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(Slash Gear)   Back in April, the Sutter's Mill meteorite entered atmosphere at 64,000 MPH or 7 times the speed of light   (slashgear.com) divider line 83
    More: Interesting, Sutter, meteorites, Peter Jenniskens, nuclear tests, Doppler, speed of light, meteorite impact, Northern California  
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8388 clicks; posted to Geek » on 21 Dec 2012 at 10:57 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-21 08:24:40 AM  
Subby, do you write the news crawl for CNN?
 
2012-12-21 08:30:32 AM  
Subby is bad at the Maths. Public schooled?
 
2012-12-21 08:39:16 AM  
notsureifserious.jpg
 
2012-12-21 08:50:51 AM  
It stole my bike too.
 
2012-12-21 09:06:18 AM  
Probably a reference to the shuttle Columbia exploding.  One of the broadcast stations had a ticker on that said it reentered the atmosphere going 18 times the speed of light.
 
2012-12-21 09:15:21 AM  

bamph: Probably a reference to the shuttle Columbia exploding.  One of the broadcast stations had a ticker on that said it reentered the atmosphere going 18 times the speed of light.


Sure, but that had rockets. This is just a rock!
 
2012-12-21 09:23:25 AM  

Elvis_Bogart: Subby, do you write the news crawl for CNN?


s9.postimage.org
 
2012-12-21 10:11:02 AM  
i522.photobucket.com
 
2012-12-21 10:56:11 AM  
And right over my house just seconds before it detonated over Coloma

/nearly wet myself
//I think one of the cats did
 
2012-12-21 11:03:32 AM  

St_Francis_P: bamph: Probably a reference to the shuttle Columbia exploding.  One of the broadcast stations had a ticker on that said it reentered the atmosphere going 18 times the speed of light.

Sure, but that had rockets. This is just a rock!


Why do you think it's only going 7 times the speed of light?!
 
2012-12-21 11:05:34 AM  
FTFA: "For scientist Peter Jenniskens, the meteorite impacted right near his base of operations meaning he only had to drive a few hours to search for fragments from the meteorite."

Did the event occur in a different location if you were a different scientist? That's like a Lovecraftian meteorite right there.
 
2012-12-21 11:08:24 AM  

somedude210: St_Francis_P: bamph: Probably a reference to the shuttle Columbia exploding.  One of the broadcast stations had a ticker on that said it reentered the atmosphere going 18 times the speed of light.

Sure, but that had rockets. This is just a rock!

Why do you think it's only going 7 times the speed of light?!


That's the fastest a rock could go without the aid of dilithium crystals to control the matter-antimatter reactor. Silly.
 
2012-12-21 11:19:12 AM  
Ludicrous speed now.
 
2012-12-21 11:21:51 AM  
Lazy light. Get a move on!
 
2012-12-21 11:34:27 AM  
Where did the speed of light thing come from?

0.00955794504181601%
 
2012-12-21 11:35:11 AM  
There's gold in them thar hills.
 
2012-12-21 11:38:48 AM  
Meh. Bad news travels much faster.
 
2012-12-21 11:39:10 AM  

the.swartz: Where did the speed of light thing come from?

0.00955794504181601%


Einstein's ruminations on the Lorentz transform and the Michelson-Morley experiment.
 
2012-12-21 11:44:39 AM  
See, I always thought that it was some natural event, not an actual cannon shot, at Sutter's Mill that started the Civil War. I think this supports that.
 
2012-12-21 11:56:03 AM  

the.swartz: Where did the speed of light thing come from?


The first decent measurement was noticed when it was figured out that Io appeared from behind Jupiter several minutes behind schedule when Earth and Jupiter were at their relative apogee.
 
2012-12-21 11:59:31 AM  
"metorities" don't "enter the atmosphere" at any speed. Only Meteors.

/study it out
 
2012-12-21 12:09:51 PM  
Well played, Subby, only it's almost not fair to rouse some Farkers before they've ingested their morning ration of caffeine.
 
2012-12-21 12:12:22 PM  
www.fastcustomshirts.com
 
2012-12-21 12:14:10 PM  

Stone Meadow: Well played, Subby, only it's almost not fair to rouse some Farkers before they've ingested their morning ration of caffeine.


Thank you kindly, sir
 
2012-12-21 12:16:07 PM  
Oh Shane McGlaun you lunkhead!
 
2012-12-21 12:33:35 PM  
www.brandchannel.com

DO YOU DRINK
SUTTER
HOME?
 
2012-12-21 12:37:19 PM  
Wow that's fast !

I am pretty quick myself .

At night when I shut the wall switch off . I am in bed before the the light goes out.

I have to duck going around second base when I hit a line drive.

I have had premature ejaculations months in advance.
 
2012-12-21 12:45:36 PM  

Dr.Mxyzptlk.: Wow that's fast !

I am pretty quick myself .

At night when I shut the wall switch off . I am in bed before the the light goes out.

I have to duck going around second base when I hit a line drive.

I have had premature ejaculations months in advance.


I believe one of those.
 
2012-12-21 12:45:48 PM  
So if that meteor turned its headlights on, would they do anything?

thecolonial.org
 
2012-12-21 12:48:25 PM  
Weird, I remember seeing a meteorite in the exact same area on seven different occasions shortly before the date given in the article.
 
2012-12-21 01:01:49 PM  

Johnson: "metorities" don't "enter the atmosphere" at any speed. Only Meteors.

/study it out


Sort of a pedantic distinction. All meteorites were at one point meteors; they just happen to be the ones that survived the whole trip.
 
2012-12-21 01:14:39 PM  

nmemkha: Meh. Bad news travels much faster.


This.

Speed is relative. Some chunk of rock coming into the solar system from elsewhere could be traveling at a significant percentage of light-speed, We really really need a working program to detect and blow these farkers into dust before they slam into a city somewhere. Yes, tremendous cost. But also unacceptable potential cost should we not have it. And the massive construction effort, both on the ground and in orbit, would help the economy.
 
2012-12-21 01:28:11 PM  

Elvis_Bogart: Subby, do you write the news crawl for CNN?


At least someone else remembers that. I remember actually making a screen cap of that! :D
 
2012-12-21 01:42:25 PM  
Now I'm curious what would have happened if it did enter the atmosphere at 7 times the speed of light. Could a 40,000kg meteor going at that speed wipe us all out? How big of a crater would it make?
 
2012-12-21 01:44:16 PM  

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: nmemkha: Meh. Bad news travels much faster.

This.

Speed is relative. Some chunk of rock coming into the solar system from elsewhere could be traveling at a significant percentage of light-speed, We really really need a working program to detect and blow these farkers into dust before they slam into a city somewhere. Yes, tremendous cost. But also unacceptable potential cost should we not have it. And the massive construction effort, both on the ground and in orbit, would help the economy.


On it!
latimesblogs.latimes.com
 
2012-12-21 01:46:38 PM  
It could have been worse. It could have been the Grover's Mill meteorite.

/Maybe the anti-vaxxers are on to something...
 
2012-12-21 01:49:54 PM  

The sound of one hand clapping: Now I'm curious what would have happened if it did enter the atmosphere at 7 times the speed of light. Could a 40,000kg meteor going at that speed wipe us all out? How big of a crater would it make?


This from XKCD might give you an idea...
 
2012-12-21 01:54:18 PM  

The sound of one hand clapping: Now I'm curious what would have happened if it did enter the atmosphere at 7 times the speed of light.


Uh oh, you have attempted to divide by zero.

www.gonzotimes.com

Could a 40,000kg meteor going at that speed wipe us all out? How big of a crater would it make?

A good place to start is the Purdue Impact Calculator.
 
2012-12-21 02:00:02 PM  

Kyrgan: The sound of one hand clapping: Now I'm curious what would have happened if it did enter the atmosphere at 7 times the speed of light. Could a 40,000kg meteor going at that speed wipe us all out? How big of a crater would it make?

This from XKCD might give you an idea...


Thanks for the link :) So it would kill us all. And rip the planet apart. So pretty cool to watch, not so cool if you are on Earth at the time.
 
2012-12-21 02:02:53 PM  

Sybarite: [i522.photobucket.com image 750x600]


Thanks for 'splainin the joke for me.
 
2012-12-21 02:29:58 PM  

WordsnCollision: So if that meteor turned its headlights on, would they do anything?

[thecolonial.org image 463x260]


And that is the crux of relativity, Mr. Wright
 
2012-12-21 02:34:26 PM  

Kyrgan: The sound of one hand clapping: Now I'm curious what would have happened if it did enter the atmosphere at 7 times the speed of light. Could a 40,000kg meteor going at that speed wipe us all out? How big of a crater would it make?

This from XKCD might give you an idea...


Whoa....
 
2012-12-21 02:38:08 PM  

Stone Meadow:

A good place to start is the Purdue Impact Calculator.


I love that site. Brightens my day to hit the earth with an osmium asteroid the size of the US at 41 miles per second.
 
2012-12-21 02:43:01 PM  
Given the speed of light I infer from this headline, I assume that Sutter's Mill Meteorite hit the atmosphere of Discworld, where the strong magical field slows light down to a slow, elegant crawl just above the speed of sound.
 
2012-12-21 02:55:28 PM  

Kyrgan: The sound of one hand clapping: Now I'm curious what would have happened if it did enter the atmosphere at 7 times the speed of light. Could a 40,000kg meteor going at that speed wipe us all out? How big of a crater would it make?

This from XKCD might give you an idea...


"I've always thought that one of the the great things about physics is that you can add more digits to any number and see what happens and nobody can stop you."

i.chzbgr.com
 
2012-12-21 03:02:42 PM  

Sybarite: [i522.photobucket.com image 750x600]


Thanks for the pic. Sad that it needed to be posted.

For the record, speed of light is 670,616,629 mph, so 64,000 mph is about 1/10th of 0.0095% of the SOL
 
2012-12-21 03:06:45 PM  

antnyjc: Stone Meadow:

A good place to start is the Purdue Impact Calculator.

I love that site. Brightens my day to hit the earth with an osmium asteroid the size of the US at 41 miles per second.


Yeah, me too. I started playing with its predecessor site when Apophis came to light, and have played with it ever since.

/it came straight out of the Arachnid Zone!!! ;^)
 
rpm
2012-12-21 03:27:21 PM  

Macular Degenerate: Sybarite: [i522.photobucket.com image 750x600]

Thanks for the pic. Sad that it needed to be posted.

For the record, speed of light is 670,616,629 mph, so 64,000 mph is about 1/10th of 0.0095% of the SOL


What are you talking about? Speed of light is 38 MPH, so this was going 1684 times the speed of light.

/you forgot two words.
 
2012-12-21 03:32:20 PM  
www.trbimg.com
 
2012-12-21 03:36:03 PM  

BalugaJoe: Ludicrous speed now.


They've gone to plaid!
 
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