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(Mirror.co.uk)   10 most commonly mispronounced words. One of them is "phenomenon." (♫ do doooooo, do do do ♫) "Phenomenon." (♫ do do do do ♫) "Phenomenon." (♫ do dooooooo, do do do, do do do, do do do, do do do, do-do do do do-do do ♫)   (mirror.co.uk) divider line 381
    More: Interesting, English Words, University of York, Boxing Day, phenomenon  
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18019 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Dec 2012 at 2:35 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
 
2012-12-21 09:55:26 PM  
It took you 10 minutes to type that headline subby. Admit it.
 
2012-12-22 12:46:35 AM  
Headline of the year winner right here. My only vote goes to this, because I laughed until I cried.
 
2012-12-22 01:13:29 AM  
well played, submitter.
 
2012-12-22 01:16:16 AM  
Phenomenon, remuneration and statistics have topped a list of the most commonly mispronounced English words.

Speakers also have a problem getting their tongue around ethnicity, hereditary and particularly


Really?  Must be a Brit thing, because I don't know anyone who has problems with those words.  Maybe "remuneration" (I switch the M and N when I say that in my head).  Though I do want to cockpunch people who say "orientate".
 
2012-12-22 01:43:11 AM  
For Americans, the 10 words are:

Mischievous
Jewelry
Library
February
Kindergarten
Ask
Sherbet
Probably
Nuclear
Pronunciation
 
2012-12-22 02:06:57 AM  

Lorelle: For Americans, the 10 words are:

Mischievous

- Miss chee vee us
Jewelry - Jool ree
Library - lie berry
February - Feb you airy
Kindergarten - Kinder garden
Ask - Axe (seems to be a racial thing, not American)
Sherbet - Sure burt (is also considered correct)
Probably - Prob lee
Nuclear - Nuke you lur
Pronunciation - Pro noun see a shun
 
2012-12-22 02:17:42 AM  
 Around these parts they pronounce elementary as LMN tarry. It's because the average education stops right about there.
 
2012-12-22 02:28:56 AM  
 
2012-12-22 02:36:59 AM  
www.mtg-images.de

It's pronounced "Phenom"
 
2012-12-22 02:39:25 AM  
I'm still trying to figure out what they're saying, if they're saying these words wrong. I don't know if I've ever heard anyone mispronounce any of these.

/to be fair, I don't think I've ever heard anyone say "remuneration," either way.
 
2012-12-22 02:40:35 AM  

stu1-1: [img850.imageshack.us image 578x343]

Link


*slaps head*

I completely forgot about that. My childhood memories are fading away, sadly enough.
 
2012-12-22 02:41:19 AM  
"And most people talk about 'Febry' and 'Wensday'."

I'm having a hard time wrapping my mind around Febry.
 
2012-12-22 02:43:12 AM  
Realtor - reel a tor
Supposedly - supposably
 
2012-12-22 02:45:05 AM  
Phenomenon reminds me a lot more of this (for good or for bad)

Funk Phenomenon
 
2012-12-22 02:47:18 AM  
+1 to subby.
 
2012-12-22 02:50:18 AM  

Forbidden Doughnut: stu1-1: [img850.imageshack.us image 578x343]

Link

*slaps head*

I completely forgot about that. My childhood memories are fading away, sadly enough.


They also make a cameo appearance in Bohemian Rhapsody
Link
 
2012-12-22 02:51:41 AM  
for those who don't get it:

images3.wikia.nocookie.net

Sandra Bullock

fyi, those creatures are called Snowths.

/pretty dumb headline, quite a stretch for lame pay-off.

:-/
 
2012-12-22 02:51:44 AM  
A while back I had a conference call with a team in India and one of the guys pronounced "competitors", "com pet teet er". I had to jump fast and hit the mute button so he wouldn't hear me laugh.

/why this kolaveri di?
 
2012-12-22 02:52:45 AM  
I run into the mispronunciation of "phenomenon" (pronounced "phenomena") a lot - most recently by a Harvard graduate.
 
2012-12-22 02:54:27 AM  
Let us not judge those who cannot pronounce words. Let us instead pass judgement on those who cannot spell!

:-D
 
2012-12-22 02:55:57 AM  
Excavator.
 
2012-12-22 02:56:19 AM  
people that say "fusstrating" for "frustrating" make me want to shoot an endangered creature in the middle of it mating....right before the little critter climaxes.
 
2012-12-22 02:56:51 AM  
images4.wikia.nocookie.net

The question is... who cares?
 
2012-12-22 02:57:54 AM  
You know, I was going to have a good sneer, but then I wondered if the third syllable of "processes" is pronounced "sees" or "says". Now I'm full of self doubt.
 
2012-12-22 02:59:34 AM  
how the fark did "York" ever have three syllables? I can't imagine how it must have been pronounced.
 
2012-12-22 02:59:58 AM  

Lorelle: For Americans, the 10 words are:

Mischievous
Jewelry
Library
February
Kindergarten
Ask
Sherbet
Probably
Nuclear
Pronunciation


Wow, that's pacific.
 
2012-12-22 03:01:00 AM  
Fronk-n-steen
 
2012-12-22 03:01:03 AM  
 
2012-12-22 03:01:21 AM  
Come on, how many Americans actually use those words? You need something more than a 5th grade education to even know what half those words means. Most people k ow what potato is.

The one that bugs the shiat outta me is "rediculous". Get it right god damn it!
 
2012-12-22 03:02:12 AM  

Thunderboy: I run into the mispronunciation of "phenomenon" (pronounced "phenomena") a lot - most recently by a Harvard graduate.


phenomenon = singular
phenomena = plural
 
2012-12-22 03:02:26 AM  

Marmilman: how the fark did "York" ever have three syllables? I can't imagine how it must have been pronounced.


"I-am-Sofa-King Wee-Todd-Did"
 
2012-12-22 03:02:53 AM  
One of the difficulties of 12-step programs is learning to pronounce anonymity
 
2012-12-22 03:04:53 AM  

Thunderboy: I run into the mispronunciation of "phenomenon" (pronounced "phenomena") a lot - most recently by a Harvard graduate.


"Phenomena" is the plural form of "phenomenon".
 
2012-12-22 03:08:42 AM  

stu1-1: [img850.imageshack.us image 578x343]


I prefer the original.

farm9.staticflickr.com
 
2012-12-22 03:08:45 AM  
How about "dudn't" instead of "doesn't"? My mom says it like that constantly and it is ridiculously grating to my ears.

I also had a strong urge to slap a friend when I discovered that, not only did she say "probly" rather than "probably", she thought it was spelled that way too.
 
2012-12-22 03:10:45 AM  

pedobearapproved: Marmilman: how the fark did "York" ever have three syllables? I can't imagine how it must have been pronounced.

"I-am-Sofa-King Wee-Todd-Did"


I don't get it. That sounds like "I am so farking retarded." I'm looking for the three syllable version of "York."
 
2012-12-22 03:10:47 AM  
There are words you read, which you know the meaning of, but you have no idea of the pronunciation. I was slightly disappointed when I saw an art documentary and found Titian is pronounced "Ti-shan" and not "Titty-an". " Paradigm" troubled me for a while, too, until I heard it in a lecture.
 
2012-12-22 03:11:01 AM  
Warsh.
 
2012-12-22 03:12:30 AM  
Oh, and it's La-bor-a-tory, not Lab-ra-tree
 
2012-12-22 03:17:00 AM  

thisispete: Oh, and it's La-bor-a-tory, not Lab-ra-tree


I (mis)pronounce that as "Lab-ra-tory"...
 
2012-12-22 03:17:50 AM  

thisispete: Oh, and it's La-bor-a-tory, not Lab-ra-tree


I know the correct way to say it but I never use it but I don't use your wrong way either...

Lab-ra-tory
 
2012-12-22 03:18:15 AM  
Subby needs to lay off the Geritol.
 
2012-12-22 03:19:29 AM  

Forbidden Doughnut: thisispete: Oh, and it's La-bor-a-tory, not Lab-ra-tree

I (mis)pronounce that as "Lab-ra-tory"...




Me too. But I'm trying to work on it. At least when I'm conscious of it.
 
2012-12-22 03:22:05 AM  


cf.drafthouse.com

It's pronounced Fronkensteen
 
2012-12-22 03:22:35 AM  

pedobearapproved: people that say "fusstrating" for "frustrating" make me want to shoot an endangered creature in the middle of it mating....right before the little critter climaxes.


My Mom says that. Fusstrates. It sucks because it makes her seem less intelligent than she really is; she's a smart and incredibly creative person. I think mispronunciations like these could be a holdover from childhood; I doubt she was corrected on it. Some parents think things like that are "cute". My ex-boyfriend's Mom didn't seek out therapy after my ex developed a lisp due to smacking his mouth when he was a toddler. Developmental complications from injuries are just adorable!
 
2012-12-22 03:23:58 AM  

Marmilman: pedobearapproved: Marmilman: how the fark did "York" ever have three syllables? I can't imagine how it must have been pronounced.

"I-am-Sofa-King Wee-Todd-Did"

I don't get it. That sounds like "I am so farking retarded." I'm looking for the three syllable version of "York."


Nearest I can figure is "ee-yor-ik"
 
2012-12-22 03:25:17 AM  
Lately I've heard people pronouncing the word "saccharine" with a "ch as in chair" sound. I've also heard people say the word "prevalent" as "pre-VAY-lent", not "PREH-va-lent". Have these alternate ways to pronounce these words always existed or are these just instances of clueless internet folks trying to use words they've only read and not heard before?

One of my personal word pet peeves are people who use the word "disorientated" instead of "disoriented". Why add the extra syllable? It seems like just a waste. It's irritating...
 
2012-12-22 03:27:19 AM  

weiner dog: pedobearapproved: people that say "fusstrating" for "frustrating" make me want to shoot an endangered creature in the middle of it mating....right before the little critter climaxes.

My Mom says that. Fusstrates. It sucks because it makes her seem less intelligent than she really is; she's a smart and incredibly creative person. I think mispronunciations like these could be a holdover from childhood; I doubt she was corrected on it. Some parents think things like that are "cute". My ex-boyfriend's Mom didn't seek out therapy after my ex developed a lisp due to smacking his mouth when he was a toddler. Developmental complications from injuries are just adorable!


I had a kid whose speech was all kind of farked up at six, because his mom thought his mispronunciations were 'cute'. He made some really bizarre sound substitutions. When he asked for a drink, he'd say "I bant a sink of bawter." It took him years to overcome it.
 
2012-12-22 03:33:08 AM  
Aluminum surprisingly absent.
 
2012-12-22 03:35:32 AM  

yourmomlovestetris: Lately I've heard people pronouncing the word "saccharine" with a "ch as in chair" sound. I've also heard people say the word "prevalent" as "pre-VAY-lent", not "PREH-va-lent". Have these alternate ways to pronounce these words always existed or are these just instances of clueless internet folks trying to use words they've only read and not heard before?

One of my personal word pet peeves are people who use the word "disorientated" instead of "disoriented". Why add the extra syllable? It seems like just a waste. It's irritating...


I have the same issue with "cheater" being used instead of "cheat", which is both a noun and a verb. I can see why it's used that way, though.
 
2012-12-22 03:38:21 AM  
"You had me until you mispronounced 'Appalachian'."
 
2012-12-22 03:39:37 AM  
you know if i had a big box of crayons and some poster board, i could make the perfect graph and then recreate it on etch a sketch to prove my point.

but that is way to much work for me to do right now.
 
2012-12-22 03:40:44 AM  

yourmomlovestetris: One of my personal word pet peeves are people who use the word "disorientated" instead of "disoriented". Why add the extra syllable? It seems like just a waste. It's irritating...


Preventative instead of preventive. I guess preventative medicine would serve to preventate some disease.
 
2012-12-22 03:42:07 AM  

fusillade762: Phenomenon, remuneration and statistics have topped a list of the most commonly mispronounced English words.

Speakers also have a problem getting their tongue around ethnicity, hereditary and particularly

Really?  Must be a Brit thing, because I don't know anyone who has problems with those words.  Maybe "remuneration" (I switch the M and N when I say that in my head).  Though I do want to cockpunch people who say "orientate".


i mangle particularly - that first L just disappears, and i drop a syllable. it's not like i can't pronounce it correctly, but doing so always causes a mental clutch popping that has me stammering like Rain Man in a strip club, so i just plow on and mispronounce it anyway.
 
2012-12-22 03:45:48 AM  
I worked with a lady who used to say "uninundates" (that's four syllables) instead of "inundate." Drove me nuts.

My aunt pronounces "idea" as "ideal"...with an L at the end! From context, it's clear she means "idea" but she always has that "l" at the end.
 
2012-12-22 03:48:04 AM  
I think lack of or improper conjugation of verbs is the bigger problem here.
 
2012-12-22 03:48:39 AM  
Irregardless!
 
2012-12-22 03:49:12 AM  

yourmomlovestetris:
One of my personal word pet peeves are people who use the word "disorientated" instead of "disoriented". Why add the extra syllable? It seems like just a waste. It's irritating...


Yeah, I've heard this, too. I don't know how or why anyone would say "disorientated."
 
2012-12-22 03:50:12 AM  

buckler: Nearest I can figure is "ee-yor-ik"


Seems plausible enough for me. Now I'm curious to know what the dialect must have been like way back during that time. It would be kind of interesting to know how the pronunciation of various words evolved over time.
 
2012-12-22 03:50:55 AM  

Yoyo: Aluminum surprisingly absent.


See also: Link
 
2012-12-22 03:52:17 AM  

Marmilman: how the fark did "York" ever have three syllables? I can't imagine how it must have been pronounced.


York is the current/modern name.

The name Eboracum was turned into Eoforwic by the Anglians in the 7th century : a compound of Eofor-, from the old name, and -wic "village". This was probably by conflation of the element Ebor- with a Germanic root *eburaz (boar); by the 7th century the Old English for 'boar' had become eofor. When the Danish army conquered the city in 866, the name became rendered as Jórvík.[13]

Jórvík was gradually reduced to York in the centuries following the Norman Conquest, moving from the Middle English Yerk in the 14th century through to Yourke in the 16th century and then Yarke in the 17th century. The form York was first recorded in the 13th century.[4][14] Many present-day names of companies and places, such as Ebor taxis and the Ebor race meeting, refer to the Roman name.[15] The Archbishop of York also uses Ebor as his surname in his signature.[16]

/from the wiki
 
2012-12-22 03:53:17 AM  
And of course, the Seven Dirty Words (oh, you can pronounce them, you just can't say them (on TV, radio, or FARK))

S***
P***
F***
C***
C*********
M***********
T***

And the Bonus Three:

F***
T***
T***

For your edification (NSFW language), Part 1
For your further edification (NSFW language), Part 2
 
2012-12-22 03:56:26 AM  

stu1-1: Lorelle: For Americans, the 10 words are:

Mischievous - Miss chee vee us
Jewelry - Jool ree
Library - lie berry
February - Feb you airy
Kindergarten - Kinder garden
Ask - Axe (seems to be a racial thing, not American)
Sherbet - Sure burt (is also considered correct)
Probably - Prob lee
Nuclear - Nuke you lur
Pronunciation - Pro noun see a shun


IMHO you don't speak Engrish very well!
 
2012-12-22 03:56:30 AM  
♫ I say potato and you say potato. You say tomato and I say tomato. Potato, potato, tomato, tomato. Let's call the whole thing off. ♫
 
2012-12-22 04:01:59 AM  
Subby you get points for headline

/unfortunately you lose some for boring story
 
2012-12-22 04:04:24 AM  
So, in 1998 I was in Massachusetts, and things were feeling weird. Then I went to an Applebees. They're all decorated the same, with banners for the local school whatever team and the same wood trim, and I was feeling like I was back home.

Guy comes in "Hey Geoge, I just hadda pahk my cah."

I almost broke down laughing. It was like a test case for the accent of the area.

/Childhood speech therapist left me with a very neutral accent
//On the rare occasions when I speak.
 
2012-12-22 04:05:45 AM  
Deers
 
2012-12-22 04:05:48 AM  
Funny, I was sure the "interesting" tag was a play on the list. If so good jorb Subby. Because it seems like absolutely everyone says intrest and intresting instead. That extra syllable always gets swallowed. Always. Interest(ing) gets my vote for most mispronounced word(s).
 
2012-12-22 04:06:16 AM  

Summercat: Marmilman: how the fark did "York" ever have three syllables? I can't imagine how it must have been pronounced.

York is the current/modern name.

The name Eboracum was turned into Eoforwic by the Anglians in the 7th century : a compound of Eofor-, from the old name, and -wic "village". This was probably by conflation of the element Ebor- with a Germanic root *eburaz (boar); by the 7th century the Old English for 'boar' had become eofor. When the Danish army conquered the city in 866, the name became rendered as Jórvík.[13]

Jórvík was gradually reduced to York in the centuries following the Norman Conquest, moving from the Middle English Yerk in the 14th century through to Yourke in the 16th century and then Yarke in the 17th century. The form York was first recorded in the 13th century.[4][14] Many present-day names of companies and places, such as Ebor taxis and the Ebor race meeting, refer to the Roman name.[15] The Archbishop of York also uses Ebor as his surname in his signature.[16]

/from the wiki


My curiosity has been satiated! Thank you so much for posting that.
 
2012-12-22 04:06:59 AM  

calbert: for those who don't get it:

[images3.wikia.nocookie.net image 300x220]

Sandra Bullock

fyi, those creatures are called Snowths.

/pretty dumb headline, quite a stretch for lame pay-off.

:-/


Ohh someone has a case of smug.
 
2012-12-22 04:11:44 AM  

rwfan: Funny, I was sure the "interesting" tag was a play on the list. If so good jorb Subby. Because it seems like absolutely everyone says intrest and intresting instead. That extra syllable always gets swallowed. Always. Interest(ing) gets my vote for most mispronounced word(s).


A youtube video explain what intrest is
 
2012-12-22 04:14:15 AM  
I used to have a coworker that said "flustrated".  Very bright person, but they absolutely could not pronounce that first R.

My sister insisted the correct way to pronounce pronunciation was "pronounciation" right up until she finished college and got accepted to a prestigious law school.

My biggest pet peeve is chipotle, though.  It's the name of a major chain restaurant, for crying out loud.  The L comes AFTER the T.
 
2012-12-22 04:16:46 AM  

Lorelle: For Americans, the 10 words are:

Mischievous
Jewelry
Library
February
Kindergarten
Ask
Sherbet
Probably
Nuclear
Pronunciation


I read that as "Jewery."

Mien fail.
 
2012-12-22 04:18:56 AM  
Boughten seems to be popular, at least in the northwest...

"I have some store boughten bread"

I have a young friend who thought hyperbole was pronounced Hyper-boal

I use to tease her about it and then say I was just being facetious, but I'd pronounce it face-ti-us.

My wife and I "fight" over February.
 
2012-12-22 04:19:46 AM  
Phalanx.
 
2012-12-22 04:21:40 AM  

stu1-1: Thunderboy: I run into the mispronunciation of "phenomenon" (pronounced "phenomena") a lot - most recently by a Harvard graduate.

phenomenon = singular
phenomena = plural


Dayglo Brown:

"Phenomena" is the plural form of "phenomenon".


Yes. And that's why pronouncing "phenomenon" as "phenomena" is incorrect. Gold stars for both of you!
 
2012-12-22 04:22:02 AM  

Marmilman:

My curiosity has been satiated! Thank you so much for posting that.


I'm used to satiating all sorts of appetities, hon ;3
 
2012-12-22 04:23:22 AM  
www.thefancarpet.com
 
2012-12-22 04:23:33 AM  
EYE-gore
 
2012-12-22 04:24:12 AM  
I distinctly remember some school assembly back in elementary school with some guy telling some feel-good story. I don't remember what it was about, but pronounced 'Hero' as 'Hee row' with a distinct pause between the 'Hee' and the 'Row'. When he asked the audience(us), "What is a Hee Row?", there was dead silence because we weren't sure if he said 'Hero' or not.

/It's "Here-oh", idiot.
 
2012-12-22 04:26:52 AM  

Romans 7 19: My wife and I "fight" over February.


You mean, Feb-you-ary?
 
2012-12-22 04:27:05 AM  
The mispronunciation of "grimace" is so prevalent that most dictionaries list both the correct (long a and accent on the second syllable) and the common one (like the big purple thing in the McDonald's commercials)
 
2012-12-22 04:27:15 AM  

rwfan: rwfan: Funny, I was sure the "interesting" tag was a play on the list. If so good jorb Subby. Because it seems like absolutely everyone says intrest and intresting instead. That extra syllable always gets swallowed. Always. Interest(ing) gets my vote for most mispronounced word(s).

A youtube video explain what intrest is


oh gawd.
 
2012-12-22 04:28:02 AM  

Snapper Carr: The mispronunciation of "grimace" is so prevalent that most dictionaries list both the correct (long a and accent on the second syllable) and the common one (like the big purple thing in the McDonald's commercials)


I'll remember that the next time imma grippin' n' sippin'.
 
2012-12-22 04:29:48 AM  
One really common mispronounced word is forte, which is really pronounced like "fort". Of course, if you do pronounce it correctly, people will think you are an idiot.
 
2012-12-22 04:30:15 AM  

thisispete: Oh, and it's La-bor-a-tory, not Lab-ra-tree


It's a LABORatory, not a labORATORY.
 
2012-12-22 04:36:48 AM  
Eye rack. I leave mine in.
 
2012-12-22 04:37:19 AM  
Would have expected interpret to be on the list.
 
2012-12-22 04:38:10 AM  
Beurau... Bureauru... fark it. For whatever reason I have never been able to spell that word
 
2012-12-22 04:38:53 AM  
No joke, that song is the ringtone for my wife.
 
2012-12-22 04:41:23 AM  
img11.imageshack.us
It's spelt Raymond Luxury Yach-t, but it's pronounced 'Throatwobbler Mangrove'.

/oblig.
 
2012-12-22 04:41:34 AM  
I cannot hear or read the word phenomenon without the "do doooo do do" automatically echoing in my inner mind. Thanks, Muppets!

No, really, thanks. When I look back at the shows of my childhood (mid 70s - mid 80s) it really is amusing to realize how much they were influenced by a hippy trippy vibe. Scooby doo had nothing on HR Puffinstuff
 
2012-12-22 04:43:13 AM  
The worst part about THAT ONE WORD YOU SIMPLY CANNOT SPELL is that's it's this odd autistic thing right out of an Oliver Sacks book. It damn near hurts to NOT be able to spell it.
 
2012-12-22 04:44:04 AM  

C18H27NO3: Would have expected interpret to be on the list.


yeah only one way to say that: "enter-prat"

at least with a southern accent
 
2012-12-22 04:49:52 AM  
On the more entertaining side, my sister and I once convinced a friend that the word was "sophiskatated."

To this day, he's probably saying it that way.

Sophiskatated.
 
2012-12-22 05:01:10 AM  
de doo doo doo de da da da

that's all I want to say to you
 
2012-12-22 05:04:18 AM  
British people sound dumb.
 
2012-12-22 05:06:54 AM  
what about bagel?
 
2012-12-22 05:06:54 AM  
If everyone pronounces it wrong, isn't it more true that the "correct" pronunciation is no longer correct?
 
2012-12-22 05:06:55 AM  

Cheese eating surrender monkey: [img11.imageshack.us image 475x355]
It's spelt Raymond Luxury Yach-t, but it's pronounced 'Throatwobbler Mangrove'.

/oblig.


You're a silly man, and I'm not going to interview you.
 
2012-12-22 05:09:02 AM  

Omahawg: de doo doo doo de da da da

that's all I want to say to you


I'm Blue da ba dee da ba die da ba dee da ba die da ba dee da ba die da ba dee da ba die da ba dee da ba die da ba dee da ba die da ba dee da ba die...
 
2012-12-22 05:09:15 AM  

Summercat: Marmilman:

My curiosity has been satiated! Thank you so much for posting that.

I'm used to satiating all sorts of appetities, hon ;3


Challenge Accepted :)
 
2012-12-22 05:18:35 AM  
I'm drunk a lot so lots of words are hard for me. Statistics is one I fark up all the time along with specific and inexplicable. It's totally not embarrassing at all though.
 
2012-12-22 05:21:30 AM  

Marmilman: Summercat: Marmilman:

My curiosity has been satiated! Thank you so much for posting that.

I'm used to satiating all sorts of appetities, hon ;3

Challenge Accepted :)


Im a furry and former otaku. have seen everything both fandoms have had to offer.

Hit me.
 
2012-12-22 05:24:10 AM  

fusillade762: Phenomenon, remuneration and statistics have topped a list of the most commonly mispronounced English words.

Speakers also have a problem getting their tongue around ethnicity, hereditary and particularly

Really?  Must be a Brit thing, because I don't know anyone who has problems with those words.  Maybe "remuneration" (I switch the M and N when I say that in my head).  Though I do want to cockpunch people who say "orientate".


That's because some Britons take it to an extreme. They don't speak the language so much as chew it up and spit it out.
/Stewie
Sure, our stateside southerners and other regions do the same thing, but really, some Brits make an artform out of being unintelligible.

Remunerate.

The problem lies in that we don't have many "mun" sort of words. Money, and numbers.
Renumerate would actually make sense in place of that because it's compensation via a numerical standard, ie money.
It's an odd phenomenon, especially when you consider the similarity of characters, m , n , and u. All the verticals in sequence are harder to scan at a glance.
Similar to "rn" looking like "m", in some typesets/fonts it's virtually indistinguishable, and a very common thing for OCR to read the wrong way.

I say hell with it, and change it around to renum' officially(or both being legit). No point in taking everyone to task for it, it's become a common error because it's more fluid and memorable.
 
2012-12-22 05:26:00 AM  

milkyshirt: How about "dudn't" instead of "doesn't"? My mom says it like that constantly and it is ridiculously grating to my ears.

I also had a strong urge to slap a friend when I discovered that, not only did she say "probly" rather than "probably", she thought it was spelled that way too.


I've seen quite a few people saying and writing it as prolly and it drives me crazy.
 
2012-12-22 05:27:49 AM  

Mad_Radhu: One really common mispronounced word is forte, which is really pronounced like "fort". Of course, if you do pronounce it correctly, people will think you are an idiot.


That's probably due to the musical term, for which the correct pronunciation is the two-syllable one, I figure.
 
2012-12-22 05:30:18 AM  
I hear British people pronouncing words on the wrong syllable a lot. What's that about?
 
2012-12-22 05:30:24 AM  
Banana gun do do do do do
i108.photobucket.com
 
2012-12-22 05:31:51 AM  

stu1-1: Nuclear - Nuke you lur


Where precisely does the middle "you" come from in the spelling?

It should be "New-clear"
 
2012-12-22 05:33:07 AM  
Link

smartphone absent, it always make me want to spell idiotphone.
 
2012-12-22 05:39:39 AM  

Lee Jackson Beauregard: thisispete: Oh, and it's La-bor-a-tory, not Lab-ra-tree

It's a LABORatory, not a labORATORY.


A lay-ber-a-tory?
 
2012-12-22 05:40:05 AM  

Hand Banana: I've seen quite a few people saying and writing it as prolly and it drives me crazy.


I see a distinction there....

There are people who say it that way 24/7 and don't know better, and people who say it as a casual affectation.

I say "howdy", "yall", "yonder" "prolly", almost as a joke, because language is fun to play with and it never hurts to be ridiculus on occasion. It's when people only speak that way and are incapable of sounding intelligent, that's when it's gotten ridiculous.

If you're good you can even do it in a professional environment, as a means of displaying that you're not super serial all of the time, that you're personable and get on with people.

If you have a serious problem with it, don't move to the southern US.
 
2012-12-22 05:50:59 AM  
I only recently learned "segue" (comes up as not a word in spellcheck here...) Was pronounced "segway", and not "see-g". I'd only seen it written and figgerd it was just a word no one said out loud.

I cannot for the life of me say "arnold palmer". I sound like the governator when I attempt it.

My southern (california) fam sez "vy-een-a" sausages for vienna sausages, those little things that come in a can. And "pee-can" for pecan. Those pronunciations makes me happy.
 
2012-12-22 05:53:20 AM  

zzrhardy: stu1-1: Nuclear - Nuke you lur

Where precisely does the middle "you" come from in the spelling?

It should be "New-clear"


No.

New klee ar

from

new klee us

As for the new cue lar,
Link
 
2012-12-22 06:02:18 AM  
I agree with funny headline, but someone disapproves...

www.bubblews.com
 
2012-12-22 06:05:27 AM  

kellythecat: what about bagel?


images.hitfix.com
/baggle
 
2012-12-22 06:06:01 AM  

stu1-1: Lorelle: For Americans, the 10 words are:

Mischievous - Miss chee vee us
Jewelry - Jool ree
Library - lie berry
February - Feb you airy
Kindergarten - Kinder garden
Ask - Axe (seems to be a racial thing, not American)
Sherbet - Sure burt (is also considered correct)
Probably - Prob lee
Nuclear - Nuke you lur
Pronunciation - Pro noun see a shun


Cultural, not racial. Blacks in the UK don't pronounce "ask" incorrectly. Nor do most black people I know. And I'm willing to bet the vast majority of college-educated African-Americans pronounce it correctly.

Full disclosure: I do know quite a few who do say "axe." (It's kinda inevitable living in Oakland.) Most of them are intelligent people, and it's just something leftover from their childhoods.

Full disclosure, part 2: I mispronounce "orange juice" as "ornch juice." No idea why. It just happens. I don't mispronounce "orange" on its own.

/I also say "to tell you the truth" way, way, way, way too much, and use Smitty instead of Subby around here.
//The not-quite-Mrs. Walrus likes to tease me with, "Oh, please do. Please do tell me the truth."
///Smitty, I hate you for getting that song stuck in my head
////No I don't.
//Shut up, Walrus.
 
2012-12-22 06:08:25 AM  

o'really: I cannot for the life of me say "arnold palmer". I sound like the governator when I attempt it.


I can say arnold. Palmer has a trick, you start the "L" sound and give up half way through. You do it slow it sounds like W, but when you let it roll out it sounds right.

It like dropping a T partially off of a word. Damni(t). It's not quite a silent T, it's a half T. Not quite enunciated T like titty.
Comes from how we normalize a vowel sound after T. People who take speech class to do it "correctly" seemingly always end up enunciating a "whole" T, to include a "tuh" or "tah" sound at the end that makes them sound ridiculous.
 
2012-12-22 06:11:49 AM  

100 Watt Walrus: Full disclosure: I do know quite a few who do say "axe." (It's kinda inevitable living in Oakland.) Most of them are intelligent people, and it's just something leftover from their childhoods.


From my earlier link:

Metathesis is responsible for some common speech errors, such as children acquiring spaghetti as pasketti. The pronunciation /ˈæsk/ for ask, now considered standard, descends from a northern version of the verb that in most midland and southern texts through the 1500s was spelled with "x" or "cs", showing pronunciation as /ˈæks/. Chaucer, Caxton, and the Coverdale Bible use "ax"; Shakespeare and the King James Bible have "ask"
 
2012-12-22 06:14:49 AM  
Rotisserary
Expresso
 
2012-12-22 06:16:01 AM  

jtown: stu1-1: [img850.imageshack.us image 578x343]

I prefer the original.

[farm9.staticflickr.com image 458x360]


Because no one ever has any clue when I mention the exact same thing:

"Mah Nà Mah Nà" debuted as part of Umiliani's soundtrack for the Italian mondo film Svezia, inferno e paradiso (Sweden: Heaven and Hell [lit. Hell and Heaven]) (1968), a pseudo-documentary about wild sexual activity and other behaviour in Sweden. The song accompanied a scene in the film set in a sauna which gave its original title "Viva la Sauna Svedese" (Hooray for the Swedish Sauna).
 
2012-12-22 06:18:25 AM  

omeganuepsilon: 100 Watt Walrus: Full disclosure: I do know quite a few who do say "axe." (It's kinda inevitable living in Oakland.) Most of them are intelligent people, and it's just something leftover from their childhoods.

From my earlier link:

Metathesis is responsible for some common speech errors, such as children acquiring spaghetti as pasketti. The pronunciation /ˈæsk/ for ask, now considered standard, descends from a northern version of the verb that in most midland and southern texts through the 1500s was spelled with "x" or "cs", showing pronunciation as /ˈæks/. Chaucer, Caxton, and the Coverdale Bible use "ax"; Shakespeare and the King James Bible have "ask"


I did not know that. That's fascinating!
 
2012-12-22 06:20:53 AM  

LDM90: Rotisserary
Expresso


s1.hubimg.com "I was going to make espresso!"
 
2012-12-22 06:23:52 AM  
Laboratory is where you go to warsh your hands, right?
 
2012-12-22 06:24:58 AM  

LDM90: Laboratory is where you go to warsh your hands, right?


and you can look at the pitcher on the wall while you're in there.
 
2012-12-22 06:26:46 AM  
This is redonkulous
 
2012-12-22 06:30:35 AM  

buckler: I had a kid whose speech was all kind of farked up at six, because his mom thought his mispronunciations were 'cute'. He made some really bizarre sound substitutions. When he asked for a drink, he'd say "I bant a sink of bawter." It took him years to overcome it.


readsq.com

"May I mambo dogface to the banana patch?"

/get that kid a "special" test

Mad_Radhu: One really common mispronounced word is forte, which is really pronounced like "fort". Of course, if you do pronounce it correctly, people will think you are an idiot.


Linguistics is one of my personal louds.

omeganuepsilon: If you have a serious problem with it, don't move to the southern US.


Imma gonna 'gree with y'all on that point.

kellythecat: what about bagel?


Maybe it's because I grew up mostly in NYC, but for some reason it farking kills me when people from the west coast say "Beggle". And even though I know it's a large portion of the country that does this, I can't understand why people think that "Merry" "Marry" and "Mary" are homophones.

Medical, Matter, Mason.
Merry, marry, Mary. How hard is that?
 
2012-12-22 06:31:14 AM  

o'really: My southern (california) fam sez "vy-een-a" sausages for vienna sausages, those little things that come in a can. And "pee-can" for pecan. Those pronunciations makes me happy.


Many people here pronounce it Vy-ee-nee.
 
2012-12-22 06:34:16 AM  
Surprised "succinct" was not on there, because I think I've heard this pronounced correctly maybe once or twice ever. People usually say "suh-sinked" instead of "suck-sinked".

Enjoyed finding I've been pronouncing "forte" and "grimace" incorrectly (sort of).
 
2012-12-22 06:34:16 AM  

100 Watt Walrus: omeganuepsilon: 100 Watt Walrus: Full disclosure: I do know quite a few who do say "axe." (It's kinda inevitable living in Oakland.) Most of them are intelligent people, and it's just something leftover from their childhoods.

From my earlier link:

Metathesis is responsible for some common speech errors, such as children acquiring spaghetti as pasketti. The pronunciation /ˈæsk/ for ask, now considered standard, descends from a northern version of the verb that in most midland and southern texts through the 1500s was spelled with "x" or "cs", showing pronunciation as /ˈæks/. Chaucer, Caxton, and the Coverdale Bible use "ax"; Shakespeare and the King James Bible have "ask"

I did not know that. That's fascinating!


That's what I thought, but didn't want to add it onto an already rambling post.

It appears as if it's the human brain at work, most of us simply do what we learn, but you get an outlier that metathesizes(Yeah, I just totally made up a word) something and it catches on and spreads, and it goes back and forth with specific sounds( axe ask). IE those specific sounds are more easily metathesized, but in both directions.
 
2012-12-22 06:37:27 AM  

omeganuepsilon: Hand Banana: I've seen quite a few people saying and writing it as prolly and it drives me crazy.

I say "howdy", "yall", "yonder" "prolly", almost as a joke, because language is fun to play with and it never hurts to be ridiculus on occasion. It's when people only speak that way and are incapable of sounding intelligent, that's when it's gotten ridiculous.


What's wrong with yonder? Perfectly good, correctly pronounced word.
 
2012-12-22 06:38:31 AM  
Even though it's correct I don't think I could pronounce forte as fort and I don't know anyone who does. It just sounds weird and hardly anyone would know what you were talking about. I think this is one of those cases where we need to accept that the accepted pronunciation has changed.
 
2012-12-22 06:40:31 AM  
That is a song I have not been able to escape on the internet for at least 12 years now.
 
2012-12-22 06:40:54 AM  
I personally like native-Hindi speakers' pronunciation of the title of those who create software - "devil-uppers" with the accent on "up." Rather fitting I think.
 
2012-12-22 06:43:51 AM  
I'm in nuclear power and I say nukeyoular. It seems regional honestly. Accents and whatnot.
Of course sometimes I accidently say "Missourruh" to the endless amusement of coworkers..
 
2012-12-22 06:50:27 AM  

ChildOfBhaal: omeganuepsilon: Hand Banana: I've seen quite a few people saying and writing it as prolly and it drives me crazy.

I say "howdy", "yall", "yonder" "prolly", almost as a joke, because language is fun to play with and it never hurts to be ridiculus on occasion. It's when people only speak that way and are incapable of sounding intelligent, that's when it's gotten ridiculous.

What's wrong with yonder? Perfectly good, correctly pronounced word.


Good, not so much.

Yes, it's a valid word, as many are, that people still would rather not use or have said to them. It's got that redneck hillbilly stigma. It's not just the accent, it's the sound of the word. A vast amount of people that say it sound like they don't like to read berks, not even gersberms

i0.kym-cdn.com
 
2012-12-22 06:50:51 AM  
Western Pennsylvania home of :

Wash = Warsh
Dahn Tahn = Downtown
Gint = Giant

Pittsburghese is a plague on the English language.
 
2012-12-22 06:51:20 AM  
Stoopid peeple:

click
aluminum
congradulations


Normal people:

clique
aluminium
congratulations
 
2012-12-22 06:54:05 AM  
assessory (doesn't bother me)
criteria as the singular (pet peeve)
 
2012-12-22 07:00:57 AM  

Teela: Realtor - reel a tor


It's pronounced "asshole psychopath lying scum shiatbag".
 
2012-12-22 07:04:13 AM  

Ringshadow: I'm in nuclear power and I say nukeyoular. It seems regional honestly. Accents and whatnot.
Of course sometimes I accidently say "Missourruh" to the endless amusement of coworkers..


I've got a nephew in-law who will flip out if you pronounce "Oregon" the way it's spelled instead of "Orgin" (similar to people turning pen into pin)
He's not even from there, he's from Nevada.

Bush aside, who deserves being ripped on for every little thing, I don't mind nuculear as a pronunciation. As I talked about above, it is regional to a point, but there is a logic behind it catching on as such.

nuclear → nucular /ˈnjuːkjələr/ (re-analysed as nuke + -cular suffix in particular, binocular)

also
Molecular. Vernacular, Macular, etc.

A lot of people don't get that there's a reason these things make sense and spread, and they simply chalk it up to simple ignorance. Almost ironic, that.
 
2012-12-22 07:05:35 AM  

omeganuepsilon: It's got that redneck hillbilly stigma.


Now that depends on whether it's used as an adverb or an adjective..

That there donkey over yonder... = Hillbilly

My lady in yonder meadow = British homosexual (NTTAWWT)

Alassra: Pittsburghese is a plague on the English language.


Do people there also "outen the lights"? Or drop "to be", as in "the dishes need warshed"?
 
2012-12-22 07:06:15 AM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Teela: Realtor - reel a tor

It's pronounced "asshole psychopath lying scum shiatbag".


That's "asshole SOCIOpath lying scum shiatbag".

Regional pronunciations being what they are.
 
2012-12-22 07:07:11 AM  
My favorite British pronunciation is urinal:

http://howjsay.com/index.php?word=urinal&submit=Submit
 
2012-12-22 07:07:33 AM  
Drawer.

As in 'drawer me a picture'

But enough of all this. What's with the superfluous 'u'? Flavour, colour, blouwjob, etc.

Typing takes long enough already without adding unnecessary letters.
 
2012-12-22 07:08:50 AM  
fark you subby, I had that song stuck in my head for WEEKS after UBL was killed...
 
2012-12-22 07:10:20 AM  
Neither my mother, my daughter nor my step daughter can pronounce 'specific'. I did have some fun with them one night a couple of years ago videoing them attempting not to say 'Pacific', but it descended into a chaos of giggles and laughter and a night well spent!
There's another word that none of them get right and I can't remember what that is right now, but it's got the same level of hilarity attached to it.

/read the family dictionary a lot when I was little
//Scrabble... one of my favourite games.
 
2012-12-22 07:11:03 AM  
Personal pet peeve this time of year; singers who say "Sanna" for Santa Claus.
Just curious; how many people say the "h" in herb?
 
2012-12-22 07:11:07 AM  
I am always amazed at the number of words I mispronounce. I think it's because most of my vocabulary comes from reading rather than hearing. howjsay scares me.
 
2012-12-22 07:18:52 AM  

Z-clipped: Medical, Matter, Mason.
Merry, marry, Mary. How hard is that?


You pronounce the name "Mary" with a hard "a"?
 
2012-12-22 07:20:35 AM  
Getting an ear worm from a headline.
Damn you subby, damn you!
 
2012-12-22 07:21:01 AM  

20/20: Just curious; how many people say the "h" in herb?


This guy?
www.gutsandglorytennis.com
 
2012-12-22 07:21:41 AM  
Idea pronounced as "eye-deer". Seems to be a snobbish thing.
 
2012-12-22 07:24:59 AM  
 
2012-12-22 07:25:27 AM  
+1 subby
 
2012-12-22 07:25:43 AM  

GungFu: Stoopid peeple:

click
aluminum
congradulations


Normal people:

clique
aluminium
congratulations


If not "click," then how is clique pronounced?

/judging by your second example, you're a Brit.
//anyone who could speak English left those isles long ago.
 
2012-12-22 07:26:52 AM  

20/20: Personal pet peeve this time of year; singers who say "Sanna" for Santa Claus.
Just curious; how many people say the "h" in herb?


Forget the "h." How any people say the "7" in herb?
 
2012-12-22 07:27:00 AM  

Dayglo Brown: Warsh.


"D'y'unt me to urn yer cloze after I warsh em foryeh?"

/dear sweet Grammy
 
2012-12-22 07:27:21 AM  

o'really: My southern (california) fam sez "vy-een-a" sausages for vienna sausages


Vy-een-a has a built in Australian accent to it
 
2012-12-22 07:31:02 AM  

Lorelle: For Americans, the 10 words are:

Mischievous
Jewelry
Library
February
Kindergarten
Ask
Sherbet
Probably
Nuclear
Pronunciation


Came for the absolutely stereotypical, stupid but oh so funny "axe" reference, leaving satisfied

/forgot aunt
//it's like any
///silly buggers
 
2012-12-22 07:32:13 AM  

Z-clipped: omeganuepsilon: It's got that redneck hillbilly stigma.

Now that depends on whether it's used as an adverb or an adjective..

That there donkey over yonder... = Hillbilly

My lady in yonder meadow = British homosexual (NTTAWWT)

Alassra: Pittsburghese is a plague on the English language.

Do people there also "outen the lights"? Or drop "to be", as in "the dishes need warshed"?


=============================

No... but they redd up the house when the want to clean it and eat "chipped chopped ham" as a gourmet sandwich.
 
2012-12-22 07:34:38 AM  
Asshole is a word I have a problem pronouncing. It usually comes out sounding like "brother-in-law".
 
2012-12-22 07:36:31 AM  
"Salmon", pronounced "SAL-MON" drives me nuts! I have a friend who says "aggavated" instead of "aggRavated." Ugh.
 
2012-12-22 07:36:34 AM  

20/20: Personal pet peeve this time of year; singers who say "Sanna" for Santa Claus.
Just curious; how many people say the "h" in herb?


In New Zealand we pronounce the "h". They might drop it in some British accents - for a relatively small area they have a lot of different accents, but I can't recall hearing any English or Scottish accent where it's dropped.

It's kind of viewed as an American shibboleth. If I hear someone say 'erbs, I know they're from the US.
 
2012-12-22 07:38:00 AM  

skinink: Asshole is a word I have a problem pronouncing. It usually comes out sounding like "brother-in-law".


Ha.
HAHA!

/too true
 
2012-12-22 07:40:40 AM  

HotWingAgenda: My biggest pet peeve is chipotle, though. It's the name of a major chain restaurant, for crying out loud. The L comes AFTER the T.


a thousand times
 
2012-12-22 07:41:11 AM  

HillshirefarmsGOMEAT: "Salmon", pronounced "SAL-MON" drives me nuts! I have a friend who says "aggavated" instead of "aggRavated." Ugh.


That crap gets me.

My mom says "dis Play" for display.
 
2012-12-22 07:42:37 AM  

Salt Lick Steady: Z-clipped: Medical, Matter, Mason.
Merry, marry, Mary. How hard is that?

You pronounce the name "Mary" with a hard "a"?


Well, technically "mason" is /e/, and "Mary" can be /e/ or /eɪ/. Either way, "Mary" is more moderated than "mason" because of the intervocalic /r/. There were better examples than "mason" but that was the first /m/ word that popped into my head. "Mare" would have worked, but "marigold" runs into the same regional merger. Still, it's close-mid to near-close, as opposed to open-mid or near-open.
 
2012-12-22 07:42:40 AM  

20/20: Personal pet peeve this time of year; singers who say "Sanna" for Santa Claus.


Doesn't bother me. A lot of people in the US (including me) pronounce "winter" as "winner," "counter" as "counner," etc.

BTW, "Santa Claus" comes from the Dutch "Sinterklaas," a word that was itself originally a "kiddie" mispronunciation of "Sint Nikolaas." (Saint Nicholas).

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-12-22 07:42:45 AM  
People who say conversate instead of converse make me want to smash my head through a wall.
 
2012-12-22 07:43:58 AM  
I was always under the impression that it was them (the Brits) who ridiculed us for murdering the Queen's english? Anyone who any trouble with those ten simple words has no business acting superior. That said, misspelling, poor grammar, and mispronunciation are all inexcusable. If ya can't talk or write correctly - shaddup!!
 
2012-12-22 07:44:05 AM  

HillshirefarmsGOMEAT: "Salmon", pronounced "SAL-MON" drives me nuts! I have a friend who says "aggavated" instead of "aggRavated." Ugh.


What about "ah-monds?"
 
2012-12-22 07:50:19 AM  
"Chesterdrawers". I keep my unnerwear in the Chesterdrawers.

The worst:

STUUU - DENT. (heard ten thousand times on television this last week)

Second:

WUUU-DENT (sometimes "WOO-UNT")

Close second:

COOO-DENT
(sometines COOO-ENT)

Mericans act more smarter, but we verbilate like monkeys.

Most seem to think a contraction is something you sign to buy a car.

Nancy Grace is about the most cringeworthy of the bunch.
 
2012-12-22 07:52:33 AM  
"Vulnerable" is not "vunnerable"
 
2012-12-22 07:52:47 AM  

Trixie212: People who say conversate instead of converse make me want to smash my head through a wall.


Next time, try it with their heads and see if they learn faster.
 
2012-12-22 07:53:54 AM  

tirob:
Doesn't bother me. A lot of people in the US (including me) pronounce "winter" as "winner," "counter" as "counner," etc.


Oh, and THAT bothers the hell outta me, too.

Stoopid monkeys
 
2012-12-22 07:55:15 AM  

thisispete: It's kind of viewed as an American shibboleth. If I hear someone say 'erbs, I know they're from the US.


But we spell through, T-H-R-U, and you spell it "thruff"!

userserve-ak.last.fm

Alassra: "chipped chopped ham"


LOL

KellyKellyKelly: Fark you for the long forgotton ear worm, subby.

That's funny, because even though I now know it isn't a Cheers reference (thanks to yesterday's explain-your-Fark-name thread), your handle always earworms me.

/your smile is so lovely, your hair is so clean
 
2012-12-22 07:55:21 AM  
"Its levi-O-sa not levi-o-SA!"
H. Granger

also the word for my parents and I is "breffes"t for breakfast.
 
2012-12-22 07:56:45 AM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Trixie212: People who say conversate instead of converse make me want to smash my head through a wall.

Next time, try it with their heads and see if they learn faster.


There is a DJ here in Memphis who makes that mistake every morning. I want to call in and scream at him everytime he does it.
 
2012-12-22 07:59:31 AM  
Let us nor forget POT-POUREE!

(as long as I am menandering down this lane)
 
2012-12-22 08:02:06 AM  

Mock26: Let us not judge those who cannot pronounce words. Let us instead pass judgement on those who cannot spell!

:-D


Fark 'em both!
Anyone who substitutes "axe" for ask - is ultra gay!
 
2012-12-22 08:02:40 AM  

omeganuepsilon: ChildOfBhaal: omeganuepsilon: Hand Banana: I've seen quite a few people saying and writing it as prolly and it drives me crazy.

I say "howdy", "yall", "yonder" "prolly", almost as a joke, because language is fun to play with and it never hurts to be ridiculus on occasion. It's when people only speak that way and are incapable of sounding intelligent, that's when it's gotten ridiculous.

What's wrong with yonder? Perfectly good, correctly pronounced word.

Good, not so much.

Yes, it's a valid word, as many are, that people still would rather not use or have said to them. It's got that redneck hillbilly stigma. It's not just the accent, it's the sound of the word. A vast amount of people that say it sound like they don't like to read berks, not even gersberms

[i0.kym-cdn.com image 402x604]



What light through yonder window breaks?

/missed the hillbilly memo
 
2012-12-22 08:03:30 AM  
I lived in Atlanta for 15 years, I'm pretty sure I can count on one hand the amount of people that live there that actually say "AtlanTa" instead of "Atlanna". Or HunTer and Hunner" for that matter.
 
2012-12-22 08:10:55 AM  
Stop saying "an historical". I'm sure you think you sound more intelligent, but you sound like you don't know h isn't a vowel.
 
2012-12-22 08:22:13 AM  

kellythecat: What light through yonder window breaks?

/missed the hillbilly memo


Missed it by a long time. You do know you're trying to give old english some relevancy post year 2000 right?

As a modern used common usage, it's ALL hillbilly.
 
2012-12-22 08:25:03 AM  

thisispete: There are words you read, which you know the meaning of, but you have no idea of the pronunciation. I was slightly disappointed when I saw an art documentary and found Titian is pronounced "Ti-shan" and not "Titty-an". " Paradigm" troubled me for a while, too, until I heard it in a lecture.


what? everyone knows it's par- a- di- gem
 
2012-12-22 08:25:15 AM  
I'm afraid I am not well ORIENTATED in the ways of proppa englush
 
2012-12-22 08:27:32 AM  
Not one mention of 'comfterble' yet?
 
2012-12-22 08:27:35 AM  
Curse you for the earworm, Subby. /shakes fist

I had an ex who used to mispronounce a couple things that irritated the bejeezus out of me. Like 'pseudo' as suede(like the fabric)-oh. Especially funny on a couple of occasions when he was biatching about somebody smarter than him being a "pretentious pseudo-intellectual jerk."

One I've noticed from a lot of older folks from up north is 'draw' instead of 'drawer'. "Go get me the scissors from the kitchen draw."
 
2012-12-22 08:29:14 AM  
My exhusband used to mispronounce and misuse phrases all the time. Drove me insane - hence the "ex" The most annoying phrase of his...... "I'll make it worth your wild"............. *head assplodes*
 
2012-12-22 08:30:44 AM  
So if I wrote a paper called "specific statistics on the development processes of the phenmoenon of conjugal remuneration," a ton of people in the UK wouldn't be able to talk about it because they would be hesitant to attempt to pronounce the title?
 
2012-12-22 08:30:52 AM  
How do you pronounce that pancreatic disease again?

i0.kym-cdn.com
 
2012-12-22 08:32:44 AM  
shiat. I should have proofread that. Oh well.
 
2012-12-22 08:33:02 AM  
Psaltery

Aluminum
 
2012-12-22 08:36:50 AM  

Tali: Curse you for the earworm, Subby. /shakes fist

I had an ex who used to mispronounce a couple things that irritated the bejeezus out of me. Like 'pseudo' as suede(like the fabric)-oh. Especially funny on a couple of occasions when he was biatching about somebody smarter than him being a "pretentious pseudo-intellectual jerk."

One I've noticed from a lot of older folks from up north is 'draw' instead of 'drawer'. "Go get me the scissors from the kitchen draw."


Dropping or modifying the the "er" is quite common, Brotha. Even the Brits do it a lot.

When I was in the service I got tired of saying Sergeant all of the time. Wheedled it down to Sa'an(t) [ie half T like I mentioned up thread.] fort the fun of it. No one ever batted an eye.

Verbal language is a lot like written word, you can subtract quite a bit and still be completely understandable.
 
2012-12-22 08:37:13 AM  
My ex-supervisor at work would be talking about budgetary concerns and would say something about needing to be careful with what we spend since the end of the "physical" year was June 30. Lolsigh.
 
2012-12-22 08:38:13 AM  
Volumptious.
 
2012-12-22 08:38:27 AM  
HOTL subby +>9000
 
2012-12-22 08:40:59 AM  

Aluminum Falcon: My ex-supervisor at work would be talking about budgetary concerns and would say something about needing to be careful with what we spend since the end of the "physical" year was June 30. Lolsigh.


Wouldn't that be "sense"? (if not "because"....these are terms dealing with logic, "since" is a term of passing time)

lolsigh indeed.
 
2012-12-22 08:41:57 AM  
Woshster -- Washserter -- Worseter -- Woostursher -- Steak sauce.
 
2012-12-22 08:42:39 AM  

omeganuepsilon: kellythecat: What light through yonder window breaks?

/missed the hillbilly memo

Missed it by a long time. You do know you're trying to give old english some relevancy post year 2000 right?

As a modern used common usage, it's ALL hillbilly.


You do know that Old English lasted only until roughly the 13th Century, right? Shakespeare was Early Modern English.

Also, Merry Christmas:
"Hither, page, and stand by me
If thou know'st it, telling
Yonder peasant, who is he?
Where and what his dwelling?"
 
2012-12-22 08:46:49 AM  
Try getting a japanese person to pronounce "auxiliary". My japanese teacher once made fun of a classmate of mine, because of his pronunciation of an "ahzirialy" verb. We made him repeat it three times before he gave up and said "No japanese person can pronounce that word."
 
2012-12-22 08:47:07 AM  
I can never pronounce "ask" it always comes out "axed".
 
2012-12-22 08:48:12 AM  
Gloucester
Worcestershire
 
2012-12-22 08:55:02 AM  
When listening to football commentators:

He is super AKKURUHTT

I also heard a DOCTOR on the radio the other day say "Irregardless"

/Ack-yur-uht
 
2012-12-22 08:56:40 AM  
Is it pronounced supposably or supposively?
 
2012-12-22 09:02:43 AM  
Orient and orientate have different meanings. Disoriented would surely mean to be removed from the Orient. Disorientated is to have lost ones bearings
 
2012-12-22 09:07:18 AM  

Ringshadow: I'm in nuclear power and I say nukeyoular. It seems regional honestly. Accents and whatnot.
Of course sometimes I accidently say "Missourruh" to the endless amusement of coworkers..


Are you the janitor?

I don't want you operating the rods if you say Nookuler!
 
2012-12-22 09:08:54 AM  
Came here to say "peculiarly," and failed miserably :(
 
2012-12-22 09:15:10 AM  

stu1-1: Lorelle: For Americans, the 10 words are:

Mischievous - Miss chee vee us
Jewelry - Jool ree
Library - lie berry
February - Feb you airy
Kindergarten - Kinder garden
Ask - Axe (seems to be a racial thing, not American)
Sherbet - Sure burt (is also considered correct)
Probably - Prob lee
Nuclear - Nuke you lur
Pronunciation - Pro noun see a shun


Have also heard "Jew-la-ree"
 
2012-12-22 09:18:29 AM  
Temperature - pronounced temp-a-cher.

Even the weather guys on the news screw this one up.
 
2012-12-22 09:19:20 AM  
What gets me all stabby is people who insist on using 'I' when they should use 'me'.
 
2012-12-22 09:25:44 AM  
Michigan accents kill me.   "Let's stahp by SevenuhLeven and gedduh pahp."
 
2012-12-22 09:31:43 AM  

Alassra: Western Pennsylvania home of :

Wash = Warsh
Dahn Tahn = Downtown
Gint = Giant

Pittsburghese is a plague on the English language.


What do you expect from people who can't even pronounce the name of their city correctly? Pittsburgh has 3 other pronunciations that I hear. Picks-burgh, Picks-bird, and Piss-burgh.
 
2012-12-22 09:36:55 AM  
Even living in Texas, I largely lack the accent according to friends and family. About all I say that could count is "y'all"
 
2012-12-22 09:42:56 AM  

Lee Jackson Beauregard: thisispete: Oh, and it's La-bor-a-tory, not Lab-ra-tree

It's a LABORatory, not a labORATORY.


Only if you're Boris Karloff.
 
2012-12-22 09:43:11 AM  
"thesaurus" pronounced "fee-a-saurus". Makes it sound like a dinosaur.

/ I don't say the leading h in herb, but only because I don't say the leading h in any word
// Or a trailing g.
/// I may not be elpin
 
2012-12-22 09:45:26 AM  

Marmilman: pedobearapproved: Marmilman: how the fark did "York" ever have three syllables? I can't imagine how it must have been pronounced.

"I-am-Sofa-King Wee-Todd-Did"

I don't get it. That sounds like "I am so farking retarded." I'm looking for the three syllable version of "York."


I bet it might have something to do with the original Latin name for the city "Eboracum". Maybe they originally were calling it E-yor-ik? (said quickly)

/I have no idea, just a guess.
 
2012-12-22 09:46:26 AM  
Hey! Americans!

It's "soar-ee" not "sari"

Sari is an Indian garment.

/sorry
 
2012-12-22 09:49:06 AM  

Stavr0: Woshster -- Washserter -- Worseter -- Woostursher -- Steak sauce.


this.jpg

Worchesshirshirshir...something...
 
2012-12-22 09:49:24 AM  

LDM90: Stop saying "an historical". I'm sure you think you sound more intelligent, but you sound like you don't know h isn't a vowel.


Economist style guide
 
2012-12-22 09:51:21 AM  
For some reason both my step-father and father in law pronounce batteries as bat-trees. Drives me nuts!
 
2012-12-22 09:53:02 AM  

Swiss Colony: Orient and orientate have different meanings. Disoriented would surely mean to be removed from the Orient. Disorientated is to have lost ones bearings


"Orientate" is an improper word formation, and its use should be discouraged.

The problem stems from the ability in English to convert verbs into nouns and vice-versa. The proper verb-form is "orient", and its corresponding noun-form is "orientation". People sometimes take "orientation" and mistakenly assume that its verb-form is "orientate".
 
2012-12-22 09:54:17 AM  

A challenger appears: Marmilman: pedobearapproved: Marmilman: how the fark did "York" ever have three syllables? I can't imagine how it must have been pronounced.

"I-am-Sofa-King Wee-Todd-Did"

I don't get it. That sounds like "I am so farking retarded." I'm looking for the three syllable version of "York."

I bet it might have something to do with the original Latin name for the city "Eboracum". Maybe they originally were calling it E-yor-ik? (said quickly)

/I have no idea, just a guess.


Ah, I should have kept reading the comments, someone found it out. Interesting stuff.
 
2012-12-22 09:54:36 AM  

katerbug72: For some reason both my step-father and father in law pronounce batteries as bat-trees. Drives me nuts!


My dad does that as well, but he also says dressing gown (robe) and Chesterfield (couch).
 
2012-12-22 09:59:42 AM  

Mr_Ectomy: Hey! Americans!

It's "soar-ee" not "sari"

Sari is an Indian garment.

/sorry


Sore-y? Like Michael J. Fox? That drives me nuts.
 
2012-12-22 10:00:28 AM  
Athalete.
 
2012-12-22 10:01:24 AM  

LDM90: Mr_Ectomy: Hey! Americans!

It's "soar-ee" not "sari"

Sari is an Indian garment.

/sorry

Sore-y? Like Michael J. Fox? That drives me nuts.


Hey! It's our word!

/Canadian
 
2012-12-22 10:02:10 AM  

fusillade762: Phenomenon, remuneration and statistics have topped a list of the most commonly mispronounced English words.

Speakers also have a problem getting their tongue around ethnicity, hereditary and particularly

Really?  Must be a Brit thing, because I don't know anyone who has problems with those words.  Maybe "remuneration" (I switch the M and N when I say that in my head).  Though I do want to cockpunch people who say "orientate".


I do the same, simply because it makes sense from a root word standpoint.
 
2012-12-22 10:03:43 AM  

katerbug72: For some reason both my step-father and father in law pronounce batteries as bat-trees. Drives me nuts!


my grandpa says "tunda and light-nin" and "A-rab" :)

/french canadian
 
2012-12-22 10:05:28 AM  

omeganuepsilon: Aluminum Falcon: My ex-supervisor at work would be talking about budgetary concerns and would say something about needing to be careful with what we spend since the end of the "physical" year was June 30. Lolsigh.

Wouldn't that be "sense"? (if not "because"....these are terms dealing with logic, "since" is a term of passing time)

lolsigh indeed.


Dictionary, motherfarker. Get one.
 
2012-12-22 10:06:53 AM  
i45.tinypic.com

One of the best RiffTrax shorts.

/game, set, Blandford.
 
2012-12-22 10:07:03 AM  

tonguedepressor: I can never pronounce "ask" it always comes out "axed".


That paints a picture to be sure.
 
2012-12-22 10:09:43 AM  
I called Dun & Bradstreet to order an investigation on a company in Georgia that was not listed. They used (at that time) an offshore call center to handle the requests. The gentleman I spoke with repeatedly pronounced the state as if it were a derivative of "geography," and not of "George."
 
2012-12-22 10:11:44 AM  

omeganuepsilon: Yes, it's a valid word, as many are, that people still would rather not use or have said to them. It's got that redneck hillbilly stigma. It's not just the accent, it's the sound of the word. A vast amount of people that say it sound like they don't like to read berks, not even gersberms


I reckon they need to get over it.
 
2012-12-22 10:12:44 AM  
Link
Good stuff... Love the Muppets!
 
2012-12-22 10:13:41 AM  
Ah came here to git sumpin but now I caint member what.

nebbermind
 
2012-12-22 10:20:21 AM  

Swiss Colony: Orient and orientate have different meanings. Disoriented would surely mean to be removed from the Orient. Disorientated is to have lost ones bearings


They both mean the same thing. "Orient" is American and "orientate" is British and sounds stupid (and I say this as a colonist of British descent). I'm not "orientateering" when I'm using a compass to navigate. "Orient" as in "to find your bearings" comes from the the Middle Ages, when maps were oriented with east at the top. Churches were also oriented with the altar to the east/rising sun. To say something is "easted" when pointed to the east makes more sense to me than "eastatated", which sounds like a verbal avalanche of derp.

Or imagine "occident" (west) as a verb. "Occidentated". Gah!
 
2012-12-22 10:25:15 AM  
Obama?
 
2012-12-22 10:27:04 AM  

traylor: Obama?


Barerack Obammar? (British)
 
2012-12-22 10:27:11 AM  

Mock26: Let us not judge those who cannot pronounce words. Let us instead pass judgement on those who cannot spell!

:-D


I'm not sure 1) what you're saying here, and 2) if you're serious. "Phenomenon" is pronounced with the terminal "n" voiced. It sounds like it is spelled. "Phenomena" is the plural of the word "phenomenon," and also sounds like it is spelled, assuming you dig the whole "ph" = "f" thing.
 
2012-12-22 10:28:31 AM  

Gleeman: Stavr0: Woshster -- Washserter -- Worseter -- Woostursher -- Steak sauce.

this.jpg

Worchesshirshirshir...something...


A1?
 
2012-12-22 10:29:32 AM  

bborchar: Try getting a japanese person to pronounce "auxiliary". My japanese teacher once made fun of a classmate of mine, because of his pronunciation of an "ahzirialy" verb. We made him repeat it three times before he gave up and said "No japanese person can pronounce that word."


One of the advantages of working for a Japanese owned company is that my mis-pronunciations of words go completely unnoticed.

/and most japanese wouldn't have a problem pronouncing 'auxiliary'.
 
2012-12-22 10:35:57 AM  
i have a very intelligent, well educated friend who has trouble with two words:

wolf = woof
philadelphia = philadelthia

/he does not hear it
//???
 
2012-12-22 10:42:18 AM  

Marmilman: how the fark did "York" ever have three syllables? I can't imagine how it must have been pronounced.


The funny thing is that it was originally FOUR syllables.
 
2012-12-22 10:44:35 AM  
Everyone besides me pronounces "sour" wrong, unless it does in fact have a "w" in it.
 
2012-12-22 10:46:55 AM  

Swiss Colony: What gets me all stabby is people who insist on using 'I' when they should use 'me'.


Over-correction. Parents and teachers chide children who misuse "me" so much that people grow up afraid to use it, even in cases where it would be correct.

I can't even think of the last time I heard "myself" used correctly.

Correct: I pleasured myself this morning.

Incorrect: Your mom blew the pool boy and myself this morning.
 
2012-12-22 10:49:27 AM  

strapp3r: i have a very intelligent, well educated friend who has trouble with two words:

wolf = woof
philadelphia = philadelthia

/he does not hear it
//???


As for wolf, some people just seem to have trouble with those Ls. Take the word public, for example. Ira Glass says "pubbic" and Tom Brokaw would say something like "pubuic".

I happen to think people who have speech impediments should probably not be in broadcasting, but that's another matter.
 
2012-12-22 10:51:02 AM  

thisispete: 20/20: Personal pet peeve this time of year; singers who say "Sanna" for Santa Claus.
Just curious; how many people say the "h" in herb?

In New Zealand we pronounce the "h". They might drop it in some British accents - for a relatively small area they have a lot of different accents, but I can't recall hearing any English or Scottish accent where it's dropped.

It's kind of viewed as an American shibboleth. If I hear someone say 'erbs, I know they're from the US.


My family is from Newfoundland - among all the other words we say funny, the 'h' always gets dropped off the beginning of words - "I'm goin' 'ome to me 'ouse for the 'erbs". My grandfather had a really heavy accent, and used to drive me bonkers by changing my name from 'Diana' to 'Doy-anner'.
Lard Jeezus.
 
2012-12-22 10:53:01 AM  
redheadedslut: "my grandpa says "tunda and light-nin" and "A-rab" :)

/french canadian"

My ex's family in detroit say eh-rab too, which sounds like an insult to me (and they probly mean it as one). But that's not far from french canadia, rite?
 
2012-12-22 10:53:50 AM  

Thunderboy: stu1-1: Thunderboy: I run into the mispronunciation of "phenomenon" (pronounced "phenomena") a lot - most recently by a Harvard graduate.

phenomenon = singular
phenomena = plural

Dayglo Brown:

"Phenomena" is the plural form of "phenomenon".

Yes. And that's why pronouncing "phenomenon" as "phenomena" is incorrect. Gold stars for both of you!


They used the wrong word not mispronounced the right word.

It's like saying somebody mispronounced the word "car" by saying "truck."
 
2012-12-22 10:59:03 AM  
I seem to have issues with epitome. I pronounce it epa-tome (like a book).

My ex couldn't say inevitable correctly. He said "in-a-vie-tubble"

hubby is british and uses V in place of th in words like mother and brother, but can say the th fine for father or rather
/i think everybody has at least one or two words that give them trouble.
 
2012-12-22 10:59:15 AM  

CujoQuarrel: Fronk-n-steen


Frood-rick?
 
2012-12-22 11:01:03 AM  
My neighbor asked to borrow my furniture dollies last night to help move something. Of course since he has had people point out a problem with his pronunciation he felt he needed to rephrase it a few times to make sure he was understood.

"Hey man, can I borrow your dollies, I've got to move a wallboard over some nihnoleum. You know, I don't want to scratch the nihnoleum. Because the kitchen has aninoleum floors. Even though we're going to remove the nihnoleum soon, we don't want to have scratches in the nihnoleum until we can get some new nihnoleum."
 
2012-12-22 11:01:24 AM  

Another Government Employee: tonguedepressor: I can never pronounce "ask" it always comes out "axed".

That paints a picture to be sure.


Yes, a dark one indeed.
 
2012-12-22 11:03:41 AM  

Marmilman: how the fark did "York" ever have three syllables? I can't imagine how it must have been pronounced.


"Yoh-or-kuh"

Or something similiar, I'm guessing. Like how some folks pronounce "fire" as "fahr", when it should be "fi-er", I bet early english had a different rule for that middle 'O' sound in York.
 
2012-12-22 11:06:04 AM  
Headline of the year. Most definitely (even though there's only a handful of days yet)
 
2012-12-22 11:06:34 AM  

Forbidden Doughnut: thisispete: Oh, and it's La-bor-a-tory, not Lab-ra-tree

I (mis)pronounce that as "Lab-ra-tory"...


Me too...
 
2012-12-22 11:06:39 AM  
None of you can pronounce Pasteurized properly, so there. I've run rings round you logically.
 
2012-12-22 11:10:23 AM  

Teela: Realtor - reel a tor
Supposedly - supposably


SO MUCH THIS

total peev...

remember - member
 
2012-12-22 11:10:37 AM  
If your from Pittsburg there are a ton of words that are pronounced wrong. If someone asks "Jeet yet?" the answer is "No, Jew?"
/I probly can't go, I have to red up my house.
 
2012-12-22 11:11:14 AM  

buckler: weiner dog: pedobearapproved: people that say "fusstrating" for "frustrating" make me want to shoot an endangered creature in the middle of it mating....right before the little critter climaxes.

My Mom says that. Fusstrates. It sucks because it makes her seem less intelligent than she really is; she's a smart and incredibly creative person. I think mispronunciations like these could be a holdover from childhood; I doubt she was corrected on it. Some parents think things like that are "cute". My ex-boyfriend's Mom didn't seek out therapy after my ex developed a lisp due to smacking his mouth when he was a toddler. Developmental complications from injuries are just adorable!

I had a kid whose speech was all kind of farked up at six, because his mom thought his mispronunciations were 'cute'. He made some really bizarre sound substitutions. When he asked for a drink, he'd say "I bant a sink of bawter." It took him years to overcome it.


My daugheter had issues with words beginning with vowel sounds when she was a toddler. She would borrow a consonant from the middle of the word to stick at the start, thus elbow became belbow, ernie was nernie and so on. She also had a hint of elmer fuddism going on then, but luckily grew out of both, despite being tongue-tied. (she can't stick her tongue out hardly at all even now. Something to do with the ligament)
 
2012-12-22 11:13:18 AM  

othmar: you know if i had a big box of crayons and some poster board, i could make the perfect graph and then recreate it on etch a sketch to prove my point.

but that is way to much work for me to do right now.


mspaint?
 
2012-12-22 11:13:29 AM  

Mouser: Swiss Colony: Orient and orientate have different meanings. Disoriented would surely mean to be removed from the Orient. Disorientated is to have lost ones bearings

"Orientate" is an improper word formation, and its use should be discouraged.

The problem stems from the ability in English to convert verbs into nouns and vice-versa. The proper verb-form is "orient", and its corresponding noun-form is "orientation". People sometimes take "orientation" and mistakenly assume that its verb-form is "orientate".


No, both uses acceptable according to OED, 150 year tradition of orientate, like many things this is a case of Americans and English being separated by a common language.
 
2012-12-22 11:13:30 AM  
I once suffered through a long joke about a "camoo", waiting for the punchline to explain what a camoo was. After polite laughter I had to whisper to my friend, who seemed to have picked up on the joke.

Me: "So, do you know what the camoo is suppose to be?"
Farker: "You don't know what a camel is?"
Me: "Oh! A camel. Ha! Why didn't he say camel?"
Farker: "He did. The whole joke was about a camel."
Me: "No. He didn't say camel, he said camoo. Didn't you hear him?"
Farker: "He was talking about a camel. What the hell is a camoo?"
Me: "That's what I'm saying. What the hell is a camoo?"
 
2012-12-22 11:14:24 AM  

oryx: Alassra: Western Pennsylvania home of :

Wash = Warsh
Dahn Tahn = Downtown
Gint = Giant

Pittsburghese is a plague on the English language.

What do you expect from people who can't even pronounce the name of their city correctly? Pittsburgh has 3 other pronunciations that I hear. Picks-burgh, Picks-bird, and Piss-burgh.


Ged aht! Yinz are all jag-offs.
 
2012-12-22 11:14:31 AM  

dopekitty74: buckler: weiner dog: pedobearapproved:

My daugheter


yes...of course it is....
 
2012-12-22 11:19:04 AM  
I used to have license plates with MNA-MNA, so I'm getting a kick, etc.

I have real trouble pronouncing anonymity. In my head, I hear it correctly, I know how to say it. When it comes out, though, its a garbled mess.
 
2012-12-22 11:19:05 AM  

calbert: for those who don't get it:

[images3.wikia.nocookie.net image 300x220]

Sandra Bullock

fyi, those creatures are called Snowths.

/pretty dumb headline, quite a stretch for lame pay-off.

:-/


Actually, it's more about the original.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gsjcb7w1Y-w
 
2012-12-22 11:23:30 AM  

LDM90: Stop saying "an historical". I'm sure you think you sound more intelligent, but you sound like you don't know h isn't a vowel.


http://wordinfo.info/unit/3431/ip:1

correct grammar law is that if the "h" is silent, use "an". if the "h" is sounded, such as in the word "hotel", use "a"...
 
2012-12-22 11:28:48 AM  

ruta: Swiss Colony: Orient and orientate have different meanings. Disoriented would surely mean to be removed from the Orient. Disorientated is to have lost ones bearings

They both mean the same thing. "Orient" is American and "orientate" is British and sounds stupid (and I say this as a colonist of British descent). I'm not "orientateering" when I'm using a compass to navigate. "Orient" as in "to find your bearings" comes from the the Middle Ages, when maps were oriented with east at the top. Churches were also oriented with the altar to the east/rising sun. To say something is "easted" when pointed to the east makes more sense to me than "eastatated", which sounds like a verbal avalanche of derp.

Or imagine "occident" (west) as a verb. "Occidentated". Gah!


I say oriented, but don't cringe at orientated. Even though seemingly all Americans accept "orientation" as an appropriate word, orientate is more viable. Technically, by your own words, saying oriented means specfically related to the east, and that's not how we use it.
 
2012-12-22 11:29:58 AM  

santadog: calbert: for those who don't get it:

[images3.wikia.nocookie.net image 300x220]

Sandra Bullock

fyi, those creatures are called Snowths.

/pretty dumb headline, quite a stretch for lame pay-off.

:-/

Actually, it's more about the original.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gsjcb7w1Y-w


yes. which was already linked to prior to my posting. my link was to their own evolution/inside joke about it. even if subby was aware or not.

and this headline has been done here many times before, so no points or dick sucking for subby.
but everybody goes apesh*t over the same repeated headlines over and over.
time stands still here.
 
2012-12-22 11:30:33 AM  

Avenger: Phenomenon reminds me a lot more of this (for good or for bad)

Funk Phenomenon


Link
 
2012-12-22 11:37:52 AM  

DeerNuts: Swiss Colony: What gets me all stabby is people who insist on using 'I' when they should use 'me'.

Over-correction. Parents and teachers chide children who misuse "me" so much that people grow up afraid to use it, even in cases where it would be correct.

I can't even think of the last time I heard "myself" used correctly.

Correct: I pleasured myself this morning.

Incorrect: Your mom blew the pool boy and myself this morning.


While I agree that this one is annoying it's not a pronunciation problem. Stick to the issue at hand people!

Chi-pol-tay is the scourge of our existence thanks to the chain restaurant expanding. I saw an episode of some food show on the Food Network one day where they interviewed a lady that kept saying "chi-pol-tay." I wanted to punch the TV so much...
 
2012-12-22 11:39:19 AM  
Phenomenon, remuneration and statistics

ethnicity, hereditary and particularly

conjugal, specific, processes and development


images.blahpers.com
Brits can't pronounce Greek and Latin correctly. Film at eleventy.

/I mean
//shiat
///forgive me
////American
 
2012-12-22 11:41:43 AM  

ElizaDoolittle: I am always amazed at the number of words I mispronounce. I think it's because most of my vocabulary comes from reading rather than hearing. howjsay scares me.


I have the same problem. Place names are hard too, especially when you get all those foreign influences. I had to write down what sounded like "Lake Ponderay" once. I'd never heard of it, even though it's not that far away, and as the person told me snippily, "It's the biggest lake in Idaho!"

It's spelled Lake Pend Oreille. Now who the fark would know how to spell that? (The person who was correcting me didn't know how to spell it either.)
 
2012-12-22 11:43:18 AM  
the two that drive me nuts, along with the usual suspect (the mangling of orient, and oriented) are

"ambleeance" for ambulance, and
"somewheres", for somewhere.
 
2012-12-22 11:54:11 AM  
 
2012-12-22 11:57:34 AM  

Trixie212: People who say conversate instead of converse make me want to smash my head through a wall.


Sounds like a Bushism to me... ( eg. misunderestimate )
 
2012-12-22 12:02:44 PM  

omeganuepsilon: o'really: I cannot for the life of me say "arnold palmer". I sound like the governator when I attempt it.

I can say arnold. Palmer has a trick, you start the "L" sound and give up half way through. You do it slow it sounds like W, but when you let it roll out it sounds right.

It like dropping a T partially off of a word. Damni(t). It's not quite a silent T, it's a half T. Not quite enunciated T like titty.
Comes from how we normalize a vowel sound after T. People who take speech class to do it "correctly" seemingly always end up enunciating a "whole" T, to include a "tuh" or "tah" sound at the end that makes them sound ridiculous.


My last name is Palmer. It's pronounced pall-mur, though i've heard some canadian hick types pronounce it par-mur.
 
2012-12-22 12:03:58 PM  
Gyro. It was always Jie-Row until some foreigners co-opted the word with their pretentiously sophisticated sandwich and insisted we change the word to Yeeee rdohhh with some cheesy accent to appease them. Order a freakin Jie-Row from them and watch their reaction!
 
2012-12-22 12:06:03 PM  
90% of this thread: "You don't pronounce ___ the way I was taught it so YOU ARE WRONG"
 
2012-12-22 12:12:17 PM  
all this mispronunciations stuff ...

it's somethin like a phenomenon ...

3.bp.blogspot.com

/what i got stuck in my head from the headline
//i dont mind ego trippin one bit
 
2012-12-22 12:15:58 PM  

Thunderboy: I run into the mispronunciation of "phenomenon" (pronounced "phenomena") a lot - most recently by a Harvard graduate.


eh? Phenomena is the plural, phenomenon the singular. I don't understand what you are saying ... that he misuses the plural?
 
2012-12-22 12:20:42 PM  

yourmomlovestetris: Lately I've heard people pronouncing the word "saccharine" with a "ch as in chair" sound. I've also heard people say the word "prevalent" as "pre-VAY-lent", not "PREH-va-lent". Have these alternate ways to pronounce these words always existed or are these just instances of clueless internet folks trying to use words they've only read and not heard before?

One of my personal word pet peeves are people who use the word "disorientated" instead of "disoriented". Why add the extra syllable? It seems like just a waste. It's irritating...


A quick google search tells me that disorientated is BRITISH english, whereas (I assume) disoriented is american. I wondered because I grew up hearing and seeing disorientated - and I am a Brit.
 
2012-12-22 12:31:13 PM  

redheadedslut: katerbug72: For some reason both my step-father and father in law pronounce batteries as bat-trees. Drives me nuts!

my grandpa says "tunda and light-nin" and "A-rab" :)

/french canadian


Omg, the french just can't say the th sound at all.

One, two, tree, four.
 
2012-12-22 12:43:26 PM  

ItchyBrother: tirob:
Doesn't bother me. A lot of people in the US (including me) pronounce "winter" as "winner," "counter" as "counner," etc.

Oh, and THAT bothers the hell outta me, too.

Stoopid monkeys


Around here, if you pronounce the t in "winter" too carefully, it sound like an affectation. We ain't no dumber here than anywhere else, I assure you.
 
2012-12-22 12:43:48 PM  
we have a nurse who is probably one of the best hospice nurses I know and I'd love to get into her pants so I don't say anything, but I stilll cringe every time she says

DEMEN TEE A instead of pronouncing it as DEMENTCHA

What really pisses me off is when YOU farkers spell out beyotch or BIATCH instead of just typing the farking word as it is meant to be spelled: BITSH

Get a brane yu morans
 
2012-12-22 12:46:13 PM  
Oh yeah and the word is HYDROCODONE, not Hydrocodeine..there is no farking hydrocodeine you farkeads
 
2012-12-22 12:52:12 PM  

Teela: Realtor - reel a tor
Supposedly - supposably


Or worse: supposively
 
2012-12-22 12:56:52 PM  
I took a very small seminar course in grad school about teaching at the college level (total waste of time). There was a woman there who not only used the word "antidote" instead of "anecdote", but she managed to find a way to work the incorrect usage into conversation every single week.
 
2012-12-22 12:59:32 PM  
archetype. i hear this one a lot. its such a clunky word.
 
2012-12-22 01:03:02 PM  
Which is glassier, the Glacier or the mirror? Huh? Come on brits!!
 
2012-12-22 01:25:27 PM  

Snapper Carr: The mispronunciation of "grimace" is so prevalent that most dictionaries list both the correct (long a and accent on the second syllable) and the common one (like the big purple thing in the McDonald's commercials)


At which point the "common one" is also "the correct one."

But I'll admit I'm slightly curious why you think there's something wrong with with the common pronunciation.  Is it more recent?  Usually Grammar Nazis have some sort of reasoning behind their hatred of a particular word or spelling or pronunciation, and in my experience it usually boils down to "This is better because it's older."
 
2012-12-22 01:34:09 PM  
The British are terrible at pronouncing words in English.
 
2012-12-22 01:35:22 PM  

LonMead: "I was going to make espresso!"


"This is not an espresso maker. This is, in fact, a damp cardboard box with the word "espresto" written on it. In crayon."
 
2012-12-22 01:47:18 PM  
Wistersistersistershire sauce.

Bascetti? (Spaghetti, usually a kids; thing)

My ex used to pronounce syrup "surp." Drove me crazy.

Also, sWords.

www.ledieci.net

Hey Brian, would you like some Cool Hwip? How about some Hweat Thins?"
 
2012-12-22 01:55:37 PM  
Try askng a Brit to say actually.

My college-educated PHB can't say supposedly (it always comes out as supposively), no matter how much crap I give him about it. He's so insistent upon making sure everyone knows he has a Master's degree, then can't pronounce common words properly. Perhaps it's a mid-west thing.

Slightly related note: I once got in an argument with a Navy Commander about the proper use of the apostrophe in "its". He insisted on applying the apostrophe to the possessive, and I told him he was wrong (my tendency to tell people of higher rank they were wrong probably contributed to my lack of promotion in the service, btw). It mattered, because I was in charge of the work center with the engraving machine for that particular ship, and my guys had delivered a commemorative brass placard to the Commander for some function or another. Commander Spellsbadly insisted we re-do the work because of the apostrophe, and I told him no.
(/csb)
 
2012-12-22 01:59:19 PM  
"Comfortable" is usually pronounced "comfterble."

/I can barely pronounce "particularly" without planning.
 
2012-12-22 02:01:57 PM  
"Warsh". My wife was born in Kodiak and has never been south of the Mason-Dixon line in her life. Yet she insists on pronouncing "Wash" as "Warsh".

No, I won't "Warsh" the car.
 
2012-12-22 02:04:17 PM  
This thread is amazing. I can't tell who's trolling, who doesn't know what a dialect is, and who's legitimately stupid. It's the most incredible Poe's Law battle royale I've ever seen on Fark.
 
2012-12-22 02:04:32 PM  

ciberido: But I'll admit I'm slightly curious why you think there's something wrong with with the common pronunciation


I'm slightly curious why you're making a big deal out of this. It's not like a go around yelling at people for mispronouncing the word. I'm just pointing out a commonly (almost universally really) mispronounced word in a thread of commonly mispronounced words.
 
2012-12-22 02:09:16 PM  

lumiere: A while back I had a conference call with a team in India and one of the guys pronounced "competitors", "com pet teet er". I had to jump fast and hit the mute button so he wouldn't hear me laugh.

/why this kolaveri di?


"rhythm correct, maintain please."

I don't know how many times I've heard Kolavari Di. Thanks. Now it's in my head.
 
2012-12-22 02:16:14 PM  

omeganuepsilon: Hand Banana: I've seen quite a few people saying and writing it as prolly and it drives me crazy.

I see a distinction there....

There are people who say it that way 24/7 and don't know better, and people who say it as a casual affectation.

I say "howdy", "yall", "yonder" "prolly", almost as a joke, because language is fun to play with and it never hurts to be ridiculus on occasion. It's when people only speak that way and are incapable of sounding intelligent, that's when it's gotten ridiculous.

If you're good you can even do it in a professional environment, as a means of displaying that you're not super serial all of the time, that you're personable and get on with people.

If you have a serious problem with it, don't move to the southern US.


This is my dream. I spent years in Japan working with Canadians, Brits, and Australians and developed a very neutral Mid-Atlantic accent, but I dream of someday getting good enough at something that I can let my real accent come back.

/ever seen Sergeant York?
//that's my whole family
///probably misusing slashies
 
2012-12-22 03:08:48 PM  
The thing that drives me nuts is dropping the -ly from adjectives at the end of a sentence.
 
2012-12-22 03:09:48 PM  

karl2025: If everyone pronounces it wrong, isn't it more true that the "correct" pronunciation is no longer correct?


Yes, unless you're a prescriptivist (a.k.a Grammar Nazi).  The irony is that Grammar Nazis are more often than not wrong about they very thing they complain so loudly of others being "wrong" about.  Split infinitives and ending sentences with prepositions are the most obvious examples.
 
2012-12-22 03:15:50 PM  
What? No theater? How about one that stings my ears in America, forward?

It's FOR - WARD, not foe-werd.
 
2012-12-22 03:19:11 PM  

100 Watt Walrus: Full disclosure, part 2: I mispronounce "orange juice" as "ornch juice." No idea why. It just happens. I don't mispronounce "orange" on its own.


For me, it's three words.

1. I often mispronounce "breakfast" as "brea'fast."  Unless I consciously make an effort, the "k" completely disappears.
2. Nuclear as "nuke-yoo-ler."  Again, I pronounce it correctly when I make an effort, but if I don't think about it I sound like Bush.
3. Chipotle.

In all cases I can pronounce the word correctly if I'm paying attention, but if I talk carelessly, I give the "uneducated-sounding" pronunciations.  So it's not ignorance, it's carelessness.

Also, on a somewhat related topic, having lived in countries where English wasn't the primary language, I've learned a kind of "neutral international English," which is as close to speaking without any accent as I can manage.  It has some other features, like minimal use of slang.  I've noticed that a lot of people develop some form of this "neutral English" if they live abroad long enough.  Even when speaking to another native speaker, you'll sometimes see this.  So you'll find an American talking to a Brit, for example, and the American has much less of an American accent than usual, and the Brit less of a British accent.  For the most part, it's not even a conscious thing; it just seems to happen.
 
2012-12-22 03:20:50 PM  

Lorelle: For Americans, the 10 words are:

Mischievous
Jewelry
Library
February
Kindergarten
Ask
Sherbet
Probably
Nuclear
Pronunciation


Well, if you listen to some Brits they'll say it and spell it as Jewellery. fark you, it's jewelry. There's no need at all for the extra syllable.
 
2012-12-22 03:21:18 PM  

Lorelle: For Americans, the 10 words are:

Mischievous
Jewelry
Library
February
Kindergarten
Ask
Sherbet
Probably
Nuclear
Pronunciation


What about Wal-Marts or Krogers?
 
2012-12-22 03:25:53 PM  

deadsanta: Like how some folks pronounce "fire" as "fahr", when it should be "fi-er"


Nope. Not two syllables. One syllable.

But it's a bit like iron. Everyone says it eye-ern.
 
2012-12-22 03:26:46 PM  

Z-clipped: Maybe it's because I grew up mostly in NYC, but for some reason it farking kills me when people from the west coast say "Beggle". And even though I know it's a large portion of the country that does this, I can't understand why people think that "Merry" "Marry" and "Mary" are homophones.

Medical, Matter, Mason.
Merry, marry, Mary. How hard is that?


Because they ARE homophones in the dialects many of us speak.   It's not a question of being "difficult" or of the people who speak a dialect being "ignorant."  You say you're interested in linguistics, but you're never going to even begin to understand linguistics until you let go of the conceit that the dialect of English you grew up with is the "purest" form.

It's no more rational of you to insist that people who pronounce "merry, marry, and Mary" the same way are wrong, ignorant, or lazy than it would be for me to lambaste you for mispronouncing the word "wound" (as in Injury) --- in Shakespeare's time it rhymed with "round," just like the past tense of "wind," and it's equally "wrong" of you to "mispronounce" it as "woond."
 
2012-12-22 03:28:49 PM  
exetera.
 
2012-12-22 03:32:01 PM  

tirob: Doesn't bother me. A lot of people in the US (including me) pronounce "winter" as "winner," "counter" as "counner," etc.


And batter rhymes with sadder, butter rhymes with rudder. It's a consonant shift and if spelling weren't standardized we'd spell them the way they're pronounced.

shiat, English still spells things the same as they were before the Vowel Shift so we say n-ai-f for knife (k-n-ee-f-eh) and n-ai-t for knight (k-n-ee-gh-t) where the gh is a sound like hocking a loogie.
 
2012-12-22 03:33:43 PM  

ChildOfBhaal: omeganuepsilon: Hand Banana: I've seen quite a few people saying and writing it as prolly and it drives me crazy.

I say "howdy", "yall", "yonder" "prolly", almost as a joke, because language is fun to play with and it never hurts to be ridiculus on occasion. It's when people only speak that way and are incapable of sounding intelligent, that's when it's gotten ridiculous.

What's wrong with yonder? Perfectly good, correctly pronounced word.


"Y'all" is second-person plural in American English .  I eschew it when dealing with non-Americans in the same way an Australian might avoid the word "ute" in an international setting.  If American English is your first language, then there is no excuse for you complaining about "y'all."  It's part of the language.  Deal with it.
 
2012-12-22 03:37:58 PM  
Y'all is a contraction and I think it's perfectly acceptable. I prefer it immensely to "you guys" or "yous" or "y'uns". These are all horrible.
 
2012-12-22 03:40:51 PM  

GungFu: Stoopid peeple:

click
aluminum
congradulations


Normal people:

clique
aluminium
congratulations


Considering that the man who came up with the name "aluminum" spelled it originally with only the single "I", I don't think it's the people who spell it "aluminum" who are stupid.

I will say again I find it amusing how often Grammar Nazis are wrong about the very things they insist are "stupid" or "ignorant."  It really is such a perfect combination of hypocrisy, ignorance, and smugness.
 
2012-12-22 03:43:44 PM  

Rose McGowan Loveslave: "Its levi-O-sa not levi-o-SA!"
H. Granger

also the word for my parents and I is "breffes"t for breakfast.


Ah, so I'm not the only one who drops the "k" from "breakfast."  I was rather wondering where I had picked up that bad habit.
 
2012-12-22 03:50:46 PM  

Anderson's Pooper: Temperature - pronounced temp-a-cher.

Even the weather guys on the news screw this one up.


Blame the  laundry detergent commercial for the 1980s.
 
2012-12-22 03:51:03 PM  

Benjimin_Dover:
They used the wrong word not mispronounced the right word.

It's like saying somebody mispronounced the word "car" by saying "truck."


StashMonster:

eh? Phenomena is the plural, phenomenon the singular. I don't understand what you are saying ... that he misuses the plural?


Clearly I need to provide more context!

I currently edit audio books for a living. The individual in question was narrating a book they wrote. Upon encountering the word "phenomenon", this individual pronounced it "phenomena". This isn't about using the wrong word or form of a word, it is about reading a word and not pronouncing it correctly. The word "phenomena" also appeared many times in the book, and was pronounced correctly.

This is a common issue with books read by the author. I don't recall ever running into this issue with books read by professional voice actors.
 
2012-12-22 03:53:28 PM  

Mr_Ectomy: Hey! Americans!

It's "soar-ee" not "sari"

Sari is an Indian garment.

/sorry


Hey, non-Americans!

We don't care how you think "sorry" should be pronounced.

/Not sorry.
 
2012-12-22 04:06:48 PM  

Thunderboy: Benjimin_Dover:
They used the wrong word not mispronounced the right word.

It's like saying somebody mispronounced the word "car" by saying "truck."

StashMonster:

eh? Phenomena is the plural, phenomenon the singular. I don't understand what you are saying ... that he misuses the plural?

Clearly I need to provide more context!

I currently edit audio books for a living. The individual in question was narrating a book they wrote. Upon encountering the word "phenomenon", this individual pronounced it "phenomena". This isn't about using the wrong word or form of a word, it is about reading a word and not pronouncing it correctly. The word "phenomena" also appeared many times in the book, and was pronounced correctly.

This is a common issue with books read by the author. I don't recall ever running into this issue with books read by professional voice actors.


It bugged me when I listened to the Dresden Files series read by James Marsters and he pronounced "chitinous" with a ch as in "cheese" rather than a ch as in "christ." I think the word appears twice in the whole series, which might be the only time I've ever seen it in fiction.
 
2012-12-22 04:13:06 PM  
Me: "Do you have a pen?"
Boston friend: "There's one in the drah."
"Where?"
"The drah."
"The what?"
"The drah. Right there. The drah"
*pointing "The drawer?"
"Yeah, the drah."
 
2012-12-22 04:26:37 PM  
Posting my Weeners ever, to say that this is the best headline ever.
 
2012-12-22 04:30:07 PM  
ciberido:
"I will say again I find it amusing how often Grammar Nazis are wrong about the very things they insist are "stupid" or "ignorant."  It really is such a perfect combination of hypocrisy, ignorance, and smugness."

Is someone a grammar nazi because you define them as such? Because some might define you as one... Which would make the hypocrisy accusation particularly accurate...
 
2012-12-22 04:41:45 PM  
Warsh. It's probably already been mentioned, but my old man is from IL and he pronounces wash as "warsh" among a few other words really strangely like cul-de-sac and some others I'm forgetting right now. I tried to explain that there is no r in the word wash, but he's 42, too old to change him now-but I inwardly giggle every week on laundry day and he knows it. And I guess it's more of a mid-western dialect thing as he's from a really small town. His son, however, can still be saved, and I try to correct his pronunciation a little bit here and there. Want the kid to get into college and sound reasonably intelligent when he starts dating. We'll be warshing all of our clothes tomorrow, I s'pose.
 
2012-12-22 04:50:34 PM  
specialkae:

Warsh. It's probably already been mentioned, but my old man is from IL and he pronounces wash as "warsh" among a few other words really strangely like cul-de-sac and some others I'm forgetting right now. I tried to explain that there is no r in the word wash, but he's 42, too old to change him now-but I inwardly giggle every week on laundry day and he knows it. And I guess it's more of a mid-western dialect thing as he's from a really small town. His son, however, can still be saved, and I try to correct his pronunciation a little bit here and there. Want the kid to get into college and sound reasonably intelligent when he starts dating. We'll be warshing all of our clothes tomorrow, I s'pose.

Yeah, I used to catch hell for that from my ex... "WHERE DID THE R COME FROM?!?!?"

Bawlmore / Warshington, I guess.
 
2012-12-22 05:12:03 PM  
I know a carpenter who thinks that the proper terms for measuring a box or cabinet is length, width and heighth. Aacck!!  It's just plain height.
 
2012-12-22 05:31:12 PM  
Peripherally -- per-if-ee-al-lee
Simultaneously -- sime-yoo-tain-eeus
 
2012-12-22 05:37:06 PM  
Is "amidst" a proper word, or just a poetic ornamentation of "amid"

/too lazy to google.
 
2012-12-22 05:39:20 PM  

FizixJunkee: Yeah, I've heard this, too. I don't know how or why anyone would say "disorientated."


Maybe because they're disorientated?
 
2012-12-22 06:24:47 PM  

basilbrush: Everyone besides me pronounces "sour" wrong, unless it does in fact have a "w" in it.


the hell?

What are you talking about? "our" forces your lips into "w" shape. Its supposed to sound like that.
 
2012-12-22 06:26:37 PM  

Wenchmaster:
Slightly related note: I once got in an argument with a Navy Commander about the proper use of the apostrophe in "its". He insisted on applying the apostrophe to the possessive, and I told him he was wrong (my tendency to tell people of higher rank they were wrong probably contributed to my lack of promotion in the service, btw). It mattered, because I was in charge of the work center with the engraving machine for that particular ship, and my guys had delivered a commemorative brass placard to the Commander for some function or another. Commander Spellsbadly insisted we re-do the work because of the apostrophe, and I told him no.
(/csb)


That was a cool story. You being respectful despite his dumbassness probably made him even madder. Kudos. Where is the gottamnded humility anymore?
/btw, what is the farking headline song s'posed to be?
 
2012-12-22 06:35:00 PM  

Stinkyy: /btw, what is the farking headline song s'posed to be?


I think it's this.
 
2012-12-22 06:41:31 PM  

JonnyBGoode: Wistersistersistershire sauce.

Bascetti? (Spaghetti, usually a kids; thing)

My ex used to pronounce syrup "surp." Drove me crazy.

Also, sWords.



Hey Brian, would you like some Cool Hwip? How about some Hweat Thins?"


I call it wherestheshiatter sauce.
 
2012-12-22 06:47:09 PM  

Dayglo Brown: Warsh.


My mom says it that way. Drives me bonkers.
 
2012-12-22 06:51:08 PM  

Stinkyy: That was a cool story. You being respectful despite his dumbassness probably made him even madder. Kudos. Where is the gottamnded humility anymore?
/btw, what is the farking headline song s'posed to be?


Should have asked for written orders. THAT would be funny if one of his superiors pointed it out to him after and he tried to chew you out for it after.

And the song is from a bit by the muppets. Banamanam.
 
2012-12-22 06:57:56 PM  

HotWingAgenda: I used to have a coworker that said "flustrated".  Very bright person, but they absolutely could not pronounce that first R.

My sister insisted the correct way to pronounce pronunciation was "pronounciation" right up until she finished college and got accepted to a prestigious law school.

My biggest pet peeve is chipotle, though.  It's the name of a major chain restaurant, for crying out loud.  The L comes AFTER the T.


Flustrated is a perfectly cromulent word. It's a compound word created from flustered and frustrated.
 
2012-12-22 07:13:03 PM  
I am 40 years old and I have never once spelled the word seperate separate correctly on the first attempt.
 
2012-12-22 07:37:50 PM  
I narrated a training course and they asked me to retake every incident of the word "resources." I naturally pronounce it as "reZourses" and they wanted "reSources." Now it trips me up every freakin time I have to say it.
 
2012-12-22 07:38:37 PM  
Damn it Subby, thats gonna stick with me.  And also, Muppets.
 
2012-12-22 07:48:46 PM  
Thanks for the song. 23M views and I'd never heard it, at least lately. *I* must be obscure.
 
2012-12-22 07:50:10 PM  

Z-clipped: buckler: I had a kid whose speech was all kind of farked up at six, because his mom thought his mispronunciations were 'cute'. He made some really bizarre sound substitutions. When he asked for a drink, he'd say "I bant a sink of bawter." It took him years to overcome it.

[readsq.com image 356x439]

"May I mambo dogface to the banana patch?"

/get that kid a "special" test

Mad_Radhu: One really common mispronounced word is forte, which is really pronounced like "fort". Of course, if you do pronounce it correctly, people will think you are an idiot.

Linguistics is one of my personal louds.

omeganuepsilon: If you have a serious problem with it, don't move to the southern US.

Imma gonna 'gree with y'all on that point.

kellythecat: what about bagel?

Maybe it's because I grew up mostly in NYC, but for some reason it farking kills me when people from the west coast say "Beggle". And even though I know it's a large portion of the country that does this, I can't understand why people think that "Merry" "Marry" and "Mary" are homophones.

Medical, Matter, Mason.
Merry, marry, Mary. How hard is that?


I was audio engineering for a friend narrating Sci-Fi/Fantasy novels. He's from Kalamazoo, Michigan and his "a's" are all flat. I wanted to kill the author every time we encountered a Centaur or Minotaur because they came out as CenTAR and MinoTAR and as a New Yorker I couldn't let that shiat stand.
 
2012-12-22 08:57:18 PM  

Molokai: Posting my Weeners ever, to say that this is the best headline ever.


LOL! Filter-Pwned on his Boobies.
 
2012-12-22 09:32:58 PM  

Koodz: omeganuepsilon: Hand Banana: I've seen quite a few people saying and writing it as prolly and it drives me crazy.

I see a distinction there....

There are people who say it that way 24/7 and don't know better, and people who say it as a casual affectation.

I say "howdy", "yall", "yonder" "prolly", almost as a joke, because language is fun to play with and it never hurts to be ridiculus on occasion. It's when people only speak that way and are incapable of sounding intelligent, that's when it's gotten ridiculous.

If you're good you can even do it in a professional environment, as a means of displaying that you're not super serial all of the time, that you're personable and get on with people.

If you have a serious problem with it, don't move to the southern US.

This is my dream. I spent years in Japan working with Canadians, Brits, and Australians and developed a very neutral Mid-Atlantic accent, but I dream of someday getting good enough at something that I can let my real accent come back.

/ever seen Sergeant York?
//that's my whole family
///probably misusing slashies


It's more of a per-individual basis in my experience. Some people would just rather deal with a "good ol' boy" than someone who's officious sounding. YMMV of course.

Maybe that real turn of the era high-class/distinguished southern accent could be universally acceptable, same way some of the more affluent Britons have a bit more simply granted respect.

I am the polar opposite. I've got that generic mid west accent. No southern, no Fargo/nordic/amish, no NY or Boston. No accent by default, but I do find I tend to mimic who I'm with. Going to England was a blast. Took a while to get it down, but worth it.... if you have that generic accent in a loud club and you order a drink without an accent they won't know WTF you're talking about. You really wouldn't think the accent for "Rum -n- Coke" or "vodak redbull" would make a difference, but it can.

/can't think of the right descriptor for that high falutin' style of accent
//slashies are very difficult to misuse
///only way I can think of is using them as a signature or trademark
////ie irrelevant to the post(and exactly the same in all threads) and more about advertising how cool/hip/unique/clever you are
///like people that randomly add "esquire" to their name to sound/look impressive
//just think back to English class and how to write letters
/simple post script or afterthought..or disclaimers
 
2012-12-22 09:35:12 PM  

Snapper Carr: ciberido: But I'll admit I'm slightly curious why you think there's something wrong with with the common pronunciation

I'm slightly curious why you're making a big deal out of this. It's not like a go around yelling at people for mispronouncing the word. I'm just pointing out a commonly (almost universally really) mispronounced word in a thread of commonly mispronounced words.


You brought it up but I'm the one " making a big deal out of this "?  Whatever you say, chief.
 
2012-12-22 09:43:46 PM  
 ciberido"I will say again I find it amusing how often Grammar Nazis are wrong about the very things they insist are "stupid" or "ignorant."  It really is such a perfect combination of hypocrisy, ignorance, and smugness."

o'really:Is someone a grammar nazi because you define them as such? Because some might define you as one... Which would make the hypocrisy accusation particularly accurate...

Grammar Nazis are prescriptivist.  I am not prescriptivist.  Therefore, while I may have many faults (including hypocrisy  perhaps), being a Grammaz Nazi is not one of them.

Feel free to call me a Grammar Nazi, however, if it helps you to feel a little bit better about yourself.
 
2012-12-22 09:57:47 PM  
"People always find a way of simplifying words that they find difficult to get their tongues round, so that an everyday word like 'handbag' sounds like 'hambag'.

Now I remember first hearing it as "hambag" when I was a little kid. It became obvious to me later that people were just pronouncing the word too quickly for me to have heard the right sounds, but at the time it confused me because those things had nothing to do with ham or any other sort of meat.
 
2012-12-22 10:03:13 PM  

Thunderboy: Benjimin_Dover:
They used the wrong word not mispronounced the right word.

It's like saying somebody mispronounced the word "car" by saying "truck."

StashMonster:

eh? Phenomena is the plural, phenomenon the singular. I don't understand what you are saying ... that he misuses the plural?

Clearly I need to provide more context!

I currently edit audio books for a living. The individual in question was narrating a book they wrote. Upon encountering the word "phenomenon", this individual pronounced it "phenomena". This isn't about using the wrong word or form of a word, it is about reading a word and not pronouncing it correctly. The word "phenomena" also appeared many times in the book, and was pronounced correctly.

This is a common issue with books read by the author. I don't recall ever running into this issue with books read by professional voice actors.


That clears it up as I would have suggested having the person read the word in a sentence and see how he pronounced it.
 
2012-12-22 10:04:16 PM  

ciberido: ciberido:  "I will say again I find it amusing how often Grammar Nazis are wrong about the very things they insist are "stupid" or "ignorant."  It really is such a perfect combination of hypocrisy, ignorance, and smugness."

o'really:Is someone a grammar nazi because you define them as such? Because some might define you as one... Which would make the hypocrisy accusation particularly accurate...

Grammar Nazis are prescriptivist.  I am not prescriptivist.  Therefore, while I may have many faults (including hypocrisy  perhaps), being a Grammaz Nazi is not one of them.

Feel free to call me a Grammar Nazi, however, if it helps you to feel a little bit better about yourself.


I'm with you.

There are those that think we should follow rule X because it's "proper", and those that realize those rules are more of a description of language, a guideline for those learning it, not something to dictate language.

Language, communication in general, is an evolving beast, and stringent protocol impedes progress as often, maybe more so, than it creates clarity and efficiency. That protocol, for it's convoluted nature, sometimes directly misses it's purpose of clarity and efficiency, in addition to limiting the ability to adapt.


Like dictionaries. They define and describe what we the people speak, not dictate what we mean.
 
2012-12-22 10:23:09 PM  

stu1-1: Ask - Axe (seems to be a racial thing, not American)


I actually used to hear "axe" a lot from working-class white southerners.
 
2012-12-22 10:26:35 PM  

Z-clipped: Mad_Radhu: One really common mispronounced word is forte, which is really pronounced like "fort". Of course, if you do pronounce it correctly, people will think you are an idiot.

Linguistics is one of my personal louds.


A common misconception, taught to musical n00bs for simplicity, is that forte means loud. It actually means strong but not always loud. It depends on the context of the piece.
 
2012-12-22 11:18:25 PM  

Tobin_Lam: Z-clipped: Mad_Radhu: One really common mispronounced word is forte, which is really pronounced like "fort". Of course, if you do pronounce it correctly, people will think you are an idiot.

Linguistics is one of my personal louds.

A common misconception, taught to musical n00bs for simplicity, is that forte means loud. It actually means strong but not always loud. It depends on the context of the piece.


Forte actually has a lot more meanings than that, even, outside of the musical context. I was just making a joke.

When I see forte in a piece of vocal music, I read it as, "powerful", because it reminds me to consider my breath support.


ciberido-

I know, man. I was just fooling around. Making fun of the way the folks across the river talk is one of the oldest pastimes in human history. I wasn't implying that anyone here is ignorant or incapable.

Though now that you mention it, ignorance IS one of the main factors that drives morphological and phonetic divergence. And that's fine. It's not an insult to say that settlers in the 1800s were ignorant. Many of them were. It's clear that fashion is also a driving factor, as the intelligentsia of the same era experienced some drastic changes in dialect as well.

It's all good. If everyone talked the same, the world would be poorer, and I wouldn't be able to give my southern cousins shiat over whether they were asking me for a small, sharp piece of metal or a writing implement.
 
2012-12-22 11:32:52 PM  
cool story:
When I saw the lead singer/songwriter's name of Neutral Milk Hotel, I thought it read "Jeff Magnum". I was like "whoa, coolest last name EVER!"
but then I re-read it,
and it was "Mangum" :(
 
2012-12-22 11:33:51 PM  
ciberido
 ciberido:  "I will say again I find it amusing how often Grammar Nazis are wrong about the very things they insist are "stupid" or "ignorant."  It really is such a perfect combination of hypocrisy, ignorance, and smugness."

o'really:Is someone a grammar nazi because you define them as such? Because some might define you as one... Which would make the hypocrisy accusation particularly accurate...

Grammar Nazis are prescriptivist.  I am not prescriptivist.  Therefore, while I may have many faults (including hypocrisy  perhaps), being a Grammaz Nazi is not one of them.

Feel free to call me a Grammar Nazi, however, if it helps you to feel a little bit better about yourself."

I wasn't defining you as one, your link helps. I just always thought the generally accepted definition of "grammar nazi" was people who frequently criticize others' grammar. Which you are arguing about just as much as anyone else. Your definition of "y'all" as "part of the american english language, get over it" seemed particularly condescending.

/I'm certainly no expert but I have been known to correct the grammar of others.
 
2012-12-22 11:34:48 PM  

ciberido: ChildOfBhaal: omeganuepsilon: Hand Banana: I've seen quite a few people saying and writing it as prolly and it drives me crazy.

I say "howdy", "yall", "yonder" "prolly", almost as a joke, because language is fun to play with and it never hurts to be ridiculus on occasion. It's when people only speak that way and are incapable of sounding intelligent, that's when it's gotten ridiculous.

What's wrong with yonder? Perfectly good, correctly pronounced word.

"Y'all" is second-person plural in American English .  I eschew it when dealing with non-Americans in the same way an Australian might avoid the word "ute" in an international setting.  If American English is your first language, then there is no excuse for you complaining about "y'all."  It's part of the language.  Deal with it.


Not trying to argue with you, but don't you find the use of y'all to be more complex than simple second person plural?

My understanding is that it can communicate grouping in a more subtle way. It can be said to one person to refer only to them, or to some group to which they belong, but excludes the speaker. It can refer to a group directly, or one can use the more inclusive "ally'all" to include a heterogeneous group, or multiple groups.

This all comes to me from some educated southern speakers, not from my own experience, so I may have some of the details wrong. But I've definitely experienced y'all referring to a single person in certain contexts. If there's any truth to the finer distinctions, I think it would make y'all one of the more interesting words in the English language.
 
2012-12-22 11:45:44 PM  
How can there be 300 comments and no mention of 'should've' being pronounced 'should of'. It drives me crazy whenever I hear anyone pronounce it that way, and seeing it written out as "should of" makes me all stabby.
 
2012-12-23 12:03:28 AM  

Farnn: How can there be 300 comments and no mention of 'should've' being pronounced 'should of'. It drives me crazy whenever I hear anyone pronounce it that way, and seeing it written out as "should of" makes me all stabby.


I'm guilty of this.
 
2012-12-23 12:06:31 AM  
Ciberido: "Grammar Nazis are prescriptivist.  I am not prescriptivist.  Therefore, while I may have many faults (including hypocrisy  perhaps), being a Grammaz Nazi is not one of them.

Feel free to call me a Grammar Nazi, however, if it helps you to feel a little bit better about yourself."

My asking what your definition of a grammar nazi was honest, but I should apologize for my biatchy passive way of stating it.
 
2012-12-23 12:10:51 AM  

LeGnome: Mock26: Let us not judge those who cannot pronounce words. Let us instead pass judgement on those who cannot spell!

:-D

I'm not sure 1) what you're saying here, and 2) if you're serious. "Phenomenon" is pronounced with the terminal "n" voiced. It sounds like it is spelled. "Phenomena" is the plural of the word "phenomenon," and also sounds like it is spelled, assuming you dig the whole "ph" = "f" thing.


There is only one "e" in judgment. I was just making a spelling joke.
 
2012-12-23 01:05:05 AM  
A bunch of rubes I know pronounce vodak as "vod-ka"
 
2012-12-23 02:42:53 AM  

Farnn: How can there be 300 comments and no mention of 'should've' being pronounced 'should of'. It drives me crazy whenever I hear anyone pronounce it that way, and seeing it written out as "should of" makes me all stabby.


You should of said something earlier.
 
2012-12-23 03:21:30 AM  

maxheck: Beurau... Bureauru... fark it. For whatever reason I have never been able to spell that word


It comes from French. Write the word "bureau"---one of its French meanings is "desk"---and then tack on a "-cracy" to the end: bureaucracy.

Piece of cake.
 
2012-12-23 03:28:07 AM  

FizixJunkee: maxheck: Beurau... Bureauru... fark it. For whatever reason I have never been able to spell that word

It comes from French. Write the word "bureau"---one of its French meanings is "desk"---and then tack on a "-cracy" to the end: bureaucracy.

Piece of cake.


I think he's saying he can't spell bureau.
 
2012-12-23 03:29:32 AM  

Farnn: How can there be 300 comments and no mention of 'should've' being pronounced 'should of'. It drives me crazy whenever I hear anyone pronounce it that way, and seeing it written out as "should of" makes me all stabby.


Or worse, "shoulda have". You can thank Mariah Carey.
 
2012-12-23 05:32:04 AM  

Lorelle: For Americans, the 10 words are:

Mischievous
Jewelry
Library
February
Kindergarten
Ask
Sherbet
Probably
Nuclear
Pronunciation


Roof.
 
2012-12-23 06:33:54 AM  
"Ask" -> "axe" and "kindergarten" -> "kindergarden" are dialectal. I have a Southern Californian accent and mispronounce "kindergarten" the same way I mispronounce "latter" as "ladder". We turn pretty much all intervocalic T's into D's, and trailing T's into glottal stops. I say "ask" "correctly", but other dialects do say "axe". Other dialects do things like "else" -> "elts", "mince" -> "mints"; this seems to be becoming more common.

My dialectal profile:
" "father" and "bother" use the same first vowel, closest to "father" in those who distinguish the two.
* As noted above, trailing T's generally become glottal stops; we pronounce "what" and "cat" by cutting off the vowel rather than a T sound.
* "latter" = "ladder"
* "whale" = "wail"
* "cot" = "caught"
* "him" not equal to "hem".
* "cheater" instead of "cheat".
* "favorite" usually omits the middle vowel.
* "mature" has a "ch" sound, and both vowels are schwas.
* "soda" instead of "pop" or non-specific "coke" ("coke" is used for Coca Cola or Pepsi, or Charlie Sheen's favorite thing in the world)
* "freeway" instead of "beltway", "interstate", "expressway". Big surprise that "freeway" would be the dominant word in Southern California. Our least favorite numbers are 4, 0 and 5.
* "toll road" instead of "tollway" or "turnpike".
* The plural second-person pronoun is often "you all"; this is equivalent to in usage to other dialects' "y'all", except that it's not contracted.
* "What did" -> "wuhd", which I write as "what'd". "What did you do last night?" becomes something like "wuh ju do last night?".

There are also some things I say weirdly that are personal rather than characteristic of my dialect; for example, I pronounce "comparable" as "compare-able" rather than the usual irregular form "comp-erable" that my parents and most others use. I attribute this and similar situations to having seen some words written long before I heard them pronounced.

Wednesday has been "mispronounced" for centuries. Are we supposed to go back to saying "Woden's Day"? (Or to use modern English naming of Norse mythology, "Odin's Day"?)
 
2012-12-23 06:41:18 AM  

Tobin_Lam: A common misconception, taught to musical n00bs for simplicity, is that forte means loud. It actually means strong but not always loud. It depends on the context of the piece.


"forte" means both "strong" and "loud". I know this from Spanish (i.e. "fuerte"), and Google Translate seems to agree regarding Italian.

Why can't musicians call "octaves" a more correct term like "septave" or "dodecave", since there are either 7 or 12 notes (depending on perspective) used by Western music within a frequency-doubling period? You generally select 7 out of 12.
 
2012-12-23 07:20:27 AM  

Myria: Tobin_Lam: A common misconception, taught to musical n00bs for simplicity, is that forte means loud. It actually means strong but not always loud. It depends on the context of the piece.

"forte" means both "strong" and "loud". I know this from Spanish (i.e. "fuerte"), and Google Translate seems to agree regarding Italian.

Why can't musicians call "octaves" a more correct term like "septave" or "dodecave", since there are either 7 or 12 notes (depending on perspective) used by Western music within a frequency-doubling period? You generally select 7 out of 12.


Octave = eighth scale degree. A "septave" or "dodectave" (cromulence pending) would be the seventh and twelfth ( functionally the fifth) scale degrees, respectively.
 
2012-12-23 07:44:10 AM  

Myria: * "cot" = "caught"


Even though I know this merger is supposed to be very, very common in the US, I can't remember ever hearing it in person. I'm not trying to be a smartass here, but do you also pronounce "caulk" and "cock" as homophones? Or is the merger limited to cot/caught? Also, I had a friend from Reno who pronounced "closet" like "claws-it". Is that common where you are?

Myria: Why can't musicians call "octaves" a more correct term like "septave" or "dodecave", since there are either 7 or 12 notes (depending on perspective) used by Western music within a frequency-doubling period? You generally select 7 out of 12.


Music theory is related to mathematics and acoustics, but there is a difference in terminology between them. The word 'interval" implies the nth note in relation to the tonic, not the sum of the number of steps between them. Hence, one whole tone is a major second, and the octave is the 8th tone in a diatonic scale. Diatonic intervals and chromatic intervals are also different from each other, because of how they are derived, so attempting to merge them for the sake of consistency runs afoul of the 3rds/5ths problem.

Basically, the answer is that people learned to play music long before they learned the physics behind it. It's also worth noting that for centuries in Western Europe, this type of counting was common. If an event fell on Sunday, for example, the following Sunday was referred to as the "octave" because it was the "eighth day" by inclusive reckoning.
 
2012-12-23 07:57:33 AM  
Myria:

Actually, come to think of it, the French still say "quinze jours" to mean "two weeks". But to be fair, they say "premier etage" where we say "2nd floor".
 
2012-12-23 08:01:23 AM  

kittycore: thisispete: 20/20: Personal pet peeve this time of year; singers who say "Sanna" for Santa Claus.
Just curious; how many people say the "h" in herb?

In New Zealand we pronounce the "h". They might drop it in some British accents - for a relatively small area they have a lot of different accents, but I can't recall hearing any English or Scottish accent where it's dropped.

It's kind of viewed as an American shibboleth. If I hear someone say 'erbs, I know they're from the US.

My family is from Newfoundland - among all the other words we say funny, the 'h' always gets dropped off the beginning of words - "I'm goin' 'ome to me 'ouse for the 'erbs". My grandfather had a really heavy accent, and used to drive me bonkers by changing my name from 'Diana' to 'Doy-anner'.
Lard Jeezus.


Son of Newf parents here (grew up in NYC I did). Newfoundlandisms are hilarious. "George" is pronounced "Jarge" and it's what you call your wife. Good phrases, too--"Who can know the mind of a squid?" is said after somebody says/does something stupid.
 
2012-12-23 08:20:14 AM  
Whar pronunciation guide, whar???
 
2012-12-23 10:44:16 AM  

Night Night Cream Puff: DeerNuts: Swiss Colony: What gets me all stabby is people who insist on using 'I' when they should use 'me'.

Over-correction. Parents and teachers chide children who misuse "me" so much that people grow up afraid to use it, even in cases where it would be correct.

I can't even think of the last time I heard "myself" used correctly.

Correct: I pleasured myself this morning.

Incorrect: Your mom blew the pool boy and myself this morning.

While I agree that this one is annoying it's not a pronunciation problem. Stick to the issue at hand people!

Chi-pol-tay is the scourge of our existence thanks to the chain restaurant expanding. I saw an episode of some food show on the Food Network one day where they interviewed a lady that kept saying "chi-pol-tay." I wanted to punch the TV so much...


Is that anything like Giada pronouncing mascarpone as mars-capone-eh?
 
2012-12-23 11:06:43 AM  
Crap. Double-posting. Whatever.

Surprised that Ctrl+F doesn't find "foyer". (Foy-ay? Fo-yay? Pretty sure it's not Foy-yer.)

Also, chi-pol-tee is gonna make me choke a biatch one of these days.
 
2012-12-23 11:32:00 AM  
meh, foyer is more of a tomay-to, tomah-to example. even foy-yer is acceptable. it's like correcting someone on how to say croissant by using an overt French accent to it. Cruh-SONT or Qua-SON doenst matter. In Kentucky we have Paris and Versailles. No one says Pay-ree or Vur-sigh. They say Perris and Vur-saylz. but that's Kentucky for you.

but im in agreement on chi-POL-tay. drives me nuts. i managed a cajun restaurant and the rampant mispronunciations of the dishes from regulars who'd been in there 100s of times and knew how to say but refused to drove me batty. Most of them get etouffee correctly though and some of them refused to say the 'L' in creole. they only want Chicken Creo. but that's Kentucky for you.
 
2012-12-23 01:59:00 PM  

Mock26: LeGnome: Mock26: Let us not judge those who cannot pronounce words. Let us instead pass judgement on those who cannot spell!

:-D

I'm not sure 1) what you're saying here, and 2) if you're serious. "Phenomenon" is pronounced with the terminal "n" voiced. It sounds like it is spelled. "Phenomena" is the plural of the word "phenomenon," and also sounds like it is spelled, assuming you dig the whole "ph" = "f" thing.

There is only one "e" in judgment. I was just making a spelling joke.


"Judgement" is an acceptable spelling, so maybe he didn't get the joke. It's just not used so much in America. I remember in 8th grade writing it like that on a spelling test, and trying to argue with the teacher that it shouldn't have been marked as incorrect. She had a dictionary in the classroom that said "judgment" was the preferred form, but did have the other spelling.

It's one of those words with a silent "e" that can disappear when a suffix is added, like in "acknowledgment" - though the rule seems to have become popular only in the last couple centuries. "Acknowledgement" is still acceptable overseas.
 
2012-12-23 03:45:23 PM  
This has been a very interesting thread.  I would like to add that in all the Christmas time commercials I have yet to hear the word JEWELRY pronounced in the manner that I think is correct: joo-well-re (with a long e.)
Perhaps the " professional speakers"  are trying to change the world in their own small way?
 
2012-12-23 10:52:34 PM  

Yes this is dog: "And most people talk about 'Febry' and 'Wensday'."

I'm having a hard time wrapping my mind around Febry.


It's talking about British English where medicine is medsin, my is mee and Tuesdsay is choozday.

My grandma, who is a stuck up, 'rule Britannia', old world biatch, claims that in Britain everyone pronounces parliament as parl-ee-a-ment. Even though I've spent a long time in Australia, I'm also British and have never heard anyone but my grandma pronounce it like that.
 
2012-12-24 09:28:19 AM  
I salute the submitter from Afghanistan .... ace
 
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