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(The Star (UK))   Dementia crisis looming, according to plaid aardvark Colonel Sanders   (thestar.co.uk) divider line 40
    More: Sad, Colonel Sanders, dementia  
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4637 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Dec 2012 at 4:20 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-21 01:49:30 AM
The nurse is stealing my medicine.
 
2012-12-21 02:09:11 AM
Plus one for a good, oh look, theres a sale on pizza crusts
 
2012-12-21 02:32:26 AM
And don't you forget that the Easter Bunny only visits me on Wednesdays!
 
2012-12-21 04:22:14 AM
No! What? Stop bothering me while I'm fapping in cream cheese.
 
2012-12-21 04:38:18 AM
Worked with a 78 y.o. guy who owned some factories in Mexico. All this guy had ever done was work, and was still going strong with several operations in Mexico. And he would get weird every day in the late afternoon, start not making any kind of sense, doing something again that had been done the day before, firing people for no reason and all sorts of weird crap. But he would remember it the next day and try to undo the damage, so he was aware and finally admitted it openly but said fark you if you think I'm going home at 3, just ignore me, it's my building.
 
2012-12-21 04:38:19 AM
He's here to help!
blogs-images.forbes.com
 
2012-12-21 04:44:23 AM
It is already running rampant in congress.
 
2012-12-21 04:44:30 AM
The baby boomers couldn't be more deserving.

/christmas spirit, and all
 
2012-12-21 04:46:32 AM

robohobo: The baby boomers couldn't be more deserving.

/christmas spirit, and all


My parents are both boomers. I don't think either one of them deserve that. After watching what my grandmother went through, and my mother because of it, I wouldn't wish it on anyone.
 
2012-12-21 04:46:47 AM
Dementia?
content8.flixster.com
 
2012-12-21 04:51:45 AM

nicoffeine: robohobo: The baby boomers couldn't be more deserving.

/christmas spirit, and all

My parents are both boomers. I don't think either one of them deserve that. After watching what my grandmother went through, and my mother because of it, I wouldn't wish it on anyone.


Okay, fark apology. Christmas is a bad time for me. I'm being a dick. I really am sorry.
 
2012-12-21 05:28:15 AM
Friend of mines Pop has been losing his marbles for years. It's gotten so the man has to be under 24-hour supervision, and not allowed to cook for himself. He's now in an assisted-living facility where they pretty much do everything like keeping his apartment clean and he gets to eat in a restaurant setting. That place is costing about $4000 a month.

My Pop, I wonder sometimes. He's always been an airhead doofus but the last couple of years I've often wondered if the man isn't going seriously hardcore stupid. At least he hasn't become a TeaBagger yet.
 
2012-12-21 05:42:46 AM
Watermelon?
img248.imageshack.us
 
2012-12-21 05:49:37 AM

Insatiable Jesus: Worked with a 78 y.o. guy who owned some factories in Mexico. All this guy had ever done was work, and was still going strong with several operations in Mexico. And he would get weird every day in the late afternoon, start not making any kind of sense, doing something again that had been done the day before, firing people for no reason and all sorts of weird crap. But he would remember it the next day and try to undo the damage, so he was aware and finally admitted it openly but said fark you if you think I'm going home at 3, just ignore me, it's my building.


What did he make?
 
2012-12-21 05:50:02 AM
Can't be because people are living longer and our technology needs to catch up to biological reality? No? OK, cool, forget it, let's colonize the universe with beings that barely last long enough to leave our cosmic front door! Makes perfect sense. Don't forget to pack a 3D printer!
 
2012-12-21 06:11:19 AM
what happens if there's a mummy?
 
2012-12-21 06:19:26 AM
Turmeric.
 
2012-12-21 07:05:45 AM
I recently learned about things called anti-cholingerics. I don't claim to understand it, but from what I've read, certain drugs are anti-cholingeric, and they include things you would think are relatively safe like antacids to things you would assume have worse side effects like psychiatric drugs.

Anyhow, the more of these you take, the more you increase your risk for dementia and Alzheimer's, I believe (fittingly enough, I don't remember if it was both or just one of those two conditions).

I've always assumed I'm screwed when it comes to my brain because I started Ativan when I was 14 and am still on it at 30 along with Paxil and Seroquel, but I never knew that over the counter drugs could be contributing as well, so I've started being careful about those. I've read articles where a doctor will mention that an elderly patient took an antacid and became confused within hours, and there was a direct cause and effect, along with the long-term build-up. I never have had a doctor tell me side effects of any drugs let alone this whole thing about anti-cholinergics.

I am slowly (and I mean slowly, as in making almost no progress) tapering off my drugs, but I also take supplements (fish oil, multivitamin, magnesium, vitamin D3, Cinnulin PF (for my blood sugar)), and I've been researching this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosphatidylserine

I am very cautious of adding anything new to my regimen because things you wouldn't expect can interact with meds, but my psychiatrist actually wants me to add it (although she wants me to add it in prescription form: Vayarin, which is the same substance but contains omega-3s, which I already get from fish oil). There's also Vayacog, which is the same stuff in a higher dose. The only other difference is the target audience (ADHD vs. Alzheimer's). I have neither, but she prescribes it off label for her patients taking benzodiazepines. It's the first and only prescription medical food I've heard of, and it has orphan drug status (not exactly sure what that means either). I wrote to the company and find their spiel very suspicious. They claim it's better than taking phosphatidylserine and fish oil separately because they fuse them into one molecule, but their prescribing info sheet says otherwise. I also don't understand how it's a "food" if it's been synthesized into a new molecule. If I make salsa, do new molecules form?

I feel more comfortable taking it in OTC supplement form but haven't made a decision yet.

And I know my doctor is very chummy with their drugs reps, which probably affects her repeating the line that Vayarin is one special molecule where the omega-3s and phosphatidylserine in it can cross the brain-blood barrier whereas regular fish oil can't. I then said, if normal fish oil can't cross the brain blood barrier, how can you explain the study that showed regular fish oil was as effective as anti-depressants? She said something that was a lot of word salad that didn't make sense. I forget what it was. She sometimes keeps me waiting when she meets with them, and they bring Starbucks gift baskets and dress like whores. So I'm not sure I trust her on the science part.


Grumble Grumble.

She's actually a good psychiatrist compared to other psychiatrists in that she even looks into this stuff. Although . . . it's not too hard to look into stuff when it's being displayed to you on an iPad with fun graphics during a catered lunch by people pretend that they're in love with you.

Anyhow, literally some food for thought for you all!

And if anyone knows more about anti-cholinergics and or about phosphatidylserine, please share what you know!
 
2012-12-21 07:18:16 AM
What people fail to realize is that for many generations, old people would live with their kids for this reason. It was called senility, and a lot of old people had it. It was just the way things were. If you made it to old age, you got senile. Most people just never made it to old age. They died from infections like blood poisoning, or gout, or flu, or all manner of stuff that is managed today.

You grew up with a relative living in your house that was off, or you knew someone who had a bed-ridden relative. It's just now no one wants that person living in their home, because even with meds, it's a long drawn out form of death.
 
2012-12-21 07:34:47 AM

cherryl taggart: What people fail to realize is that for many generations, old people would live with their kids for this reason. It was called senility, and a lot of old people had it. It was just the way things were. If you made it to old age, you got senile. Most people just never made it to old age. They died from infections like blood poisoning, or gout, or flu, or all manner of stuff that is managed today.

You grew up with a relative living in your house that was off, or you knew someone who had a bed-ridden relative. It's just now no one wants that person living in their home, because even with meds, it's a long drawn out form of death.


Dementia is *not* a normal part of aging. It is not. Age-related cognitive decline and dementia are NOT the same thing.

Also, depression can mimic dementia in the elderly, and quite a few elderly have undiagnosed depression. If you have a loved one who you think has dementia, you owe it to them and yourself to get them a good thorough workup and to ask about depression. If a doctor tries to label you as Alzheimer's disease or dementia on your first visit, find a new doctor.
 
2012-12-21 07:36:39 AM

Insatiable Jesus: Worked with a 78 y.o. guy who owned some factories in Mexico. All this guy had ever done was work, and was still going strong with several operations in Mexico. And he would get weird every day in the late afternoon, start not making any kind of sense, doing something again that had been done the day before, firing people for no reason and all sorts of weird crap. But he would remember it the next day and try to undo the damage, so he was aware and finally admitted it openly but said fark you if you think I'm going home at 3, just ignore me, it's my building.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sundowning
 
2012-12-21 08:11:53 AM
10% of all patients who are diagnosed with Alzheimer and of Dementia actual have NPH (Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus. 85% of patients with NPH when diagnosed correctly return to a normal life.

He is a link to 60 Minutes show from 2004

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2004/10/04/60ii/main647205.shtml

My father had the same thing and I actually had to threat to sue his Neurologist to have the test done.

After the test he called my family into his office and stated he was wrong, and then asked me what I did for a living.

I Said I sold CD's, and he said Oh, you are a Banker, and I laughed and said no, I sold CD and Vinyl. Doctors hate being wrong,
especially when It's a dummy like me.

I have told to everyone I run across if a family member is diagnosed with Alzheimer and of Dementia to have them tested. It is a 5 minute Cat Scan.
Even when it can be seen of the scan, there are Doctors who refuse to diagnose it. We all have to be an advocate for a friend or relative when it comes to Doctors who do not now how to read a basic X-Ray.
 
2012-12-21 08:23:03 AM

biohazard76: cherryl taggart: What people fail to realize is that for many generations, old people would live with their kids for this reason. It was called senility, and a lot of old people had it. It was just the way things were. If you made it to old age, you got senile. Most people just never made it to old age. They died from infections like blood poisoning, or gout, or flu, or all manner of stuff that is managed today.

You grew up with a relative living in your house that was off, or you knew someone who had a bed-ridden relative. It's just now no one wants that person living in their home, because even with meds, it's a long drawn out form of death.

Dementia is *not* a normal part of aging. It is not. Age-related cognitive decline and dementia are NOT the same thing.

Also, depression can mimic dementia in the elderly, and quite a few elderly have undiagnosed depression. If you have a loved one who you think has dementia, you owe it to them and yourself to get them a good thorough workup and to ask about depression. If a doctor tries to label you as Alzheimer's disease or dementia on your first visit, find a new doctor.


THIS. My dad died in palliative care a few weeks ago, and when he arrived one of the first things the doctor said to us was "It's dementia, it's very common at end of life and that's what's going on." Except it wasn't. The guy was tired off his ass and either stoned out of his gourd or in a not insignificant amount of pain. When the oxys wore off he made perfect sense.

cherryl taggart: It's just now no one wants that person living in their home, because even with meds, it's a long drawn out form of death.


Also this. Were he a dog we'd have put him down weeks before he died. Waking up long enough to shiat in a bag, describe pain, get a painful injection and pass out again to wake up in four hours and do it all over again is torture for bullshiat morality's sake. "Dying with dignity" my bald, pasty monkey ass.
 
2012-12-21 08:25:23 AM
I hear its amazing when the famous purple worm, in flap jaw space, with the tuning fork, does a raw blink on hirikiri rock! I need scissors! 61!
 
2012-12-21 08:46:48 AM

swingerofbirches: I started Ativan when I was 14 and am still on it at 30 along with Paxil and Seroquel


I think the first thing you need to cut back on is Wikipedia time. It looks like one of your problems is TMI syndrome, seeing as you wrote a six hundred word entry from a minimum of prep. I know grabbing you by the shoulders and yelling "stop worrying about everything" isn't a solution, but I'd suggest getting obsessed about things other than your health and issues that might crop up 30-40 years from now. Maybe LOLcats or model trains or something.
 
2012-12-21 08:56:22 AM
Plain Arrdvark . . . Cool band name.
 
2012-12-21 08:58:00 AM

nicoffeine: robohobo: The baby boomers couldn't be more deserving.

/christmas spirit, and all

My parents are both boomers. I don't think either one of them deserve that. After watching what my grandmother went through, and my mother because of it, I wouldn't wish it on anyone.


THIS. My grandmother is lost to the world at this point, and I'm starting to suspect that my mother is going that way as well. Kinda puts a target on my forehead now that I think about it.
 
2012-12-21 09:30:46 AM

Dinobot: I hear its amazing when the famous purple worm, in flap jaw space, with the tuning fork, does a raw blink on hirikiri rock! I need scissors! 61!


Don't believe anything the Kennedys tell you.

You learn a few things on this bus.
 
2012-12-21 09:42:51 AM
My fathers had 8 siblings, now down to him and sister. He is the youngest at 80. Almost all lived long lives- 80 and 90s. One even made it to 103. The exception was one who "only" made it to 78 and he was the only one who developed any mental disorder- Alzheimer's. Cancer, heart disease etc got the rest but mentally OK.

Kind of hoping to have got my dad's side long lived, good health genes as my mom's side has not done nearly has well.
 
2012-12-21 09:45:27 AM

dervish16108: Turmeric.


except for the metal flakes in Protandim. check out sabnsa's c3 DC. bonus tableting compressibility.
 
2012-12-21 09:50:06 AM

swingerofbirches: And if anyone knows more about anti-cholinergics ..., please share what you know!


i made out with a cactus for six hours straight once?
 
2012-12-21 09:51:39 AM

swingerofbirches: And if anyone knows more about anti-cholinergics and or about phosphatidylserine, please share what you know!


I know they can be unpleasant recreationally,deliriants. With what you said then I'm farked but Alzheimer's already runs in my mom's side of the family so I'm farked no matter what.
 
2012-12-21 09:54:26 AM

swingerofbirches: I recently learned about things called anti-cholingerics. I don't claim to understand it, but from what I've read, certain drugs are anti-cholingeric, and they include things you would think are relatively safe like antacids to things you would assume have worse side effects like psychiatric drugs.

Anyhow, the more of these you take, the more you increase your risk for dementia and Alzheimer's, I believe (fittingly enough, I don't remember if it was both or just one of those two conditions).

I've always assumed I'm screwed when it comes to my brain because I started Ativan when I was 14 and am still on it at 30 along with Paxil and Seroquel, but I never knew that over the counter drugs could be contributing as well, so I've started being careful about those. I've read articles where a doctor will mention that an elderly patient took an antacid and became confused within hours, and there was a direct cause and effect, along with the long-term build-up. I never have had a doctor tell me side effects of any drugs let alone this whole thing about anti-cholinergics.

I am slowly (and I mean slowly, as in making almost no progress) tapering off my drugs, but I also take supplements (fish oil, multivitamin, magnesium, vitamin D3, Cinnulin PF (for my blood sugar)), and I've been researching this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosphatidylserine

I am very cautious of adding anything new to my regimen because things you wouldn't expect can interact with meds, but my psychiatrist actually wants me to add it (although she wants me to add it in prescription form: Vayarin, which is the same substance but contains omega-3s, which I already get from fish oil). There's also Vayacog, which is the same stuff in a higher dose. The only other difference is the target audience (ADHD vs. Alzheimer's). I have neither, but she prescribes it off label for her patients taking benzodiazepines. It's the first and only prescription medical food I've heard of, and it has orphan drug status (no ...


Thats a whole lot of brain maintenance expense and concern.

From a distance you just sound like you enjoy medication.  Which is fine, certainly.  And under a physicians care, certainly would have advantages over just doing it yourself.

I really have to wonder sometimes how people survived all those years before brain meds were invented.
 
2012-12-21 10:23:42 AM

robohobo: The baby boomers couldn't be more deserving.

/christmas spirit, and all


Fark you, honey, we will just wait and see what you leave in your wake when you get 'there'.
 
2012-12-21 10:28:57 AM
"Looming"? Have you checked out the Politics tab?
 
2012-12-21 11:19:49 AM
I'm checking out when my brain ceases to function. When I'm unsure of my mental fitness, I will start sky diving, rock climbing, scuba diving etc. You know, all the stupid stuff no sane person would do.
 
2012-12-21 11:32:44 AM
My Grandma has dementia (92 years old ffs!) It's not as bad as some other stories I have heard but still sad to see. My Mom should be farking sainted for what she has to deal with taking care of her. Constant stress and fighting with her. I go over and "Grandma sit" so my Mom and Step-Dad can get away for a while.
 
2012-12-21 12:50:27 PM

fusillade762: Insatiable Jesus: Worked with a 78 y.o. guy who owned some factories in Mexico. All this guy had ever done was work, and was still going strong with several operations in Mexico. And he would get weird every day in the late afternoon, start not making any kind of sense, doing something again that had been done the day before, firing people for no reason and all sorts of weird crap. But he would remember it the next day and try to undo the damage, so he was aware and finally admitted it openly but said fark you if you think I'm going home at 3, just ignore me, it's my building.

What did he make?


Saddles, electronics, you name it. Neat old guy.
 
2012-12-21 01:05:51 PM
This article is so far behind the curve ...
 
2012-12-21 05:59:26 PM
And there's still no cure for pancakes!!1!!1!
http://www.theonion.com/articles/alzheimers-sufferers-demand-cure-for - pancakes,835/
 
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