More: Interesting, English Words, University of York, Boxing Day, phenomenon  
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18011 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Dec 2012 at 2:35 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Archived thread
2012-12-22 12:46:35 AM
8 votes:
Headline of the year winner right here. My only vote goes to this, because I laughed until I cried.
2012-12-22 03:02:12 AM
7 votes:

Thunderboy: I run into the mispronunciation of "phenomenon" (pronounced "phenomena") a lot - most recently by a Harvard graduate.


phenomenon = singular
phenomena = plural
2012-12-22 02:28:56 AM
6 votes:
2012-12-21 09:55:26 PM
6 votes:
It took you 10 minutes to type that headline subby. Admit it.
2012-12-22 02:56:51 AM
5 votes:
images4.wikia.nocookie.net

The question is... who cares?
2012-12-22 02:06:57 AM
4 votes:

Lorelle: For Americans, the 10 words are:

Mischievous

- Miss chee vee us
Jewelry - Jool ree
Library - lie berry
February - Feb you airy
Kindergarten - Kinder garden
Ask - Axe (seems to be a racial thing, not American)
Sherbet - Sure burt (is also considered correct)
Probably - Prob lee
Nuclear - Nuke you lur
Pronunciation - Pro noun see a shun
2012-12-22 01:43:11 AM
4 votes:
For Americans, the 10 words are:

Mischievous
Jewelry
Library
February
Kindergarten
Ask
Sherbet
Probably
Nuclear
Pronunciation
2012-12-22 01:16:16 AM
3 votes:
Phenomenon, remuneration and statistics have topped a list of the most commonly mispronounced English words.

Speakers also have a problem getting their tongue around ethnicity, hereditary and particularly


Really?  Must be a Brit thing, because I don't know anyone who has problems with those words.  Maybe "remuneration" (I switch the M and N when I say that in my head).  Though I do want to cockpunch people who say "orientate".
2012-12-22 04:29:48 AM
2 votes:
One really common mispronounced word is forte, which is really pronounced like "fort". Of course, if you do pronounce it correctly, people will think you are an idiot.
2012-12-22 03:52:17 AM
2 votes:

Marmilman: how the fark did "York" ever have three syllables? I can't imagine how it must have been pronounced.


York is the current/modern name.

The name Eboracum was turned into Eoforwic by the Anglians in the 7th century : a compound of Eofor-, from the old name, and -wic "village". This was probably by conflation of the element Ebor- with a Germanic root *eburaz (boar); by the 7th century the Old English for 'boar' had become eofor. When the Danish army conquered the city in 866, the name became rendered as Jórvík.[13]

Jórvík was gradually reduced to York in the centuries following the Norman Conquest, moving from the Middle English Yerk in the 14th century through to Yourke in the 16th century and then Yarke in the 17th century. The form York was first recorded in the 13th century.[4][14] Many present-day names of companies and places, such as Ebor taxis and the Ebor race meeting, refer to the Roman name.[15] The Archbishop of York also uses Ebor as his surname in his signature.[16]

/from the wiki
2012-12-22 03:33:08 AM
2 votes:
Aluminum surprisingly absent.
2012-12-22 02:54:27 AM
2 votes:
Let us not judge those who cannot pronounce words. Let us instead pass judgement on those who cannot spell!

:-D
2012-12-22 02:47:18 AM
2 votes:
+1 to subby.
2012-12-22 02:39:25 AM
2 votes:
I'm still trying to figure out what they're saying, if they're saying these words wrong. I don't know if I've ever heard anyone mispronounce any of these.

/to be fair, I don't think I've ever heard anyone say "remuneration," either way.
2012-12-22 01:13:29 AM
2 votes:
well played, submitter.
2012-12-22 03:15:50 PM
1 votes:
What? No theater? How about one that stings my ears in America, forward?

It's FOR - WARD, not foe-werd.
2012-12-22 02:04:17 PM
1 votes:
This thread is amazing. I can't tell who's trolling, who doesn't know what a dialect is, and who's legitimately stupid. It's the most incredible Poe's Law battle royale I've ever seen on Fark.
2012-12-22 01:34:09 PM
1 votes:
The British are terrible at pronouncing words in English.
2012-12-22 11:29:58 AM
1 votes:

santadog: calbert: for those who don't get it:

[images3.wikia.nocookie.net image 300x220]

Sandra Bullock

fyi, those creatures are called Snowths.

/pretty dumb headline, quite a stretch for lame pay-off.

:-/

Actually, it's more about the original.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gsjcb7w1Y-w


yes. which was already linked to prior to my posting. my link was to their own evolution/inside joke about it. even if subby was aware or not.

and this headline has been done here many times before, so no points or dick sucking for subby.
but everybody goes apesh*t over the same repeated headlines over and over.
time stands still here.
2012-12-22 11:10:37 AM
1 votes:
If your from Pittsburg there are a ton of words that are pronounced wrong. If someone asks "Jeet yet?" the answer is "No, Jew?"
/I probly can't go, I have to red up my house.
2012-12-22 10:53:50 AM
1 votes:

Thunderboy: stu1-1: Thunderboy: I run into the mispronunciation of "phenomenon" (pronounced "phenomena") a lot - most recently by a Harvard graduate.

phenomenon = singular
phenomena = plural

Dayglo Brown:

"Phenomena" is the plural form of "phenomenon".

Yes. And that's why pronouncing "phenomenon" as "phenomena" is incorrect. Gold stars for both of you!


They used the wrong word not mispronounced the right word.

It's like saying somebody mispronounced the word "car" by saying "truck."
2012-12-22 10:46:55 AM
1 votes:

Swiss Colony: What gets me all stabby is people who insist on using 'I' when they should use 'me'.


Over-correction. Parents and teachers chide children who misuse "me" so much that people grow up afraid to use it, even in cases where it would be correct.

I can't even think of the last time I heard "myself" used correctly.

Correct: I pleasured myself this morning.

Incorrect: Your mom blew the pool boy and myself this morning.
2012-12-22 09:53:02 AM
1 votes:

Swiss Colony: Orient and orientate have different meanings. Disoriented would surely mean to be removed from the Orient. Disorientated is to have lost ones bearings


"Orientate" is an improper word formation, and its use should be discouraged.

The problem stems from the ability in English to convert verbs into nouns and vice-versa. The proper verb-form is "orient", and its corresponding noun-form is "orientation". People sometimes take "orientation" and mistakenly assume that its verb-form is "orientate".
2012-12-22 09:46:26 AM
1 votes:
Hey! Americans!

It's "soar-ee" not "sari"

Sari is an Indian garment.

/sorry
2012-12-22 09:19:20 AM
1 votes:
What gets me all stabby is people who insist on using 'I' when they should use 'me'.
2012-12-22 08:47:07 AM
1 votes:
I can never pronounce "ask" it always comes out "axed".
2012-12-22 07:52:47 AM
1 votes:

Trixie212: People who say conversate instead of converse make me want to smash my head through a wall.


Next time, try it with their heads and see if they learn faster.
2012-12-22 07:52:33 AM
1 votes:
"Vulnerable" is not "vunnerable"
2012-12-22 07:05:35 AM
1 votes:

omeganuepsilon: It's got that redneck hillbilly stigma.


Now that depends on whether it's used as an adverb or an adjective..

That there donkey over yonder... = Hillbilly

My lady in yonder meadow = British homosexual (NTTAWWT)

Alassra: Pittsburghese is a plague on the English language.


Do people there also "outen the lights"? Or drop "to be", as in "the dishes need warshed"?
2012-12-22 07:00:57 AM
1 votes:

Teela: Realtor - reel a tor


It's pronounced "asshole psychopath lying scum shiatbag".
2012-12-22 06:50:27 AM
1 votes:

ChildOfBhaal: omeganuepsilon: Hand Banana: I've seen quite a few people saying and writing it as prolly and it drives me crazy.

I say "howdy", "yall", "yonder" "prolly", almost as a joke, because language is fun to play with and it never hurts to be ridiculus on occasion. It's when people only speak that way and are incapable of sounding intelligent, that's when it's gotten ridiculous.

What's wrong with yonder? Perfectly good, correctly pronounced word.


Good, not so much.

Yes, it's a valid word, as many are, that people still would rather not use or have said to them. It's got that redneck hillbilly stigma. It's not just the accent, it's the sound of the word. A vast amount of people that say it sound like they don't like to read berks, not even gersberms

i0.kym-cdn.com
2012-12-22 06:38:31 AM
1 votes:
Even though it's correct I don't think I could pronounce forte as fort and I don't know anyone who does. It just sounds weird and hardly anyone would know what you were talking about. I think this is one of those cases where we need to accept that the accepted pronunciation has changed.
2012-12-22 06:16:01 AM
1 votes:

jtown: stu1-1: [img850.imageshack.us image 578x343]

I prefer the original.

[farm9.staticflickr.com image 458x360]


Because no one ever has any clue when I mention the exact same thing:

"Mah Nà Mah Nà" debuted as part of Umiliani's soundtrack for the Italian mondo film Svezia, inferno e paradiso (Sweden: Heaven and Hell [lit. Hell and Heaven]) (1968), a pseudo-documentary about wild sexual activity and other behaviour in Sweden. The song accompanied a scene in the film set in a sauna which gave its original title "Viva la Sauna Svedese" (Hooray for the Swedish Sauna).
2012-12-22 06:11:49 AM
1 votes:

100 Watt Walrus: Full disclosure: I do know quite a few who do say "axe." (It's kinda inevitable living in Oakland.) Most of them are intelligent people, and it's just something leftover from their childhoods.


From my earlier link:

Metathesis is responsible for some common speech errors, such as children acquiring spaghetti as pasketti. The pronunciation /ˈæsk/ for ask, now considered standard, descends from a northern version of the verb that in most midland and southern texts through the 1500s was spelled with "x" or "cs", showing pronunciation as /ˈæks/. Chaucer, Caxton, and the Coverdale Bible use "ax"; Shakespeare and the King James Bible have "ask"
2012-12-22 06:06:01 AM
1 votes:

stu1-1: Lorelle: For Americans, the 10 words are:

Mischievous - Miss chee vee us
Jewelry - Jool ree
Library - lie berry
February - Feb you airy
Kindergarten - Kinder garden
Ask - Axe (seems to be a racial thing, not American)
Sherbet - Sure burt (is also considered correct)
Probably - Prob lee
Nuclear - Nuke you lur
Pronunciation - Pro noun see a shun


Cultural, not racial. Blacks in the UK don't pronounce "ask" incorrectly. Nor do most black people I know. And I'm willing to bet the vast majority of college-educated African-Americans pronounce it correctly.

Full disclosure: I do know quite a few who do say "axe." (It's kinda inevitable living in Oakland.) Most of them are intelligent people, and it's just something leftover from their childhoods.

Full disclosure, part 2: I mispronounce "orange juice" as "ornch juice." No idea why. It just happens. I don't mispronounce "orange" on its own.

/I also say "to tell you the truth" way, way, way, way too much, and use Smitty instead of Subby around here.
//The not-quite-Mrs. Walrus likes to tease me with, "Oh, please do. Please do tell me the truth."
///Smitty, I hate you for getting that song stuck in my head
////No I don't.
//Shut up, Walrus.
2012-12-22 05:40:05 AM
1 votes:

Hand Banana: I've seen quite a few people saying and writing it as prolly and it drives me crazy.


I see a distinction there....

There are people who say it that way 24/7 and don't know better, and people who say it as a casual affectation.

I say "howdy", "yall", "yonder" "prolly", almost as a joke, because language is fun to play with and it never hurts to be ridiculus on occasion. It's when people only speak that way and are incapable of sounding intelligent, that's when it's gotten ridiculous.

If you're good you can even do it in a professional environment, as a means of displaying that you're not super serial all of the time, that you're personable and get on with people.

If you have a serious problem with it, don't move to the southern US.
2012-12-22 05:24:10 AM
1 votes:

fusillade762: Phenomenon, remuneration and statistics have topped a list of the most commonly mispronounced English words.

Speakers also have a problem getting their tongue around ethnicity, hereditary and particularly

Really?  Must be a Brit thing, because I don't know anyone who has problems with those words.  Maybe "remuneration" (I switch the M and N when I say that in my head).  Though I do want to cockpunch people who say "orientate".


That's because some Britons take it to an extreme. They don't speak the language so much as chew it up and spit it out.
/Stewie
Sure, our stateside southerners and other regions do the same thing, but really, some Brits make an artform out of being unintelligible.

Remunerate.

The problem lies in that we don't have many "mun" sort of words. Money, and numbers.
Renumerate would actually make sense in place of that because it's compensation via a numerical standard, ie money.
It's an odd phenomenon, especially when you consider the similarity of characters, m , n , and u. All the verticals in sequence are harder to scan at a glance.
Similar to "rn" looking like "m", in some typesets/fonts it's virtually indistinguishable, and a very common thing for OCR to read the wrong way.

I say hell with it, and change it around to renum' officially(or both being legit). No point in taking everyone to task for it, it's become a common error because it's more fluid and memorable.
2012-12-22 04:43:13 AM
1 votes:
The worst part about THAT ONE WORD YOU SIMPLY CANNOT SPELL is that's it's this odd autistic thing right out of an Oliver Sacks book. It damn near hurts to NOT be able to spell it.
2012-12-22 04:41:23 AM
1 votes:
img11.imageshack.us
It's spelt Raymond Luxury Yach-t, but it's pronounced 'Throatwobbler Mangrove'.

/oblig.
2012-12-22 04:27:05 AM
1 votes:
The mispronunciation of "grimace" is so prevalent that most dictionaries list both the correct (long a and accent on the second syllable) and the common one (like the big purple thing in the McDonald's commercials)
2012-12-22 04:14:15 AM
1 votes:
I used to have a coworker that said "flustrated".  Very bright person, but they absolutely could not pronounce that first R.

My sister insisted the correct way to pronounce pronunciation was "pronounciation" right up until she finished college and got accepted to a prestigious law school.

My biggest pet peeve is chipotle, though.  It's the name of a major chain restaurant, for crying out loud.  The L comes AFTER the T.
2012-12-22 04:06:59 AM
1 votes:

calbert: for those who don't get it:

[images3.wikia.nocookie.net image 300x220]

Sandra Bullock

fyi, those creatures are called Snowths.

/pretty dumb headline, quite a stretch for lame pay-off.

:-/


Ohh someone has a case of smug.
2012-12-22 04:06:16 AM
1 votes:

Summercat: Marmilman: how the fark did "York" ever have three syllables? I can't imagine how it must have been pronounced.

York is the current/modern name.

The name Eboracum was turned into Eoforwic by the Anglians in the 7th century : a compound of Eofor-, from the old name, and -wic "village". This was probably by conflation of the element Ebor- with a Germanic root *eburaz (boar); by the 7th century the Old English for 'boar' had become eofor. When the Danish army conquered the city in 866, the name became rendered as Jórvík.[13]

Jórvík was gradually reduced to York in the centuries following the Norman Conquest, moving from the Middle English Yerk in the 14th century through to Yourke in the 16th century and then Yarke in the 17th century. The form York was first recorded in the 13th century.[4][14] Many present-day names of companies and places, such as Ebor taxis and the Ebor race meeting, refer to the Roman name.[15] The Archbishop of York also uses Ebor as his surname in his signature.[16]

/from the wiki


My curiosity has been satiated! Thank you so much for posting that.
2012-12-22 04:01:59 AM
1 votes:
Subby you get points for headline

/unfortunately you lose some for boring story
2012-12-22 03:48:39 AM
1 votes:
Irregardless!
2012-12-22 03:48:04 AM
1 votes:
I think lack of or improper conjugation of verbs is the bigger problem here.
2012-12-22 03:22:05 AM
1 votes:


cf.drafthouse.com

It's pronounced Fronkensteen
2012-12-22 03:12:30 AM
1 votes:
Oh, and it's La-bor-a-tory, not Lab-ra-tree
2012-12-22 03:08:42 AM
1 votes:

stu1-1: [img850.imageshack.us image 578x343]


I prefer the original.

farm9.staticflickr.com
2012-12-22 03:04:53 AM
1 votes:

Thunderboy: I run into the mispronunciation of "phenomenon" (pronounced "phenomena") a lot - most recently by a Harvard graduate.


"Phenomena" is the plural form of "phenomenon".
2012-12-22 03:01:21 AM
1 votes:
Come on, how many Americans actually use those words? You need something more than a 5th grade education to even know what half those words means. Most people k ow what potato is.

The one that bugs the shiat outta me is "rediculous". Get it right god damn it!
2012-12-22 03:01:03 AM
1 votes:
2012-12-22 03:01:00 AM
1 votes:
Fronk-n-steen
2012-12-22 02:59:58 AM
1 votes:

Lorelle: For Americans, the 10 words are:

Mischievous
Jewelry
Library
February
Kindergarten
Ask
Sherbet
Probably
Nuclear
Pronunciation


Wow, that's pacific.
2012-12-22 02:59:34 AM
1 votes:
how the fark did "York" ever have three syllables? I can't imagine how it must have been pronounced.
2012-12-22 02:51:41 AM
1 votes:
for those who don't get it:

images3.wikia.nocookie.net

Sandra Bullock

fyi, those creatures are called Snowths.

/pretty dumb headline, quite a stretch for lame pay-off.

:-/
2012-12-22 02:45:05 AM
1 votes:
Phenomenon reminds me a lot more of this (for good or for bad)

Funk Phenomenon
2012-12-22 02:43:12 AM
1 votes:
Realtor - reel a tor
Supposedly - supposably
2012-12-22 02:41:19 AM
1 votes:
"And most people talk about 'Febry' and 'Wensday'."

I'm having a hard time wrapping my mind around Febry.
 
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