If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Mirror.co.uk)   10 most commonly mispronounced words. One of them is "phenomenon." (♫ do doooooo, do do do ♫) "Phenomenon." (♫ do do do do ♫) "Phenomenon." (♫ do dooooooo, do do do, do do do, do do do, do do do, do-do do do do-do do ♫)   (mirror.co.uk) divider line 381
    More: Interesting, English Words, University of York, Boxing Day, phenomenon  
•       •       •

18013 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Dec 2012 at 2:35 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



381 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-12-22 08:41:57 AM
Woshster -- Washserter -- Worseter -- Woostursher -- Steak sauce.
 
2012-12-22 08:42:39 AM

omeganuepsilon: kellythecat: What light through yonder window breaks?

/missed the hillbilly memo

Missed it by a long time. You do know you're trying to give old english some relevancy post year 2000 right?

As a modern used common usage, it's ALL hillbilly.


You do know that Old English lasted only until roughly the 13th Century, right? Shakespeare was Early Modern English.

Also, Merry Christmas:
"Hither, page, and stand by me
If thou know'st it, telling
Yonder peasant, who is he?
Where and what his dwelling?"
 
2012-12-22 08:46:49 AM
Try getting a japanese person to pronounce "auxiliary". My japanese teacher once made fun of a classmate of mine, because of his pronunciation of an "ahzirialy" verb. We made him repeat it three times before he gave up and said "No japanese person can pronounce that word."
 
2012-12-22 08:47:07 AM
I can never pronounce "ask" it always comes out "axed".
 
2012-12-22 08:48:12 AM
Gloucester
Worcestershire
 
2012-12-22 08:55:02 AM
When listening to football commentators:

He is super AKKURUHTT

I also heard a DOCTOR on the radio the other day say "Irregardless"

/Ack-yur-uht
 
2012-12-22 08:56:40 AM
Is it pronounced supposably or supposively?
 
2012-12-22 09:02:43 AM
Orient and orientate have different meanings. Disoriented would surely mean to be removed from the Orient. Disorientated is to have lost ones bearings
 
2012-12-22 09:07:18 AM

Ringshadow: I'm in nuclear power and I say nukeyoular. It seems regional honestly. Accents and whatnot.
Of course sometimes I accidently say "Missourruh" to the endless amusement of coworkers..


Are you the janitor?

I don't want you operating the rods if you say Nookuler!
 
2012-12-22 09:08:54 AM
Came here to say "peculiarly," and failed miserably :(
 
2012-12-22 09:15:10 AM

stu1-1: Lorelle: For Americans, the 10 words are:

Mischievous - Miss chee vee us
Jewelry - Jool ree
Library - lie berry
February - Feb you airy
Kindergarten - Kinder garden
Ask - Axe (seems to be a racial thing, not American)
Sherbet - Sure burt (is also considered correct)
Probably - Prob lee
Nuclear - Nuke you lur
Pronunciation - Pro noun see a shun


Have also heard "Jew-la-ree"
 
2012-12-22 09:18:29 AM
Temperature - pronounced temp-a-cher.

Even the weather guys on the news screw this one up.
 
2012-12-22 09:19:20 AM
What gets me all stabby is people who insist on using 'I' when they should use 'me'.
 
2012-12-22 09:25:44 AM
Michigan accents kill me.   "Let's stahp by SevenuhLeven and gedduh pahp."
 
2012-12-22 09:31:43 AM

Alassra: Western Pennsylvania home of :

Wash = Warsh
Dahn Tahn = Downtown
Gint = Giant

Pittsburghese is a plague on the English language.


What do you expect from people who can't even pronounce the name of their city correctly? Pittsburgh has 3 other pronunciations that I hear. Picks-burgh, Picks-bird, and Piss-burgh.
 
2012-12-22 09:36:55 AM
Even living in Texas, I largely lack the accent according to friends and family. About all I say that could count is "y'all"
 
2012-12-22 09:42:56 AM

Lee Jackson Beauregard: thisispete: Oh, and it's La-bor-a-tory, not Lab-ra-tree

It's a LABORatory, not a labORATORY.


Only if you're Boris Karloff.
 
2012-12-22 09:43:11 AM
"thesaurus" pronounced "fee-a-saurus". Makes it sound like a dinosaur.

/ I don't say the leading h in herb, but only because I don't say the leading h in any word
// Or a trailing g.
/// I may not be elpin
 
2012-12-22 09:45:26 AM

Marmilman: pedobearapproved: Marmilman: how the fark did "York" ever have three syllables? I can't imagine how it must have been pronounced.

"I-am-Sofa-King Wee-Todd-Did"

I don't get it. That sounds like "I am so farking retarded." I'm looking for the three syllable version of "York."


I bet it might have something to do with the original Latin name for the city "Eboracum". Maybe they originally were calling it E-yor-ik? (said quickly)

/I have no idea, just a guess.
 
2012-12-22 09:46:26 AM
Hey! Americans!

It's "soar-ee" not "sari"

Sari is an Indian garment.

/sorry
 
2012-12-22 09:49:06 AM

Stavr0: Woshster -- Washserter -- Worseter -- Woostursher -- Steak sauce.


this.jpg

Worchesshirshirshir...something...
 
2012-12-22 09:49:24 AM

LDM90: Stop saying "an historical". I'm sure you think you sound more intelligent, but you sound like you don't know h isn't a vowel.


Economist style guide
 
2012-12-22 09:51:21 AM
For some reason both my step-father and father in law pronounce batteries as bat-trees. Drives me nuts!
 
2012-12-22 09:53:02 AM

Swiss Colony: Orient and orientate have different meanings. Disoriented would surely mean to be removed from the Orient. Disorientated is to have lost ones bearings


"Orientate" is an improper word formation, and its use should be discouraged.

The problem stems from the ability in English to convert verbs into nouns and vice-versa. The proper verb-form is "orient", and its corresponding noun-form is "orientation". People sometimes take "orientation" and mistakenly assume that its verb-form is "orientate".
 
2012-12-22 09:54:17 AM

A challenger appears: Marmilman: pedobearapproved: Marmilman: how the fark did "York" ever have three syllables? I can't imagine how it must have been pronounced.

"I-am-Sofa-King Wee-Todd-Did"

I don't get it. That sounds like "I am so farking retarded." I'm looking for the three syllable version of "York."

I bet it might have something to do with the original Latin name for the city "Eboracum". Maybe they originally were calling it E-yor-ik? (said quickly)

/I have no idea, just a guess.


Ah, I should have kept reading the comments, someone found it out. Interesting stuff.
 
2012-12-22 09:54:36 AM

katerbug72: For some reason both my step-father and father in law pronounce batteries as bat-trees. Drives me nuts!


My dad does that as well, but he also says dressing gown (robe) and Chesterfield (couch).
 
2012-12-22 09:59:42 AM

Mr_Ectomy: Hey! Americans!

It's "soar-ee" not "sari"

Sari is an Indian garment.

/sorry


Sore-y? Like Michael J. Fox? That drives me nuts.
 
2012-12-22 10:00:28 AM
Athalete.
 
2012-12-22 10:01:24 AM

LDM90: Mr_Ectomy: Hey! Americans!

It's "soar-ee" not "sari"

Sari is an Indian garment.

/sorry

Sore-y? Like Michael J. Fox? That drives me nuts.


Hey! It's our word!

/Canadian
 
2012-12-22 10:02:10 AM

fusillade762: Phenomenon, remuneration and statistics have topped a list of the most commonly mispronounced English words.

Speakers also have a problem getting their tongue around ethnicity, hereditary and particularly

Really?  Must be a Brit thing, because I don't know anyone who has problems with those words.  Maybe "remuneration" (I switch the M and N when I say that in my head).  Though I do want to cockpunch people who say "orientate".


I do the same, simply because it makes sense from a root word standpoint.
 
2012-12-22 10:03:43 AM

katerbug72: For some reason both my step-father and father in law pronounce batteries as bat-trees. Drives me nuts!


my grandpa says "tunda and light-nin" and "A-rab" :)

/french canadian
 
2012-12-22 10:05:28 AM

omeganuepsilon: Aluminum Falcon: My ex-supervisor at work would be talking about budgetary concerns and would say something about needing to be careful with what we spend since the end of the "physical" year was June 30. Lolsigh.

Wouldn't that be "sense"? (if not "because"....these are terms dealing with logic, "since" is a term of passing time)

lolsigh indeed.


Dictionary, motherfarker. Get one.
 
2012-12-22 10:06:53 AM
i45.tinypic.com

One of the best RiffTrax shorts.

/game, set, Blandford.
 
2012-12-22 10:07:03 AM

tonguedepressor: I can never pronounce "ask" it always comes out "axed".


That paints a picture to be sure.
 
2012-12-22 10:09:43 AM
I called Dun & Bradstreet to order an investigation on a company in Georgia that was not listed. They used (at that time) an offshore call center to handle the requests. The gentleman I spoke with repeatedly pronounced the state as if it were a derivative of "geography," and not of "George."
 
2012-12-22 10:11:44 AM

omeganuepsilon: Yes, it's a valid word, as many are, that people still would rather not use or have said to them. It's got that redneck hillbilly stigma. It's not just the accent, it's the sound of the word. A vast amount of people that say it sound like they don't like to read berks, not even gersberms


I reckon they need to get over it.
 
2012-12-22 10:12:44 AM
Link
Good stuff... Love the Muppets!
 
2012-12-22 10:13:41 AM
Ah came here to git sumpin but now I caint member what.

nebbermind
 
2012-12-22 10:20:21 AM

Swiss Colony: Orient and orientate have different meanings. Disoriented would surely mean to be removed from the Orient. Disorientated is to have lost ones bearings


They both mean the same thing. "Orient" is American and "orientate" is British and sounds stupid (and I say this as a colonist of British descent). I'm not "orientateering" when I'm using a compass to navigate. "Orient" as in "to find your bearings" comes from the the Middle Ages, when maps were oriented with east at the top. Churches were also oriented with the altar to the east/rising sun. To say something is "easted" when pointed to the east makes more sense to me than "eastatated", which sounds like a verbal avalanche of derp.

Or imagine "occident" (west) as a verb. "Occidentated". Gah!
 
2012-12-22 10:25:15 AM
Obama?
 
2012-12-22 10:27:04 AM

traylor: Obama?


Barerack Obammar? (British)
 
2012-12-22 10:27:11 AM

Mock26: Let us not judge those who cannot pronounce words. Let us instead pass judgement on those who cannot spell!

:-D


I'm not sure 1) what you're saying here, and 2) if you're serious. "Phenomenon" is pronounced with the terminal "n" voiced. It sounds like it is spelled. "Phenomena" is the plural of the word "phenomenon," and also sounds like it is spelled, assuming you dig the whole "ph" = "f" thing.
 
2012-12-22 10:28:31 AM

Gleeman: Stavr0: Woshster -- Washserter -- Worseter -- Woostursher -- Steak sauce.

this.jpg

Worchesshirshirshir...something...


A1?
 
2012-12-22 10:29:32 AM

bborchar: Try getting a japanese person to pronounce "auxiliary". My japanese teacher once made fun of a classmate of mine, because of his pronunciation of an "ahzirialy" verb. We made him repeat it three times before he gave up and said "No japanese person can pronounce that word."


One of the advantages of working for a Japanese owned company is that my mis-pronunciations of words go completely unnoticed.

/and most japanese wouldn't have a problem pronouncing 'auxiliary'.
 
2012-12-22 10:35:57 AM
i have a very intelligent, well educated friend who has trouble with two words:

wolf = woof
philadelphia = philadelthia

/he does not hear it
//???
 
2012-12-22 10:42:18 AM

Marmilman: how the fark did "York" ever have three syllables? I can't imagine how it must have been pronounced.


The funny thing is that it was originally FOUR syllables.
 
2012-12-22 10:44:35 AM
Everyone besides me pronounces "sour" wrong, unless it does in fact have a "w" in it.
 
2012-12-22 10:46:55 AM

Swiss Colony: What gets me all stabby is people who insist on using 'I' when they should use 'me'.


Over-correction. Parents and teachers chide children who misuse "me" so much that people grow up afraid to use it, even in cases where it would be correct.

I can't even think of the last time I heard "myself" used correctly.

Correct: I pleasured myself this morning.

Incorrect: Your mom blew the pool boy and myself this morning.
 
2012-12-22 10:49:27 AM

strapp3r: i have a very intelligent, well educated friend who has trouble with two words:

wolf = woof
philadelphia = philadelthia

/he does not hear it
//???


As for wolf, some people just seem to have trouble with those Ls. Take the word public, for example. Ira Glass says "pubbic" and Tom Brokaw would say something like "pubuic".

I happen to think people who have speech impediments should probably not be in broadcasting, but that's another matter.
 
2012-12-22 10:51:02 AM

thisispete: 20/20: Personal pet peeve this time of year; singers who say "Sanna" for Santa Claus.
Just curious; how many people say the "h" in herb?

In New Zealand we pronounce the "h". They might drop it in some British accents - for a relatively small area they have a lot of different accents, but I can't recall hearing any English or Scottish accent where it's dropped.

It's kind of viewed as an American shibboleth. If I hear someone say 'erbs, I know they're from the US.


My family is from Newfoundland - among all the other words we say funny, the 'h' always gets dropped off the beginning of words - "I'm goin' 'ome to me 'ouse for the 'erbs". My grandfather had a really heavy accent, and used to drive me bonkers by changing my name from 'Diana' to 'Doy-anner'.
Lard Jeezus.
 
Displayed 50 of 381 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report