If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Mirror.co.uk)   10 most commonly mispronounced words. One of them is "phenomenon." (♫ do doooooo, do do do ♫) "Phenomenon." (♫ do do do do ♫) "Phenomenon." (♫ do dooooooo, do do do, do do do, do do do, do do do, do-do do do do-do do ♫)   (mirror.co.uk) divider line 381
    More: Interesting, English Words, University of York, Boxing Day, phenomenon  
•       •       •

18011 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Dec 2012 at 2:35 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



381 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-12-22 05:09:02 AM

Omahawg: de doo doo doo de da da da

that's all I want to say to you


I'm Blue da ba dee da ba die da ba dee da ba die da ba dee da ba die da ba dee da ba die da ba dee da ba die da ba dee da ba die da ba dee da ba die...
 
2012-12-22 05:09:15 AM

Summercat: Marmilman:

My curiosity has been satiated! Thank you so much for posting that.

I'm used to satiating all sorts of appetities, hon ;3


Challenge Accepted :)
 
2012-12-22 05:18:35 AM
I'm drunk a lot so lots of words are hard for me. Statistics is one I fark up all the time along with specific and inexplicable. It's totally not embarrassing at all though.
 
2012-12-22 05:21:30 AM

Marmilman: Summercat: Marmilman:

My curiosity has been satiated! Thank you so much for posting that.

I'm used to satiating all sorts of appetities, hon ;3

Challenge Accepted :)


Im a furry and former otaku. have seen everything both fandoms have had to offer.

Hit me.
 
2012-12-22 05:24:10 AM

fusillade762: Phenomenon, remuneration and statistics have topped a list of the most commonly mispronounced English words.

Speakers also have a problem getting their tongue around ethnicity, hereditary and particularly

Really?  Must be a Brit thing, because I don't know anyone who has problems with those words.  Maybe "remuneration" (I switch the M and N when I say that in my head).  Though I do want to cockpunch people who say "orientate".


That's because some Britons take it to an extreme. They don't speak the language so much as chew it up and spit it out.
/Stewie
Sure, our stateside southerners and other regions do the same thing, but really, some Brits make an artform out of being unintelligible.

Remunerate.

The problem lies in that we don't have many "mun" sort of words. Money, and numbers.
Renumerate would actually make sense in place of that because it's compensation via a numerical standard, ie money.
It's an odd phenomenon, especially when you consider the similarity of characters, m , n , and u. All the verticals in sequence are harder to scan at a glance.
Similar to "rn" looking like "m", in some typesets/fonts it's virtually indistinguishable, and a very common thing for OCR to read the wrong way.

I say hell with it, and change it around to renum' officially(or both being legit). No point in taking everyone to task for it, it's become a common error because it's more fluid and memorable.
 
2012-12-22 05:26:00 AM

milkyshirt: How about "dudn't" instead of "doesn't"? My mom says it like that constantly and it is ridiculously grating to my ears.

I also had a strong urge to slap a friend when I discovered that, not only did she say "probly" rather than "probably", she thought it was spelled that way too.


I've seen quite a few people saying and writing it as prolly and it drives me crazy.
 
2012-12-22 05:27:49 AM

Mad_Radhu: One really common mispronounced word is forte, which is really pronounced like "fort". Of course, if you do pronounce it correctly, people will think you are an idiot.


That's probably due to the musical term, for which the correct pronunciation is the two-syllable one, I figure.
 
2012-12-22 05:30:18 AM
I hear British people pronouncing words on the wrong syllable a lot. What's that about?
 
2012-12-22 05:30:24 AM
Banana gun do do do do do
i108.photobucket.com
 
2012-12-22 05:31:51 AM

stu1-1: Nuclear - Nuke you lur


Where precisely does the middle "you" come from in the spelling?

It should be "New-clear"
 
2012-12-22 05:33:07 AM
Link

smartphone absent, it always make me want to spell idiotphone.
 
2012-12-22 05:39:39 AM

Lee Jackson Beauregard: thisispete: Oh, and it's La-bor-a-tory, not Lab-ra-tree

It's a LABORatory, not a labORATORY.


A lay-ber-a-tory?
 
2012-12-22 05:40:05 AM

Hand Banana: I've seen quite a few people saying and writing it as prolly and it drives me crazy.


I see a distinction there....

There are people who say it that way 24/7 and don't know better, and people who say it as a casual affectation.

I say "howdy", "yall", "yonder" "prolly", almost as a joke, because language is fun to play with and it never hurts to be ridiculus on occasion. It's when people only speak that way and are incapable of sounding intelligent, that's when it's gotten ridiculous.

If you're good you can even do it in a professional environment, as a means of displaying that you're not super serial all of the time, that you're personable and get on with people.

If you have a serious problem with it, don't move to the southern US.
 
2012-12-22 05:50:59 AM
I only recently learned "segue" (comes up as not a word in spellcheck here...) Was pronounced "segway", and not "see-g". I'd only seen it written and figgerd it was just a word no one said out loud.

I cannot for the life of me say "arnold palmer". I sound like the governator when I attempt it.

My southern (california) fam sez "vy-een-a" sausages for vienna sausages, those little things that come in a can. And "pee-can" for pecan. Those pronunciations makes me happy.
 
2012-12-22 05:53:20 AM

zzrhardy: stu1-1: Nuclear - Nuke you lur

Where precisely does the middle "you" come from in the spelling?

It should be "New-clear"


No.

New klee ar

from

new klee us

As for the new cue lar,
Link
 
2012-12-22 06:02:18 AM
I agree with funny headline, but someone disapproves...

www.bubblews.com
 
2012-12-22 06:05:27 AM

kellythecat: what about bagel?


images.hitfix.com
/baggle
 
2012-12-22 06:06:01 AM

stu1-1: Lorelle: For Americans, the 10 words are:

Mischievous - Miss chee vee us
Jewelry - Jool ree
Library - lie berry
February - Feb you airy
Kindergarten - Kinder garden
Ask - Axe (seems to be a racial thing, not American)
Sherbet - Sure burt (is also considered correct)
Probably - Prob lee
Nuclear - Nuke you lur
Pronunciation - Pro noun see a shun


Cultural, not racial. Blacks in the UK don't pronounce "ask" incorrectly. Nor do most black people I know. And I'm willing to bet the vast majority of college-educated African-Americans pronounce it correctly.

Full disclosure: I do know quite a few who do say "axe." (It's kinda inevitable living in Oakland.) Most of them are intelligent people, and it's just something leftover from their childhoods.

Full disclosure, part 2: I mispronounce "orange juice" as "ornch juice." No idea why. It just happens. I don't mispronounce "orange" on its own.

/I also say "to tell you the truth" way, way, way, way too much, and use Smitty instead of Subby around here.
//The not-quite-Mrs. Walrus likes to tease me with, "Oh, please do. Please do tell me the truth."
///Smitty, I hate you for getting that song stuck in my head
////No I don't.
//Shut up, Walrus.
 
2012-12-22 06:08:25 AM

o'really: I cannot for the life of me say "arnold palmer". I sound like the governator when I attempt it.


I can say arnold. Palmer has a trick, you start the "L" sound and give up half way through. You do it slow it sounds like W, but when you let it roll out it sounds right.

It like dropping a T partially off of a word. Damni(t). It's not quite a silent T, it's a half T. Not quite enunciated T like titty.
Comes from how we normalize a vowel sound after T. People who take speech class to do it "correctly" seemingly always end up enunciating a "whole" T, to include a "tuh" or "tah" sound at the end that makes them sound ridiculous.
 
2012-12-22 06:11:49 AM

100 Watt Walrus: Full disclosure: I do know quite a few who do say "axe." (It's kinda inevitable living in Oakland.) Most of them are intelligent people, and it's just something leftover from their childhoods.


From my earlier link:

Metathesis is responsible for some common speech errors, such as children acquiring spaghetti as pasketti. The pronunciation /ˈæsk/ for ask, now considered standard, descends from a northern version of the verb that in most midland and southern texts through the 1500s was spelled with "x" or "cs", showing pronunciation as /ˈæks/. Chaucer, Caxton, and the Coverdale Bible use "ax"; Shakespeare and the King James Bible have "ask"
 
2012-12-22 06:14:49 AM
Rotisserary
Expresso
 
2012-12-22 06:16:01 AM

jtown: stu1-1: [img850.imageshack.us image 578x343]

I prefer the original.

[farm9.staticflickr.com image 458x360]


Because no one ever has any clue when I mention the exact same thing:

"Mah Nà Mah Nà" debuted as part of Umiliani's soundtrack for the Italian mondo film Svezia, inferno e paradiso (Sweden: Heaven and Hell [lit. Hell and Heaven]) (1968), a pseudo-documentary about wild sexual activity and other behaviour in Sweden. The song accompanied a scene in the film set in a sauna which gave its original title "Viva la Sauna Svedese" (Hooray for the Swedish Sauna).
 
2012-12-22 06:18:25 AM

omeganuepsilon: 100 Watt Walrus: Full disclosure: I do know quite a few who do say "axe." (It's kinda inevitable living in Oakland.) Most of them are intelligent people, and it's just something leftover from their childhoods.

From my earlier link:

Metathesis is responsible for some common speech errors, such as children acquiring spaghetti as pasketti. The pronunciation /ˈæsk/ for ask, now considered standard, descends from a northern version of the verb that in most midland and southern texts through the 1500s was spelled with "x" or "cs", showing pronunciation as /ˈæks/. Chaucer, Caxton, and the Coverdale Bible use "ax"; Shakespeare and the King James Bible have "ask"


I did not know that. That's fascinating!
 
2012-12-22 06:20:53 AM

LDM90: Rotisserary
Expresso


s1.hubimg.com "I was going to make espresso!"
 
2012-12-22 06:23:52 AM
Laboratory is where you go to warsh your hands, right?
 
2012-12-22 06:24:58 AM

LDM90: Laboratory is where you go to warsh your hands, right?


and you can look at the pitcher on the wall while you're in there.
 
2012-12-22 06:26:46 AM
This is redonkulous
 
2012-12-22 06:30:35 AM

buckler: I had a kid whose speech was all kind of farked up at six, because his mom thought his mispronunciations were 'cute'. He made some really bizarre sound substitutions. When he asked for a drink, he'd say "I bant a sink of bawter." It took him years to overcome it.


readsq.com

"May I mambo dogface to the banana patch?"

/get that kid a "special" test

Mad_Radhu: One really common mispronounced word is forte, which is really pronounced like "fort". Of course, if you do pronounce it correctly, people will think you are an idiot.


Linguistics is one of my personal louds.

omeganuepsilon: If you have a serious problem with it, don't move to the southern US.


Imma gonna 'gree with y'all on that point.

kellythecat: what about bagel?


Maybe it's because I grew up mostly in NYC, but for some reason it farking kills me when people from the west coast say "Beggle". And even though I know it's a large portion of the country that does this, I can't understand why people think that "Merry" "Marry" and "Mary" are homophones.

Medical, Matter, Mason.
Merry, marry, Mary. How hard is that?
 
2012-12-22 06:31:14 AM

o'really: My southern (california) fam sez "vy-een-a" sausages for vienna sausages, those little things that come in a can. And "pee-can" for pecan. Those pronunciations makes me happy.


Many people here pronounce it Vy-ee-nee.
 
2012-12-22 06:34:16 AM
Surprised "succinct" was not on there, because I think I've heard this pronounced correctly maybe once or twice ever. People usually say "suh-sinked" instead of "suck-sinked".

Enjoyed finding I've been pronouncing "forte" and "grimace" incorrectly (sort of).
 
2012-12-22 06:34:16 AM

100 Watt Walrus: omeganuepsilon: 100 Watt Walrus: Full disclosure: I do know quite a few who do say "axe." (It's kinda inevitable living in Oakland.) Most of them are intelligent people, and it's just something leftover from their childhoods.

From my earlier link:

Metathesis is responsible for some common speech errors, such as children acquiring spaghetti as pasketti. The pronunciation /ˈæsk/ for ask, now considered standard, descends from a northern version of the verb that in most midland and southern texts through the 1500s was spelled with "x" or "cs", showing pronunciation as /ˈæks/. Chaucer, Caxton, and the Coverdale Bible use "ax"; Shakespeare and the King James Bible have "ask"

I did not know that. That's fascinating!


That's what I thought, but didn't want to add it onto an already rambling post.

It appears as if it's the human brain at work, most of us simply do what we learn, but you get an outlier that metathesizes(Yeah, I just totally made up a word) something and it catches on and spreads, and it goes back and forth with specific sounds( axe ask). IE those specific sounds are more easily metathesized, but in both directions.
 
2012-12-22 06:37:27 AM

omeganuepsilon: Hand Banana: I've seen quite a few people saying and writing it as prolly and it drives me crazy.

I say "howdy", "yall", "yonder" "prolly", almost as a joke, because language is fun to play with and it never hurts to be ridiculus on occasion. It's when people only speak that way and are incapable of sounding intelligent, that's when it's gotten ridiculous.


What's wrong with yonder? Perfectly good, correctly pronounced word.
 
2012-12-22 06:38:31 AM
Even though it's correct I don't think I could pronounce forte as fort and I don't know anyone who does. It just sounds weird and hardly anyone would know what you were talking about. I think this is one of those cases where we need to accept that the accepted pronunciation has changed.
 
2012-12-22 06:40:31 AM
That is a song I have not been able to escape on the internet for at least 12 years now.
 
2012-12-22 06:40:54 AM
I personally like native-Hindi speakers' pronunciation of the title of those who create software - "devil-uppers" with the accent on "up." Rather fitting I think.
 
2012-12-22 06:43:51 AM
I'm in nuclear power and I say nukeyoular. It seems regional honestly. Accents and whatnot.
Of course sometimes I accidently say "Missourruh" to the endless amusement of coworkers..
 
2012-12-22 06:50:27 AM

ChildOfBhaal: omeganuepsilon: Hand Banana: I've seen quite a few people saying and writing it as prolly and it drives me crazy.

I say "howdy", "yall", "yonder" "prolly", almost as a joke, because language is fun to play with and it never hurts to be ridiculus on occasion. It's when people only speak that way and are incapable of sounding intelligent, that's when it's gotten ridiculous.

What's wrong with yonder? Perfectly good, correctly pronounced word.


Good, not so much.

Yes, it's a valid word, as many are, that people still would rather not use or have said to them. It's got that redneck hillbilly stigma. It's not just the accent, it's the sound of the word. A vast amount of people that say it sound like they don't like to read berks, not even gersberms

i0.kym-cdn.com
 
2012-12-22 06:50:51 AM
Western Pennsylvania home of :

Wash = Warsh
Dahn Tahn = Downtown
Gint = Giant

Pittsburghese is a plague on the English language.
 
2012-12-22 06:51:20 AM
Stoopid peeple:

click
aluminum
congradulations


Normal people:

clique
aluminium
congratulations
 
2012-12-22 06:54:05 AM
assessory (doesn't bother me)
criteria as the singular (pet peeve)
 
2012-12-22 07:00:57 AM

Teela: Realtor - reel a tor


It's pronounced "asshole psychopath lying scum shiatbag".
 
2012-12-22 07:04:13 AM

Ringshadow: I'm in nuclear power and I say nukeyoular. It seems regional honestly. Accents and whatnot.
Of course sometimes I accidently say "Missourruh" to the endless amusement of coworkers..


I've got a nephew in-law who will flip out if you pronounce "Oregon" the way it's spelled instead of "Orgin" (similar to people turning pen into pin)
He's not even from there, he's from Nevada.

Bush aside, who deserves being ripped on for every little thing, I don't mind nuculear as a pronunciation. As I talked about above, it is regional to a point, but there is a logic behind it catching on as such.

nuclear → nucular /ˈnjuːkjələr/ (re-analysed as nuke + -cular suffix in particular, binocular)

also
Molecular. Vernacular, Macular, etc.

A lot of people don't get that there's a reason these things make sense and spread, and they simply chalk it up to simple ignorance. Almost ironic, that.
 
2012-12-22 07:05:35 AM

omeganuepsilon: It's got that redneck hillbilly stigma.


Now that depends on whether it's used as an adverb or an adjective..

That there donkey over yonder... = Hillbilly

My lady in yonder meadow = British homosexual (NTTAWWT)

Alassra: Pittsburghese is a plague on the English language.


Do people there also "outen the lights"? Or drop "to be", as in "the dishes need warshed"?
 
2012-12-22 07:06:15 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: Teela: Realtor - reel a tor

It's pronounced "asshole psychopath lying scum shiatbag".


That's "asshole SOCIOpath lying scum shiatbag".

Regional pronunciations being what they are.
 
2012-12-22 07:07:11 AM
My favorite British pronunciation is urinal:

http://howjsay.com/index.php?word=urinal&submit=Submit
 
2012-12-22 07:07:33 AM
Drawer.

As in 'drawer me a picture'

But enough of all this. What's with the superfluous 'u'? Flavour, colour, blouwjob, etc.

Typing takes long enough already without adding unnecessary letters.
 
2012-12-22 07:08:50 AM
fark you subby, I had that song stuck in my head for WEEKS after UBL was killed...
 
2012-12-22 07:10:20 AM
Neither my mother, my daughter nor my step daughter can pronounce 'specific'. I did have some fun with them one night a couple of years ago videoing them attempting not to say 'Pacific', but it descended into a chaos of giggles and laughter and a night well spent!
There's another word that none of them get right and I can't remember what that is right now, but it's got the same level of hilarity attached to it.

/read the family dictionary a lot when I was little
//Scrabble... one of my favourite games.
 
2012-12-22 07:11:03 AM
Personal pet peeve this time of year; singers who say "Sanna" for Santa Claus.
Just curious; how many people say the "h" in herb?
 
2012-12-22 07:11:07 AM
I am always amazed at the number of words I mispronounce. I think it's because most of my vocabulary comes from reading rather than hearing. howjsay scares me.
 
Displayed 50 of 381 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report