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(Mirror.co.uk)   10 most commonly mispronounced words. One of them is "phenomenon." (♫ do doooooo, do do do ♫) "Phenomenon." (♫ do do do do ♫) "Phenomenon." (♫ do dooooooo, do do do, do do do, do do do, do do do, do-do do do do-do do ♫)   (mirror.co.uk) divider line 381
    More: Interesting, English Words, University of York, Boxing Day, phenomenon  
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18013 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Dec 2012 at 2:35 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-22 02:01:57 PM
"Warsh". My wife was born in Kodiak and has never been south of the Mason-Dixon line in her life. Yet she insists on pronouncing "Wash" as "Warsh".

No, I won't "Warsh" the car.
 
2012-12-22 02:04:17 PM
This thread is amazing. I can't tell who's trolling, who doesn't know what a dialect is, and who's legitimately stupid. It's the most incredible Poe's Law battle royale I've ever seen on Fark.
 
2012-12-22 02:04:32 PM

ciberido: But I'll admit I'm slightly curious why you think there's something wrong with with the common pronunciation


I'm slightly curious why you're making a big deal out of this. It's not like a go around yelling at people for mispronouncing the word. I'm just pointing out a commonly (almost universally really) mispronounced word in a thread of commonly mispronounced words.
 
2012-12-22 02:09:16 PM

lumiere: A while back I had a conference call with a team in India and one of the guys pronounced "competitors", "com pet teet er". I had to jump fast and hit the mute button so he wouldn't hear me laugh.

/why this kolaveri di?


"rhythm correct, maintain please."

I don't know how many times I've heard Kolavari Di. Thanks. Now it's in my head.
 
2012-12-22 02:16:14 PM

omeganuepsilon: Hand Banana: I've seen quite a few people saying and writing it as prolly and it drives me crazy.

I see a distinction there....

There are people who say it that way 24/7 and don't know better, and people who say it as a casual affectation.

I say "howdy", "yall", "yonder" "prolly", almost as a joke, because language is fun to play with and it never hurts to be ridiculus on occasion. It's when people only speak that way and are incapable of sounding intelligent, that's when it's gotten ridiculous.

If you're good you can even do it in a professional environment, as a means of displaying that you're not super serial all of the time, that you're personable and get on with people.

If you have a serious problem with it, don't move to the southern US.


This is my dream. I spent years in Japan working with Canadians, Brits, and Australians and developed a very neutral Mid-Atlantic accent, but I dream of someday getting good enough at something that I can let my real accent come back.

/ever seen Sergeant York?
//that's my whole family
///probably misusing slashies
 
2012-12-22 03:08:48 PM
The thing that drives me nuts is dropping the -ly from adjectives at the end of a sentence.
 
2012-12-22 03:09:48 PM

karl2025: If everyone pronounces it wrong, isn't it more true that the "correct" pronunciation is no longer correct?


Yes, unless you're a prescriptivist (a.k.a Grammar Nazi).  The irony is that Grammar Nazis are more often than not wrong about they very thing they complain so loudly of others being "wrong" about.  Split infinitives and ending sentences with prepositions are the most obvious examples.
 
2012-12-22 03:15:50 PM
What? No theater? How about one that stings my ears in America, forward?

It's FOR - WARD, not foe-werd.
 
2012-12-22 03:19:11 PM

100 Watt Walrus: Full disclosure, part 2: I mispronounce "orange juice" as "ornch juice." No idea why. It just happens. I don't mispronounce "orange" on its own.


For me, it's three words.

1. I often mispronounce "breakfast" as "brea'fast."  Unless I consciously make an effort, the "k" completely disappears.
2. Nuclear as "nuke-yoo-ler."  Again, I pronounce it correctly when I make an effort, but if I don't think about it I sound like Bush.
3. Chipotle.

In all cases I can pronounce the word correctly if I'm paying attention, but if I talk carelessly, I give the "uneducated-sounding" pronunciations.  So it's not ignorance, it's carelessness.

Also, on a somewhat related topic, having lived in countries where English wasn't the primary language, I've learned a kind of "neutral international English," which is as close to speaking without any accent as I can manage.  It has some other features, like minimal use of slang.  I've noticed that a lot of people develop some form of this "neutral English" if they live abroad long enough.  Even when speaking to another native speaker, you'll sometimes see this.  So you'll find an American talking to a Brit, for example, and the American has much less of an American accent than usual, and the Brit less of a British accent.  For the most part, it's not even a conscious thing; it just seems to happen.
 
2012-12-22 03:20:50 PM

Lorelle: For Americans, the 10 words are:

Mischievous
Jewelry
Library
February
Kindergarten
Ask
Sherbet
Probably
Nuclear
Pronunciation


Well, if you listen to some Brits they'll say it and spell it as Jewellery. fark you, it's jewelry. There's no need at all for the extra syllable.
 
2012-12-22 03:21:18 PM

Lorelle: For Americans, the 10 words are:

Mischievous
Jewelry
Library
February
Kindergarten
Ask
Sherbet
Probably
Nuclear
Pronunciation


What about Wal-Marts or Krogers?
 
2012-12-22 03:25:53 PM

deadsanta: Like how some folks pronounce "fire" as "fahr", when it should be "fi-er"


Nope. Not two syllables. One syllable.

But it's a bit like iron. Everyone says it eye-ern.
 
2012-12-22 03:26:46 PM

Z-clipped: Maybe it's because I grew up mostly in NYC, but for some reason it farking kills me when people from the west coast say "Beggle". And even though I know it's a large portion of the country that does this, I can't understand why people think that "Merry" "Marry" and "Mary" are homophones.

Medical, Matter, Mason.
Merry, marry, Mary. How hard is that?


Because they ARE homophones in the dialects many of us speak.   It's not a question of being "difficult" or of the people who speak a dialect being "ignorant."  You say you're interested in linguistics, but you're never going to even begin to understand linguistics until you let go of the conceit that the dialect of English you grew up with is the "purest" form.

It's no more rational of you to insist that people who pronounce "merry, marry, and Mary" the same way are wrong, ignorant, or lazy than it would be for me to lambaste you for mispronouncing the word "wound" (as in Injury) --- in Shakespeare's time it rhymed with "round," just like the past tense of "wind," and it's equally "wrong" of you to "mispronounce" it as "woond."
 
2012-12-22 03:28:49 PM
exetera.
 
2012-12-22 03:32:01 PM

tirob: Doesn't bother me. A lot of people in the US (including me) pronounce "winter" as "winner," "counter" as "counner," etc.


And batter rhymes with sadder, butter rhymes with rudder. It's a consonant shift and if spelling weren't standardized we'd spell them the way they're pronounced.

shiat, English still spells things the same as they were before the Vowel Shift so we say n-ai-f for knife (k-n-ee-f-eh) and n-ai-t for knight (k-n-ee-gh-t) where the gh is a sound like hocking a loogie.
 
2012-12-22 03:33:43 PM

ChildOfBhaal: omeganuepsilon: Hand Banana: I've seen quite a few people saying and writing it as prolly and it drives me crazy.

I say "howdy", "yall", "yonder" "prolly", almost as a joke, because language is fun to play with and it never hurts to be ridiculus on occasion. It's when people only speak that way and are incapable of sounding intelligent, that's when it's gotten ridiculous.

What's wrong with yonder? Perfectly good, correctly pronounced word.


"Y'all" is second-person plural in American English .  I eschew it when dealing with non-Americans in the same way an Australian might avoid the word "ute" in an international setting.  If American English is your first language, then there is no excuse for you complaining about "y'all."  It's part of the language.  Deal with it.
 
2012-12-22 03:37:58 PM
Y'all is a contraction and I think it's perfectly acceptable. I prefer it immensely to "you guys" or "yous" or "y'uns". These are all horrible.
 
2012-12-22 03:40:51 PM

GungFu: Stoopid peeple:

click
aluminum
congradulations


Normal people:

clique
aluminium
congratulations


Considering that the man who came up with the name "aluminum" spelled it originally with only the single "I", I don't think it's the people who spell it "aluminum" who are stupid.

I will say again I find it amusing how often Grammar Nazis are wrong about the very things they insist are "stupid" or "ignorant."  It really is such a perfect combination of hypocrisy, ignorance, and smugness.
 
2012-12-22 03:43:44 PM

Rose McGowan Loveslave: "Its levi-O-sa not levi-o-SA!"
H. Granger

also the word for my parents and I is "breffes"t for breakfast.


Ah, so I'm not the only one who drops the "k" from "breakfast."  I was rather wondering where I had picked up that bad habit.
 
2012-12-22 03:50:46 PM

Anderson's Pooper: Temperature - pronounced temp-a-cher.

Even the weather guys on the news screw this one up.


Blame the  laundry detergent commercial for the 1980s.
 
2012-12-22 03:51:03 PM

Benjimin_Dover:
They used the wrong word not mispronounced the right word.

It's like saying somebody mispronounced the word "car" by saying "truck."


StashMonster:

eh? Phenomena is the plural, phenomenon the singular. I don't understand what you are saying ... that he misuses the plural?


Clearly I need to provide more context!

I currently edit audio books for a living. The individual in question was narrating a book they wrote. Upon encountering the word "phenomenon", this individual pronounced it "phenomena". This isn't about using the wrong word or form of a word, it is about reading a word and not pronouncing it correctly. The word "phenomena" also appeared many times in the book, and was pronounced correctly.

This is a common issue with books read by the author. I don't recall ever running into this issue with books read by professional voice actors.
 
2012-12-22 03:53:28 PM

Mr_Ectomy: Hey! Americans!

It's "soar-ee" not "sari"

Sari is an Indian garment.

/sorry


Hey, non-Americans!

We don't care how you think "sorry" should be pronounced.

/Not sorry.
 
2012-12-22 04:06:48 PM

Thunderboy: Benjimin_Dover:
They used the wrong word not mispronounced the right word.

It's like saying somebody mispronounced the word "car" by saying "truck."

StashMonster:

eh? Phenomena is the plural, phenomenon the singular. I don't understand what you are saying ... that he misuses the plural?

Clearly I need to provide more context!

I currently edit audio books for a living. The individual in question was narrating a book they wrote. Upon encountering the word "phenomenon", this individual pronounced it "phenomena". This isn't about using the wrong word or form of a word, it is about reading a word and not pronouncing it correctly. The word "phenomena" also appeared many times in the book, and was pronounced correctly.

This is a common issue with books read by the author. I don't recall ever running into this issue with books read by professional voice actors.


It bugged me when I listened to the Dresden Files series read by James Marsters and he pronounced "chitinous" with a ch as in "cheese" rather than a ch as in "christ." I think the word appears twice in the whole series, which might be the only time I've ever seen it in fiction.
 
2012-12-22 04:13:06 PM
Me: "Do you have a pen?"
Boston friend: "There's one in the drah."
"Where?"
"The drah."
"The what?"
"The drah. Right there. The drah"
*pointing "The drawer?"
"Yeah, the drah."
 
2012-12-22 04:26:37 PM
Posting my Weeners ever, to say that this is the best headline ever.
 
2012-12-22 04:30:07 PM
ciberido:
"I will say again I find it amusing how often Grammar Nazis are wrong about the very things they insist are "stupid" or "ignorant."  It really is such a perfect combination of hypocrisy, ignorance, and smugness."

Is someone a grammar nazi because you define them as such? Because some might define you as one... Which would make the hypocrisy accusation particularly accurate...
 
2012-12-22 04:41:45 PM
Warsh. It's probably already been mentioned, but my old man is from IL and he pronounces wash as "warsh" among a few other words really strangely like cul-de-sac and some others I'm forgetting right now. I tried to explain that there is no r in the word wash, but he's 42, too old to change him now-but I inwardly giggle every week on laundry day and he knows it. And I guess it's more of a mid-western dialect thing as he's from a really small town. His son, however, can still be saved, and I try to correct his pronunciation a little bit here and there. Want the kid to get into college and sound reasonably intelligent when he starts dating. We'll be warshing all of our clothes tomorrow, I s'pose.
 
2012-12-22 04:50:34 PM
specialkae:

Warsh. It's probably already been mentioned, but my old man is from IL and he pronounces wash as "warsh" among a few other words really strangely like cul-de-sac and some others I'm forgetting right now. I tried to explain that there is no r in the word wash, but he's 42, too old to change him now-but I inwardly giggle every week on laundry day and he knows it. And I guess it's more of a mid-western dialect thing as he's from a really small town. His son, however, can still be saved, and I try to correct his pronunciation a little bit here and there. Want the kid to get into college and sound reasonably intelligent when he starts dating. We'll be warshing all of our clothes tomorrow, I s'pose.

Yeah, I used to catch hell for that from my ex... "WHERE DID THE R COME FROM?!?!?"

Bawlmore / Warshington, I guess.
 
2012-12-22 05:12:03 PM
I know a carpenter who thinks that the proper terms for measuring a box or cabinet is length, width and heighth. Aacck!!  It's just plain height.
 
2012-12-22 05:31:12 PM
Peripherally -- per-if-ee-al-lee
Simultaneously -- sime-yoo-tain-eeus
 
2012-12-22 05:37:06 PM
Is "amidst" a proper word, or just a poetic ornamentation of "amid"

/too lazy to google.
 
2012-12-22 05:39:20 PM

FizixJunkee: Yeah, I've heard this, too. I don't know how or why anyone would say "disorientated."


Maybe because they're disorientated?
 
2012-12-22 06:24:47 PM

basilbrush: Everyone besides me pronounces "sour" wrong, unless it does in fact have a "w" in it.


the hell?

What are you talking about? "our" forces your lips into "w" shape. Its supposed to sound like that.
 
2012-12-22 06:26:37 PM

Wenchmaster:
Slightly related note: I once got in an argument with a Navy Commander about the proper use of the apostrophe in "its". He insisted on applying the apostrophe to the possessive, and I told him he was wrong (my tendency to tell people of higher rank they were wrong probably contributed to my lack of promotion in the service, btw). It mattered, because I was in charge of the work center with the engraving machine for that particular ship, and my guys had delivered a commemorative brass placard to the Commander for some function or another. Commander Spellsbadly insisted we re-do the work because of the apostrophe, and I told him no.
(/csb)


That was a cool story. You being respectful despite his dumbassness probably made him even madder. Kudos. Where is the gottamnded humility anymore?
/btw, what is the farking headline song s'posed to be?
 
2012-12-22 06:35:00 PM

Stinkyy: /btw, what is the farking headline song s'posed to be?


I think it's this.
 
2012-12-22 06:41:31 PM

JonnyBGoode: Wistersistersistershire sauce.

Bascetti? (Spaghetti, usually a kids; thing)

My ex used to pronounce syrup "surp." Drove me crazy.

Also, sWords.



Hey Brian, would you like some Cool Hwip? How about some Hweat Thins?"


I call it wherestheshiatter sauce.
 
2012-12-22 06:47:09 PM

Dayglo Brown: Warsh.


My mom says it that way. Drives me bonkers.
 
2012-12-22 06:51:08 PM

Stinkyy: That was a cool story. You being respectful despite his dumbassness probably made him even madder. Kudos. Where is the gottamnded humility anymore?
/btw, what is the farking headline song s'posed to be?


Should have asked for written orders. THAT would be funny if one of his superiors pointed it out to him after and he tried to chew you out for it after.

And the song is from a bit by the muppets. Banamanam.
 
2012-12-22 06:57:56 PM

HotWingAgenda: I used to have a coworker that said "flustrated".  Very bright person, but they absolutely could not pronounce that first R.

My sister insisted the correct way to pronounce pronunciation was "pronounciation" right up until she finished college and got accepted to a prestigious law school.

My biggest pet peeve is chipotle, though.  It's the name of a major chain restaurant, for crying out loud.  The L comes AFTER the T.


Flustrated is a perfectly cromulent word. It's a compound word created from flustered and frustrated.
 
2012-12-22 07:13:03 PM
I am 40 years old and I have never once spelled the word seperate separate correctly on the first attempt.
 
2012-12-22 07:37:50 PM
I narrated a training course and they asked me to retake every incident of the word "resources." I naturally pronounce it as "reZourses" and they wanted "reSources." Now it trips me up every freakin time I have to say it.
 
2012-12-22 07:38:37 PM
Damn it Subby, thats gonna stick with me.  And also, Muppets.
 
2012-12-22 07:48:46 PM
Thanks for the song. 23M views and I'd never heard it, at least lately. *I* must be obscure.
 
2012-12-22 07:50:10 PM

Z-clipped: buckler: I had a kid whose speech was all kind of farked up at six, because his mom thought his mispronunciations were 'cute'. He made some really bizarre sound substitutions. When he asked for a drink, he'd say "I bant a sink of bawter." It took him years to overcome it.

[readsq.com image 356x439]

"May I mambo dogface to the banana patch?"

/get that kid a "special" test

Mad_Radhu: One really common mispronounced word is forte, which is really pronounced like "fort". Of course, if you do pronounce it correctly, people will think you are an idiot.

Linguistics is one of my personal louds.

omeganuepsilon: If you have a serious problem with it, don't move to the southern US.

Imma gonna 'gree with y'all on that point.

kellythecat: what about bagel?

Maybe it's because I grew up mostly in NYC, but for some reason it farking kills me when people from the west coast say "Beggle". And even though I know it's a large portion of the country that does this, I can't understand why people think that "Merry" "Marry" and "Mary" are homophones.

Medical, Matter, Mason.
Merry, marry, Mary. How hard is that?


I was audio engineering for a friend narrating Sci-Fi/Fantasy novels. He's from Kalamazoo, Michigan and his "a's" are all flat. I wanted to kill the author every time we encountered a Centaur or Minotaur because they came out as CenTAR and MinoTAR and as a New Yorker I couldn't let that shiat stand.
 
2012-12-22 08:57:18 PM

Molokai: Posting my Weeners ever, to say that this is the best headline ever.


LOL! Filter-Pwned on his Boobies.
 
2012-12-22 09:32:58 PM

Koodz: omeganuepsilon: Hand Banana: I've seen quite a few people saying and writing it as prolly and it drives me crazy.

I see a distinction there....

There are people who say it that way 24/7 and don't know better, and people who say it as a casual affectation.

I say "howdy", "yall", "yonder" "prolly", almost as a joke, because language is fun to play with and it never hurts to be ridiculus on occasion. It's when people only speak that way and are incapable of sounding intelligent, that's when it's gotten ridiculous.

If you're good you can even do it in a professional environment, as a means of displaying that you're not super serial all of the time, that you're personable and get on with people.

If you have a serious problem with it, don't move to the southern US.

This is my dream. I spent years in Japan working with Canadians, Brits, and Australians and developed a very neutral Mid-Atlantic accent, but I dream of someday getting good enough at something that I can let my real accent come back.

/ever seen Sergeant York?
//that's my whole family
///probably misusing slashies


It's more of a per-individual basis in my experience. Some people would just rather deal with a "good ol' boy" than someone who's officious sounding. YMMV of course.

Maybe that real turn of the era high-class/distinguished southern accent could be universally acceptable, same way some of the more affluent Britons have a bit more simply granted respect.

I am the polar opposite. I've got that generic mid west accent. No southern, no Fargo/nordic/amish, no NY or Boston. No accent by default, but I do find I tend to mimic who I'm with. Going to England was a blast. Took a while to get it down, but worth it.... if you have that generic accent in a loud club and you order a drink without an accent they won't know WTF you're talking about. You really wouldn't think the accent for "Rum -n- Coke" or "vodak redbull" would make a difference, but it can.

/can't think of the right descriptor for that high falutin' style of accent
//slashies are very difficult to misuse
///only way I can think of is using them as a signature or trademark
////ie irrelevant to the post(and exactly the same in all threads) and more about advertising how cool/hip/unique/clever you are
///like people that randomly add "esquire" to their name to sound/look impressive
//just think back to English class and how to write letters
/simple post script or afterthought..or disclaimers
 
2012-12-22 09:35:12 PM

Snapper Carr: ciberido: But I'll admit I'm slightly curious why you think there's something wrong with with the common pronunciation

I'm slightly curious why you're making a big deal out of this. It's not like a go around yelling at people for mispronouncing the word. I'm just pointing out a commonly (almost universally really) mispronounced word in a thread of commonly mispronounced words.


You brought it up but I'm the one " making a big deal out of this "?  Whatever you say, chief.
 
2012-12-22 09:43:46 PM
 ciberido"I will say again I find it amusing how often Grammar Nazis are wrong about the very things they insist are "stupid" or "ignorant."  It really is such a perfect combination of hypocrisy, ignorance, and smugness."

o'really:Is someone a grammar nazi because you define them as such? Because some might define you as one... Which would make the hypocrisy accusation particularly accurate...

Grammar Nazis are prescriptivist.  I am not prescriptivist.  Therefore, while I may have many faults (including hypocrisy  perhaps), being a Grammaz Nazi is not one of them.

Feel free to call me a Grammar Nazi, however, if it helps you to feel a little bit better about yourself.
 
2012-12-22 09:57:47 PM
"People always find a way of simplifying words that they find difficult to get their tongues round, so that an everyday word like 'handbag' sounds like 'hambag'.

Now I remember first hearing it as "hambag" when I was a little kid. It became obvious to me later that people were just pronouncing the word too quickly for me to have heard the right sounds, but at the time it confused me because those things had nothing to do with ham or any other sort of meat.
 
2012-12-22 10:03:13 PM

Thunderboy: Benjimin_Dover:
They used the wrong word not mispronounced the right word.

It's like saying somebody mispronounced the word "car" by saying "truck."

StashMonster:

eh? Phenomena is the plural, phenomenon the singular. I don't understand what you are saying ... that he misuses the plural?

Clearly I need to provide more context!

I currently edit audio books for a living. The individual in question was narrating a book they wrote. Upon encountering the word "phenomenon", this individual pronounced it "phenomena". This isn't about using the wrong word or form of a word, it is about reading a word and not pronouncing it correctly. The word "phenomena" also appeared many times in the book, and was pronounced correctly.

This is a common issue with books read by the author. I don't recall ever running into this issue with books read by professional voice actors.


That clears it up as I would have suggested having the person read the word in a sentence and see how he pronounced it.
 
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