If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Mirror.co.uk)   10 most commonly mispronounced words. One of them is "phenomenon." (♫ do doooooo, do do do ♫) "Phenomenon." (♫ do do do do ♫) "Phenomenon." (♫ do dooooooo, do do do, do do do, do do do, do do do, do-do do do do-do do ♫)   (mirror.co.uk) divider line 381
    More: Interesting, English Words, University of York, Boxing Day, phenomenon  
•       •       •

18001 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Dec 2012 at 2:35 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



381 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-12-22 03:38:21 AM
"You had me until you mispronounced 'Appalachian'."
 
2012-12-22 03:39:37 AM
you know if i had a big box of crayons and some poster board, i could make the perfect graph and then recreate it on etch a sketch to prove my point.

but that is way to much work for me to do right now.
 
2012-12-22 03:40:44 AM

yourmomlovestetris: One of my personal word pet peeves are people who use the word "disorientated" instead of "disoriented". Why add the extra syllable? It seems like just a waste. It's irritating...


Preventative instead of preventive. I guess preventative medicine would serve to preventate some disease.
 
2012-12-22 03:42:07 AM

fusillade762: Phenomenon, remuneration and statistics have topped a list of the most commonly mispronounced English words.

Speakers also have a problem getting their tongue around ethnicity, hereditary and particularly

Really?  Must be a Brit thing, because I don't know anyone who has problems with those words.  Maybe "remuneration" (I switch the M and N when I say that in my head).  Though I do want to cockpunch people who say "orientate".


i mangle particularly - that first L just disappears, and i drop a syllable. it's not like i can't pronounce it correctly, but doing so always causes a mental clutch popping that has me stammering like Rain Man in a strip club, so i just plow on and mispronounce it anyway.
 
2012-12-22 03:45:48 AM
I worked with a lady who used to say "uninundates" (that's four syllables) instead of "inundate." Drove me nuts.

My aunt pronounces "idea" as "ideal"...with an L at the end! From context, it's clear she means "idea" but she always has that "l" at the end.
 
2012-12-22 03:48:04 AM
I think lack of or improper conjugation of verbs is the bigger problem here.
 
2012-12-22 03:48:39 AM
Irregardless!
 
2012-12-22 03:49:12 AM

yourmomlovestetris:
One of my personal word pet peeves are people who use the word "disorientated" instead of "disoriented". Why add the extra syllable? It seems like just a waste. It's irritating...


Yeah, I've heard this, too. I don't know how or why anyone would say "disorientated."
 
2012-12-22 03:50:12 AM

buckler: Nearest I can figure is "ee-yor-ik"


Seems plausible enough for me. Now I'm curious to know what the dialect must have been like way back during that time. It would be kind of interesting to know how the pronunciation of various words evolved over time.
 
2012-12-22 03:50:55 AM

Yoyo: Aluminum surprisingly absent.


See also: Link
 
2012-12-22 03:52:17 AM

Marmilman: how the fark did "York" ever have three syllables? I can't imagine how it must have been pronounced.


York is the current/modern name.

The name Eboracum was turned into Eoforwic by the Anglians in the 7th century : a compound of Eofor-, from the old name, and -wic "village". This was probably by conflation of the element Ebor- with a Germanic root *eburaz (boar); by the 7th century the Old English for 'boar' had become eofor. When the Danish army conquered the city in 866, the name became rendered as Jórvík.[13]

Jórvík was gradually reduced to York in the centuries following the Norman Conquest, moving from the Middle English Yerk in the 14th century through to Yourke in the 16th century and then Yarke in the 17th century. The form York was first recorded in the 13th century.[4][14] Many present-day names of companies and places, such as Ebor taxis and the Ebor race meeting, refer to the Roman name.[15] The Archbishop of York also uses Ebor as his surname in his signature.[16]

/from the wiki
 
2012-12-22 03:53:17 AM
And of course, the Seven Dirty Words (oh, you can pronounce them, you just can't say them (on TV, radio, or FARK))

S***
P***
F***
C***
C*********
M***********
T***

And the Bonus Three:

F***
T***
T***

For your edification (NSFW language), Part 1
For your further edification (NSFW language), Part 2
 
2012-12-22 03:56:26 AM

stu1-1: Lorelle: For Americans, the 10 words are:

Mischievous - Miss chee vee us
Jewelry - Jool ree
Library - lie berry
February - Feb you airy
Kindergarten - Kinder garden
Ask - Axe (seems to be a racial thing, not American)
Sherbet - Sure burt (is also considered correct)
Probably - Prob lee
Nuclear - Nuke you lur
Pronunciation - Pro noun see a shun


IMHO you don't speak Engrish very well!
 
2012-12-22 03:56:30 AM
♫ I say potato and you say potato. You say tomato and I say tomato. Potato, potato, tomato, tomato. Let's call the whole thing off. ♫
 
2012-12-22 04:01:59 AM
Subby you get points for headline

/unfortunately you lose some for boring story
 
2012-12-22 04:04:24 AM
So, in 1998 I was in Massachusetts, and things were feeling weird. Then I went to an Applebees. They're all decorated the same, with banners for the local school whatever team and the same wood trim, and I was feeling like I was back home.

Guy comes in "Hey Geoge, I just hadda pahk my cah."

I almost broke down laughing. It was like a test case for the accent of the area.

/Childhood speech therapist left me with a very neutral accent
//On the rare occasions when I speak.
 
2012-12-22 04:05:45 AM
Deers
 
2012-12-22 04:05:48 AM
Funny, I was sure the "interesting" tag was a play on the list. If so good jorb Subby. Because it seems like absolutely everyone says intrest and intresting instead. That extra syllable always gets swallowed. Always. Interest(ing) gets my vote for most mispronounced word(s).
 
2012-12-22 04:06:16 AM

Summercat: Marmilman: how the fark did "York" ever have three syllables? I can't imagine how it must have been pronounced.

York is the current/modern name.

The name Eboracum was turned into Eoforwic by the Anglians in the 7th century : a compound of Eofor-, from the old name, and -wic "village". This was probably by conflation of the element Ebor- with a Germanic root *eburaz (boar); by the 7th century the Old English for 'boar' had become eofor. When the Danish army conquered the city in 866, the name became rendered as Jórvík.[13]

Jórvík was gradually reduced to York in the centuries following the Norman Conquest, moving from the Middle English Yerk in the 14th century through to Yourke in the 16th century and then Yarke in the 17th century. The form York was first recorded in the 13th century.[4][14] Many present-day names of companies and places, such as Ebor taxis and the Ebor race meeting, refer to the Roman name.[15] The Archbishop of York also uses Ebor as his surname in his signature.[16]

/from the wiki


My curiosity has been satiated! Thank you so much for posting that.
 
2012-12-22 04:06:59 AM

calbert: for those who don't get it:

[images3.wikia.nocookie.net image 300x220]

Sandra Bullock

fyi, those creatures are called Snowths.

/pretty dumb headline, quite a stretch for lame pay-off.

:-/


Ohh someone has a case of smug.
 
2012-12-22 04:11:44 AM

rwfan: Funny, I was sure the "interesting" tag was a play on the list. If so good jorb Subby. Because it seems like absolutely everyone says intrest and intresting instead. That extra syllable always gets swallowed. Always. Interest(ing) gets my vote for most mispronounced word(s).


A youtube video explain what intrest is
 
2012-12-22 04:14:15 AM
I used to have a coworker that said "flustrated".  Very bright person, but they absolutely could not pronounce that first R.

My sister insisted the correct way to pronounce pronunciation was "pronounciation" right up until she finished college and got accepted to a prestigious law school.

My biggest pet peeve is chipotle, though.  It's the name of a major chain restaurant, for crying out loud.  The L comes AFTER the T.
 
2012-12-22 04:16:46 AM

Lorelle: For Americans, the 10 words are:

Mischievous
Jewelry
Library
February
Kindergarten
Ask
Sherbet
Probably
Nuclear
Pronunciation


I read that as "Jewery."

Mien fail.
 
2012-12-22 04:18:56 AM
Boughten seems to be popular, at least in the northwest...

"I have some store boughten bread"

I have a young friend who thought hyperbole was pronounced Hyper-boal

I use to tease her about it and then say I was just being facetious, but I'd pronounce it face-ti-us.

My wife and I "fight" over February.
 
2012-12-22 04:19:46 AM
Phalanx.
 
2012-12-22 04:21:40 AM

stu1-1: Thunderboy: I run into the mispronunciation of "phenomenon" (pronounced "phenomena") a lot - most recently by a Harvard graduate.

phenomenon = singular
phenomena = plural


Dayglo Brown:

"Phenomena" is the plural form of "phenomenon".


Yes. And that's why pronouncing "phenomenon" as "phenomena" is incorrect. Gold stars for both of you!
 
2012-12-22 04:22:02 AM

Marmilman:

My curiosity has been satiated! Thank you so much for posting that.


I'm used to satiating all sorts of appetities, hon ;3
 
2012-12-22 04:23:22 AM
www.thefancarpet.com
 
2012-12-22 04:23:33 AM
EYE-gore
 
2012-12-22 04:24:12 AM
I distinctly remember some school assembly back in elementary school with some guy telling some feel-good story. I don't remember what it was about, but pronounced 'Hero' as 'Hee row' with a distinct pause between the 'Hee' and the 'Row'. When he asked the audience(us), "What is a Hee Row?", there was dead silence because we weren't sure if he said 'Hero' or not.

/It's "Here-oh", idiot.
 
2012-12-22 04:26:52 AM

Romans 7 19: My wife and I "fight" over February.


You mean, Feb-you-ary?
 
2012-12-22 04:27:05 AM
The mispronunciation of "grimace" is so prevalent that most dictionaries list both the correct (long a and accent on the second syllable) and the common one (like the big purple thing in the McDonald's commercials)
 
2012-12-22 04:27:15 AM

rwfan: rwfan: Funny, I was sure the "interesting" tag was a play on the list. If so good jorb Subby. Because it seems like absolutely everyone says intrest and intresting instead. That extra syllable always gets swallowed. Always. Interest(ing) gets my vote for most mispronounced word(s).

A youtube video explain what intrest is


oh gawd.
 
2012-12-22 04:28:02 AM

Snapper Carr: The mispronunciation of "grimace" is so prevalent that most dictionaries list both the correct (long a and accent on the second syllable) and the common one (like the big purple thing in the McDonald's commercials)


I'll remember that the next time imma grippin' n' sippin'.
 
2012-12-22 04:29:48 AM
One really common mispronounced word is forte, which is really pronounced like "fort". Of course, if you do pronounce it correctly, people will think you are an idiot.
 
2012-12-22 04:30:15 AM

thisispete: Oh, and it's La-bor-a-tory, not Lab-ra-tree


It's a LABORatory, not a labORATORY.
 
2012-12-22 04:36:48 AM
Eye rack. I leave mine in.
 
2012-12-22 04:37:19 AM
Would have expected interpret to be on the list.
 
2012-12-22 04:38:10 AM
Beurau... Bureauru... fark it. For whatever reason I have never been able to spell that word
 
2012-12-22 04:38:53 AM
No joke, that song is the ringtone for my wife.
 
2012-12-22 04:41:23 AM
img11.imageshack.us
It's spelt Raymond Luxury Yach-t, but it's pronounced 'Throatwobbler Mangrove'.

/oblig.
 
2012-12-22 04:41:34 AM
I cannot hear or read the word phenomenon without the "do doooo do do" automatically echoing in my inner mind. Thanks, Muppets!

No, really, thanks. When I look back at the shows of my childhood (mid 70s - mid 80s) it really is amusing to realize how much they were influenced by a hippy trippy vibe. Scooby doo had nothing on HR Puffinstuff
 
2012-12-22 04:43:13 AM
The worst part about THAT ONE WORD YOU SIMPLY CANNOT SPELL is that's it's this odd autistic thing right out of an Oliver Sacks book. It damn near hurts to NOT be able to spell it.
 
2012-12-22 04:44:04 AM

C18H27NO3: Would have expected interpret to be on the list.


yeah only one way to say that: "enter-prat"

at least with a southern accent
 
2012-12-22 04:49:52 AM
On the more entertaining side, my sister and I once convinced a friend that the word was "sophiskatated."

To this day, he's probably saying it that way.

Sophiskatated.
 
2012-12-22 05:01:10 AM
de doo doo doo de da da da

that's all I want to say to you
 
2012-12-22 05:04:18 AM
British people sound dumb.
 
2012-12-22 05:06:54 AM
what about bagel?
 
2012-12-22 05:06:54 AM
If everyone pronounces it wrong, isn't it more true that the "correct" pronunciation is no longer correct?
 
2012-12-22 05:06:55 AM

Cheese eating surrender monkey: [img11.imageshack.us image 475x355]
It's spelt Raymond Luxury Yach-t, but it's pronounced 'Throatwobbler Mangrove'.

/oblig.


You're a silly man, and I'm not going to interview you.
 
Displayed 50 of 381 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report