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(Slash Gear)   Back in April, the Sutter's Mill meteorite entered atmosphere at 64,000 MPH or 7 times the speed of light   (slashgear.com) divider line 83
    More: Interesting, Sutter, meteorites, Peter Jenniskens, nuclear tests, Doppler, speed of light, meteorite impact, Northern California  
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8387 clicks; posted to Geek » on 21 Dec 2012 at 10:57 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-21 03:41:01 PM

MayoSlather: Weird, I remember seeing a meteorite in the exact same area on seven different occasions shortly before the date given in the article.


Eventually, I will see what you did there.
 
2012-12-21 03:51:35 PM
That's some might slow light there, Lou.
 
2012-12-21 03:54:53 PM

The All-Powerful Atheismo: WordsnCollision: So if that meteor turned its headlights on, would they do anything?

[thecolonial.org image 463x260]

And that is the crux of relativity, Mr. Wright


And what about the crux of the biscuit?
 
2012-12-21 03:59:04 PM

The sound of one hand clapping: Now I'm curious what would have happened if it did enter the atmosphere at 7 times the speed of light. Could a 40,000kg meteor going at that speed wipe us all out? How big of a crater would it make?


Sir Isaac Newton is the deadliest son-of-a-biatch in space!
 
2012-12-21 04:07:02 PM

MmmmBacon: Subby is bad at the Maths. Public schooled?


You must be new here.
 
2012-12-21 04:27:18 PM

rpm: What are you talking about? Speed of light is 38 MPH, so this was going 1684 times the speed of light.


I'm too lazy to dig up the article, but someone (might have even been the same group of scientists) later stopped a light pulse completely then re-started it. So speed of light can be as low as 0 MPH, and the meteor was therefore going E104 Connection reset by peer
 
2012-12-21 04:31:28 PM

St_Francis_P: bamph: Probably a reference to the shuttle Columbia exploding.  One of the broadcast stations had a ticker on that said it reentered the atmosphere going 18 times the speed of light.

Sure, but that had rockets. This is just a rock!


On re-entry, the Shuttle is also a rock.
 
2012-12-21 04:31:30 PM
I wonder if I can rememer that Physics I took in school. as an object nears the speed of light its mass increases toward infinity while its size becomes infinitely small.

only one of these two premises is like Subbys Mom.
+
 
2012-12-21 04:44:30 PM

CptnSpldng: The All-Powerful Atheismo: WordsnCollision: So if that meteor turned its headlights on, would they do anything?

[thecolonial.org image 463x260]

And that is the crux of relativity, Mr. Wright

And what about the crux of the biscuit?


It's the Apostrophe.

Isn't Sutter's Mill where Orson Welles invaded the Earf?
 
2012-12-21 04:46:05 PM
weknowmemes.com
 
2012-12-21 04:48:48 PM

Luminiferous Aether: The sound of one hand clapping: Now I'm curious what would have happened if it did enter the atmosphere at 7 times the speed of light. Could a 40,000kg meteor going at that speed wipe us all out? How big of a crater would it make?

Sir Isaac Newton is the deadliest son-of-a-biatch in space!


s3.amazonaws.com
Approves.
 
das
2012-12-21 04:50:02 PM

Kyrgan: The sound of one hand clapping: Now I'm curious what would have happened if it did enter the atmosphere at 7 times the speed of light. Could a 40,000kg meteor going at that speed wipe us all out? How big of a crater would it make?

This from XKCD might give you an idea...


Nice find!!

Thanks!!
 
2012-12-21 05:10:12 PM
Kyrgan: The sound of one hand clapping: Now I'm curious what would have happened if it did enter the atmosphere at 7 times the speed of light. Could a 40,000kg meteor going at that speed wipe us all out? How big of a crater would it make?

To make it to the speed of light it can not have any mass, so it would just be an energy wave.
 
2012-12-21 05:36:25 PM

Saturn5: St_Francis_P: bamph: Probably a reference to the shuttle Columbia exploding.  One of the broadcast stations had a ticker on that said it reentered the atmosphere going 18 times the speed of light.

Sure, but that had rockets. This is just a rock!

On re-entry, the Shuttle is also a rock.


This serves as Saturn5s reminder: your sarcasm meter is overdue for calibration.
 
2012-12-21 05:57:01 PM
Twits. 64,000 MPH is 84 times the speed of sound light (at sea level)
 
2012-12-21 07:52:11 PM

madgordy: I wonder if I can rememer that Physics I took in school. as an object nears the speed of light its mass increases toward infinity while its size becomes infinitely small.

only one of these two premises is like Subbys Mom.
+


And the other is like Subbys Dad.
 
2012-12-21 09:46:58 PM

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: Speed is relative. Some chunk of rock coming into the solar system from elsewhere could be traveling at a significant percentage of light-speed, We really really need a working program to detect and blow these farkers into dust before they slam into a city somewhere. Yes, tremendous cost. But also unacceptable potential cost should we not have it. And the massive construction effort, both on the ground and in orbit, would help the economy.


Yes, yes, absolutely. Why don't you start with a system to predict and stop earthquakes? Should be easy, no?
 
2012-12-21 09:53:33 PM

Im_Gumby: [www.brandchannel.com image 207x270]

DO YOU DRINK
SUTTER
HOME?


Only if I'm at parent's for the holiday and it's the only thing left to drink with any alcoholic content. And I'm already drunk.
 
2012-12-21 10:08:16 PM

ThreadSinger: Luminiferous Aether: The sound of one hand clapping: Now I'm curious what would have happened if it did enter the atmosphere at 7 times the speed of light. Could a 40,000kg meteor going at that speed wipe us all out? How big of a crater would it make?

Sir Isaac Newton is the deadliest son-of-a-biatch in space!

[s3.amazonaws.com image 200x266]
Approves.


Who the fark is that?

/I played a much better looking Shepard...
 
2012-12-21 10:23:11 PM

blue_2501: ThreadSinger: Luminiferous Aether: The sound of one hand clapping: Now I'm curious what would have happened if it did enter the atmosphere at 7 times the speed of light. Could a 40,000kg meteor going at that speed wipe us all out? How big of a crater would it make?

Sir Isaac Newton is the deadliest son-of-a-biatch in space!

[s3.amazonaws.com image 200x266]
Approves.

Who the fark is that?

/I played a much better looking Shepard...


I believe it's the drill sergeant (or whatever the equivalent is) that you overhear chewing out one of his subordinates when you first visit the Citadel.
 
2012-12-21 10:51:22 PM
CptnSpldng

And what about the crux of the biscuit?
home.earthlink.net
 
2012-12-22 12:16:47 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: Just Another OC Homeless Guy: Speed is relative. Some chunk of rock coming into the solar system from elsewhere could be traveling at a significant percentage of light-speed, We really really need a working program to detect and blow these farkers into dust before they slam into a city somewhere. Yes, tremendous cost. But also unacceptable potential cost should we not have it. And the massive construction effort, both on the ground and in orbit, would help the economy.

Yes, yes, absolutely. Why don't you start with a system to predict and stop earthquakes? Should be easy, no?


Shush now, the adults are having a discussion.
 
2012-12-22 12:30:54 AM
I somehow hoped this story would have something to do with "The Adventures of Briscoe County Jr." But I guess that would've been Hutter's Mill.
 
2012-12-22 02:38:05 AM
There are a couple of videos showing CT scans of several meteorite fragments on YouTube:

Sutter's Mill - 73
Murchison - X0001
 
2012-12-22 03:37:19 AM
Math. Not even once.
 
2012-12-22 10:19:36 AM
exploded at an altitude of 48 km above the Earth's surface. The explosion was massive, releasing energy equivalent to 4 kilotons of TNT.

According to the scientists, that is about one fourth of the yield of the nuclear weapon detonated over Hiroshima.


Seems pretty big. So why is this the first we're hearing about it?
 
2012-12-22 10:35:27 AM

nytmare: exploded at an altitude of 48 km above the Earth's surface. The explosion was massive, releasing energy equivalent to 4 kilotons of TNT.

According to the scientists, that is about one fourth of the yield of the nuclear weapon detonated over Hiroshima.

Seems pretty big. So why is this the first we're hearing about it?


The altitude of the blast was much greater than the blast radius. Link
 
2012-12-22 11:18:21 AM

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: Quantum Apostrophe: Just Another OC Homeless Guy: Speed is relative. Some chunk of rock coming into the solar system from elsewhere could be traveling at a significant percentage of light-speed, We really really need a working program to detect and blow these farkers into dust before they slam into a city somewhere. Yes, tremendous cost. But also unacceptable potential cost should we not have it. And the massive construction effort, both on the ground and in orbit, would help the economy.

Yes, yes, absolutely. Why don't you start with a system to predict and stop earthquakes? Should be easy, no?

Shush now, the adults are having a discussion.


The Space Nutter reply, ladies and gentlemen. It's absolutely vital that the entire human race dedicate itself to building impossible things to defend ourselves from the Space Monsters, but the real threats that kill real people every year? Not important. We couldn't do anything about earthquakes anyways. The Earth is just a stupid rock after all.
 
2012-12-22 11:28:11 AM
cdn.abclocal.go.com

According to the scientists, any time the entry trajectory is picked up by measuring equipment on the ground it makes it much easier to find fragments of the meteorite once it impacts the Earth.
 
2012-12-22 12:03:08 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: Just Another OC Homeless Guy: Quantum Apostrophe: Just Another OC Homeless Guy: Speed is relative. Some chunk of rock coming into the solar system from elsewhere could be traveling at a significant percentage of light-speed, We really really need a working program to detect and blow these farkers into dust before they slam into a city somewhere. Yes, tremendous cost. But also unacceptable potential cost should we not have it. And the massive construction effort, both on the ground and in orbit, would help the economy.

Yes, yes, absolutely. Why don't you start with a system to predict and stop earthquakes? Should be easy, no?

Shush now, the adults are having a discussion.

The Space Nutter reply, ladies and gentlemen. It's absolutely vital that the entire human race dedicate itself to building impossible things to defend ourselves from the Space Monsters, but the real threats that kill real people every year? Not important. We couldn't do anything about earthquakes anyways. The Earth is just a stupid rock after all.


Sigh.Read your profile, so I'm not sure there is any use responding, but I'll try.

(1) Earthquakes are not extinction-level events. If they were, then I agree; by all means, yes, let us start with a system to predict and stop earthquakes. I ignored earthquakes (and other natural disasters like hurricanes and floods) because they are not extinction-level events.

(2) Yes, an effective defense system to stop incoming chunks of rock would be incredibly difficult and horrendously expensive to create, So was the Great Wall of China, the Manhattan Project, and the Aswan High Dam (to name just a few "impossible" projects accomplished by the human race). It is probably true that such a system would be the most difficult and expensive of all.

>>>>"...to defend ourselves from the Space Monsters...."

(3) Er.... no. Not space monsters, but big chunks of ice and rock left over from the solar system's formation, or rogues entering the solar system from outside.

(4) You sound a bit Luddite-ish. Please note that it has happened before. I'm sure there was at least one dinosaur with precisely your same attitude.

(5) There are incalculable spin-off cultural and economic benefits from such a mega-project, which would involve the whole world.

Now, will you PLEASE toddle off to bed?

(3)
 
2012-12-22 12:19:06 PM

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: (1) Earthquakes are not extinction-level events. If they were, then I agree; by all means, yes, let us start with a system to predict and stop earthquakes. I ignored earthquakes (and other natural disasters like hurricanes and floods) because they are not extinction-level events.


Such concern for the species! Is that like a religion?

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: (2) Yes, an effective defense system to stop incoming chunks of rock would be incredibly difficult and horrendously expensive to create, So was the Great Wall of China, the Manhattan Project, and the Aswan High Dam (to name just a few "impossible" projects accomplished by the human race). It is probably true that such a system would be the most difficult and expensive of all.


Yes, absolutely comparable in size and scope.

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: (3) Er.... no. Not space monsters, but big chunks of ice and rock left over from the solar system's formation, or rogues entering the solar system from outside.


We should also defend ourselves from bits of DNA left over from the random evolutionary processes that cause diseases like aging. Why not?

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: (4) You sound a bit Luddite-ish. Please note that it has happened before. I'm sure there was at least one dinosaur with precisely your same attitude.


Always the same argument. There is no such technology to be "Ludditish" against. That's my argument. Are you against life extension technology? Doesn't that make you an actual Luddite, since you know, we actually DO live longer?

And what is your argument to this: since the dinosaurs are extinct, this allowed US to evolve. What gives you the right to decide how life will evolve here in millions of years? Doesn't that same right allow me to want life extension? Life extension is possible, your cosmic shield (1980's loony bin sci-fi) is not. It's that simple.

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: (5) There are incalculable spin-off cultural and economic benefits from such a mega-project, which would involve the whole world.


So would life extension.

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: Now, will you PLEASE toddle off to bed?


Childish tone noted.

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: (3)


There is no (3).
 
2012-12-22 05:53:19 PM
Quantum Apostrophe:


I normally don't say this, since it is usually used as an excuse to not answer a question or evade a rational reply, but you've got to be trolling, right?

"(1) Earthquakes are not extinction-level events. If they were, then I agree; by all means, yes, let us start with a system to predict and stop earthquakes. I ignored earthquakes (and other natural disasters like hurricanes and floods) because they are not extinction-level events."

>>>>>>>>>>Such concern for the species! Is that like a religion?

??? Are YOU not concerned for the species? Actually, I've never really thought about it, but I really don't have a rational answer for WHY our species should continue, so perhaps it is a religious-type concept. But it concerns me that you apparently do not (but you at least partially contradict yourself below).

"Just Another OC Homeless Guy: (2) Yes, an effective defense system to stop incoming chunks of rock would be incredibly difficult and horrendously expensive to create, So was the Great Wall of China, the Manhattan Project, and the Aswan High Dam (to name just a few "impossible" projects accomplished by the human race). It is probably true that such a system would be the most difficult and expensive of all."

>>>>>>Yes, absolutely comparable in size and scope.

No, not necessarily. It would be a huge undertaking. Though, if you knew a little history - as apparently you don't - you would you would be able to see that in comparing the technology now -vs- then, it might be comparable in scope,

"Just Another OC Homeless Guy: (3) Er.... no. Not space monsters, but big chunks of ice and rock left over from the solar system's formation, or rogues entering the solar system from outside."

>>>>>>>We should also defend ourselves from bits of DNA left over from the random evolutionary processes that cause diseases like aging. Why not?

Totally agree. Actually, I'm looking forward to effective immortality (either biological, cybernetic, and/or virtual). And science is quickly zeroing in on all of that. BTW, your concern for life extension seems a bit at odds with your casual disregard, and humor, over concern for the species.

"Just Another OC Homeless Guy: (4) You sound a bit Luddite-ish. Please note that it has happened before. I'm sure there was at least one dinosaur with precisely your same attitude."

>>>>>Always the same argument. There is no such technology to be "Ludditish" against. That's my argument. Are you against life extension technology? Doesn't that make you an actual Luddite, since you know, we actually DO live longer?

Your entire paragraph makes no sense. There IS nascent technology that can be expanded and used against asteroid/comet impacts: lasers and nukes to make small rocks out of big ones, strap-on jato units to change their orbits, etc. It simply needs to be funded and accomplished. A first big step would be to expand our ability to find and track errant rocks. As for your assumption that I'm against LET, where in the world did you get that idea?

>>>>>And what is your argument to this: since the dinosaurs are extinct, this allowed US to evolve. What gives you the right to decide how life will evolve here in millions of years?

What gives YOU the right to deny others the ability to defend their lives and descendents against cosmic accidents? You sound pretty selfish, to me.

>>>>>Doesn't that same right allow me to want life extension?

Yes, it does. And, as I said, I'm all for it.

>>>>>Life extension is possible, your cosmic shield (1980's loony bin sci-fi) is not. It's that simple.

Really? Why not? What is there about the concept of blowing up, or changing the orbit of, an asteroid that is not possible? Please share your apparently deep knowledge of this field with the rest of us. (Waiting for ad hominem and other irrational variations of "loony bin".)

"Just Another OC Homeless Guy: (5) There are incalculable spin-off cultural and economic benefits from such a mega-project, which would involve the whole world."

>>>>>So would life extension.

I agree. Actually, chances are it would result in a firestorm of worldwide pillage and murder if the one percenters tried to keep it for themselves, but that would probably be for the better. But, again, you seem obsessed with the idea that I'm not "for" LET, when I originally never said anything one way or the other about it.
 
2012-12-23 12:13:48 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: Just Another OC Homeless Guy: (1) Earthquakes are not extinction-level events. If they were, then I agree; by all means, yes, let us start with a system to predict and stop earthquakes. I ignored earthquakes (and other natural disasters like hurricanes and floods) because they are not extinction-level events.

Such concern for the species! Is that like a religion?

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: (2) Yes, an effective defense system to stop incoming chunks of rock would be incredibly difficult and horrendously expensive to create, So was the Great Wall of China, the Manhattan Project, and the Aswan High Dam (to name just a few "impossible" projects accomplished by the human race). It is probably true that such a system would be the most difficult and expensive of all.

Yes, absolutely comparable in size and scope.

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: (3) Er.... no. Not space monsters, but big chunks of ice and rock left over from the solar system's formation, or rogues entering the solar system from outside.

We should also defend ourselves from bits of DNA left over from the random evolutionary processes that cause diseases like aging. Why not?

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: (4) You sound a bit Luddite-ish. Please note that it has happened before. I'm sure there was at least one dinosaur with precisely your same attitude.

Always the same argument. There is no such technology to be "Ludditish" against. That's my argument. Are you against life extension technology? Doesn't that make you an actual Luddite, since you know, we actually DO live longer?

And what is your argument to this: since the dinosaurs are extinct, this allowed US to evolve. What gives you the right to decide how life will evolve here in millions of years? Doesn't that same right allow me to want life extension? Life extension is possible, your cosmic shield (1980's loony bin sci-fi) is not. It's that simple.

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: (5) There are incalculable spin-off cultural and economic benefits ...


You are either a gigantic moron of epic proportions or a troll who tries to hard. More likely a troll. The simple proof is not in you mere expressing a moronic opinion - but in your arguing against things that absolutely no one is saying. That is a dead giveaway right there
 
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