Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Buzzfeed)   Weekly Fark food thread: Christmas Dinners. Share your menus, ask your questions, post photos. Bonus for this week only: A special guest chef who is also a farker   (buzzfeed.com) divider line 336
    More: Spiffy, Christmas dinner, threads  
•       •       •

1644 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Dec 2012 at 4:58 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



336 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-12-20 04:32:09 PM  

DesertZephyr: I dunno the proportions of acid to oil for a vinegarette... how would YOU suggest assembly?


Cooking school says 3 part oil to 1 part acid, but geometry doesn't support such a high level of oil, math says you shouldn't be able to emulsify more than 2 parts oil with 1 part acid without your vinaigrette breaking.
 
I personally like to do a 1 to 1 ratio as its lower in calories, and still tastes great.  Just be sure to add your oil to your acid SLOWLY while whisking.  The smaller you can make the droplets of oil in your dressing, the more your tastebuds will taste them, even though you've got less oil than other recipes typically call for.  More info:  http://www.cookwithtom.com/?p=446
 
2012-12-20 04:32:46 PM  

BigBooper: No. The entire Turkey was $4.68. We got the thing for 39 cents a pound. And then got a bunch of stuff free with it. We had to argue with a store manager to use all the coupons together, but the store coupons said they could be used together, and the manufacturers coupon didn't have any restrictions on it. So he didn't argue long. He probably didn't want other shoppers hearing what we were doing.


Well, I'm an asshole.  Great find, and best of luck to you in the coming year.  Hope everything gets better for you.
 
2012-12-20 04:33:05 PM  

mryoop789: Tom, which would you recommend for baking a souffle? Microwave or toaster oven?


Both work.
 
A nuker will give you a denser/chewier souffle, but a toaster oven gives pretty good results.
 
When all else fails, use an Easy Bake.
 
2012-12-20 04:33:31 PM  
Tom,
 
Please help settle an argument. Which is better on steak: ketchup or miracle whip?
 
2012-12-20 04:33:43 PM  

Sapper_Topo: I want to glaze a ham with something other than brown sugar or honey any of you have success with something a little more say... Exotic? Also I have a confession I hate Christmas! But seriously ham glaze GO!


A-1 Sauce. Seriously. Read the ingredients.
 
2012-12-20 04:36:39 PM  

mryoop789: Tom,
 
Please help settle an argument. Which is better on steak: ketchup or miracle whip?

 
Ketchup works well if you're a Godless heathen that probably hasn't showered in 6 months, beats his/her kids and loves listening to Michael Bolton.
 
Mayonnaise is good on a steak if the steak is actually a hamburger.
 
2012-12-20 04:36:46 PM  
Looks like I'll be busting open a frozen dinner (Boston Market, because it's a special occasion) And a big can of Camo Black Xtra 12.2%, plus whatever's on the plate the neighbor might or might not bring.
 
2012-12-20 04:37:29 PM  
Tommy,
I would like to feed my family something a little special and exotic this year. I'm in charge of the salad, and I'm trying to decide between maple leaves and oak leaves. Thoughts?
 
2012-12-20 04:37:42 PM  
www.vegastripping.com

Since everyone is over 21 we've done 24 hours in Vegas for Christmas. Fly in on one redeye and back on another, sleep on the plane. Don't even have to find someone to check on the cats.
 
2012-12-20 04:38:24 PM  
For as long as I can remember, Christmas dinner in my house was and still is Prime Rib and Lobster Tails. It's about the only tradition still alive in my family, the few that are left.
 
2012-12-20 04:38:38 PM  

twoody: aprentic: We make everything from scratch (my wife makes the sauerkraut because the last time I tried it I made 5 gallons of rotten cabbage).

I'd love her recipe.  Homemade fermentations are loads of fun!


Citrate1007: aprentic: coq au vin

Beautiful


It taste great. Plus you get to say coq in polite company with a straight face.
 
2012-12-20 04:38:38 PM  

mryoop789: Tommy,
I would like to feed my family something a little special and exotic this year. I'm in charge of the salad, and I'm trying to decide between maple leaves and oak leaves. Thoughts?


You make joke, but I recently tried a Jerusalem artichoke smoked in oak leaves that was insanely decadent.
 
2012-12-20 04:39:14 PM  

twoody: mryoop789: Tommy,
I would like to feed my family something a little special and exotic this year. I'm in charge of the salad, and I'm trying to decide between maple leaves and oak leaves. Thoughts?

You make joke, but I recently tried a Jerusalem artichoke smoked in oak leaves that was insanely decadent.


Sigh.
 
Okay. I'll get you with the next one. Hmmm.
 
2012-12-20 04:40:50 PM  
My aunt has pica and always requests special dishes. Do you think felt would taste better marinated in something sweet, or something savory? Also, would you pair it with Windex or dish soap?
 
2012-12-20 04:43:04 PM  

mryoop789: My aunt has pica and always requests special dishes. Do you think felt would taste better marinated in something sweet, or something savory? Also, would you pair it with Windex or dish soap?


At least challenge us, A sawdust and crushed wallboard rub is the obvious choice. 

 
2012-12-20 04:43:12 PM  

mryoop789: My aunt has pica and always requests special dishes


Special dishes that are made out of dirt?
 
2012-12-20 04:44:12 PM  
I really do love it she Yoop had nothing going on and she can muck up threads.

/I'm easily entertained
 
2012-12-20 04:44:15 PM  

R.A.Danny: mryoop789: My aunt has pica and always requests special dishes. Do you think felt would taste better marinated in something sweet, or something savory? Also, would you pair it with Windex or dish soap?

At least challenge us, A sawdust and crushed wallboard rub is the obvious choice.


Seriously mryoop789, I expected better from you.
 
/Disgusted teacher stare.
 
2012-12-20 04:46:51 PM  
FINE.
 
This year I'm making my specialty: Beanie Weenie and Mac & Cheese casserole. This year, instead of crushing potato chips and putting shredded cheese on top, I thought I'd fancy it up. Ideas?
 
2012-12-20 04:48:14 PM  

mryoop789: FINE.
 
This year I'm making my specialty: Beanie Weenie and Mac & Cheese casserole. This year, instead of crushing potato chips and putting shredded cheese on top, I thought I'd fancy it up. Ideas?


I'm not sure something like that COULD be improved upon...
 
But if I WERE to offer an opinion, I'd replace the potato chips with corn chips and call it southwestern style.
 
2012-12-20 04:48:25 PM  
Oh, twoody, I have a question: the Spinach Frittata I want to make says I should start it on the stove, then finish it in the oven -- using the same pan. The problem I'm having is that I don't have a pan that will allow me to do this (they all have plastic/meltable handles). Any suggestions?

I look forward to your answer, and thank you in advance.
 
2012-12-20 04:48:32 PM  

namegoeshere: I have a box of butternut squash. I would like to serve some at Christmas dinner. How can I fancy it up?


Here's a thing Mrsnuisance made up a few weeks ago when she had a gigantic butternut laying around:

Peel and cube the squash, and roast it: olive oil, garlic, onions, shallots, rosemary springs, a couple bay leaves, salt and pepper. When it's all caramelized and yummy, remove from heat and let cool. Remove rosemary and bay. Place roasted goodness into blender, add veggie stock, a few dollops of yogurt, a splash or two of milk. Basically you to adjust the liquids to your taste and to reach a smooth, not very runny puree.

Cook a pasta of your choice. Drain, reserving a few cups of pasta water. Pour pasta and puree into warmed serving vessel, adding pasta water a cup at a time and stirring til preferred consistency is achieved and pasta is well-coated. Serve with a strong hard cheese for grating, avoiding rennet, (if you're trying for a true veggie dish).

Super easy, and OmNomNom.
 
2012-12-20 04:48:38 PM  

mryoop789: FINE.

This year I'm making my specialty: Beanie Weenie and Mac & Cheese casserole. This year, instead of crushing potato chips and putting shredded cheese on top, I thought I'd fancy it up. Ideas?


French's Fried Onions. Because nothing says classy holiday meal more than crackin' open a can o' them.
 
2012-12-20 04:48:47 PM  

mryoop789: FINE.
 
This year I'm making my specialty: Beanie Weenie and Mac & Cheese casserole. This year, instead of crushing potato chips and putting shredded cheese on top, I thought I'd fancy it up. Ideas?


The answer is always panko. Plus Ms. Picalips can pretend it's more sawdust and eat at the grownup table instead of the crawlspace.
 
2012-12-20 04:49:13 PM  
Made this turducken a few years ago. Going to do it again this year.

i106.photobucket.com
 
2012-12-20 04:49:15 PM  
I have to cook a 20 lb turkey to bring to my Mom's, she's making the prime rib. I like the stuffed prime rib recipe link, it looks fab.
 
2012-12-20 04:49:16 PM  

pute kisses like a man: gravelox (literally, dead fish).


Sorry, but gravad lax literally means buried salmon. Before fridges were invented, the scandinavians used to bury the fish with salt, dill and sugar in the cool soil until it was dried and lightly fermented. Todays commercial produced gravelox: Meh.

/Not swedish...
//Not a chef...
///...but i farkin' love everything fishy
 
2012-12-20 04:49:46 PM  

GreatGlavinsGhost: Oh, twoody, I have a question: the Spinach Frittata I want to make says I should start it on the stove, then finish it in the oven -- using the same pan. The problem I'm having is that I don't have a pan that will allow me to do this (they all have plastic/meltable handles). Any suggestions?

I look forward to your answer, and thank you in advance.


Keep a cast iron something around for these times.

I cook on cast iron almost exclusively, but that's just me.
 
2012-12-20 04:49:50 PM  

soosh: Sorry things are rough for you, <b>BigBooper</b>. Hope things improve.


Thank you. It's been a rough farking year. Started off with my infant daughter being seriously ill. Because of that, my wife left her job to care for her. Then this summer, I hurt my self at work, and end up in the hospital for a month with a spinal cord injury. First surgery got farked up, and I ended up partially paralyzed. The good news is that my daughter is fully recovered, and the second surgery was a success, and I'm starting to be able to walk again. The doctors expect that I'll eventually make a full recovery. It's going to suck for the next 12-18 months of P.T. torture, but in the end it will be worth it.
 
2012-12-20 04:50:25 PM  

ferretman: shakenasababy: ferretman: Want to make but don't have a deep fryer:

[randomcravings.files.wordpress.com image 850x637]

Oooh what is that? I have a deep frier. I'll make some and fax it to you.

correct spelling: spiedini alla romana


That looks amaaazing. But how do you keep the cheese from melting out? This could get messy in a deep frier. The anchovy caper sauce is making my mouth water.
 
2012-12-20 04:50:28 PM  

Deucednuisance: namegoeshere: I have a box of butternut squash. I would like to serve some at Christmas dinner. How can I fancy it up?

Here's a thing Mrsnuisance made up a few weeks ago when she had a gigantic butternut laying around:

Peel and cube the squash, and roast it: olive oil, garlic, onions, shallots, rosemary springs, a couple bay leaves, salt and pepper. When it's all caramelized and yummy, remove from heat and let cool. Remove rosemary and bay. Place roasted goodness into blender, add veggie stock, a few dollops of yogurt, a splash or two of milk. Basically you to adjust the liquids to your taste and to reach a smooth, not very runny puree.

Cook a pasta of your choice. Drain, reserving a few cups of pasta water. Pour pasta and puree into warmed serving vessel, adding pasta water a cup at a time and stirring til preferred consistency is achieved and pasta is well-coated. Serve with a strong hard cheese for grating, avoiding rennet, (if you're trying for a true veggie dish).

Super easy, and OmNomNom.


Ooh, that sounds good.
 
2012-12-20 04:50:48 PM  

Shostie: Hi, twoody,
 
I was just wondering how long it would take to cook a person, like, say, kwame.
 
You see, it's all part of this elaborate revenge fantasy. I plan to present the cooked kwame to my husband and say, "try the cock, Albert. It's a delicacy, and you know where it's been," as a sort of epic denouement and an homage to a cult movie that no one's seen but me.
 
Thanks,
 
Shostie


I hope your husband likes dark meat.
 
2012-12-20 04:51:03 PM  
Okay, okay. I'll stop disrupting your thread (finally).
 
And if I have legitimate questions, I know where to go. I've never tried a recipe of yours that didn't rock.
 
2012-12-20 04:51:23 PM  
Don't forget the Jell-o salad!
 
dubsism.files.wordpress.com
 
delicious-cooks.com
 
www.bourbonandboots.com
 
2012-12-20 04:51:27 PM  

GreatGlavinsGhost: Oh, twoody, I have a question: the Spinach Frittata I want to make says I should start it on the stove, then finish it in the oven -- using the same pan. The problem I'm having is that I don't have a pan that will allow me to do this (they all have plastic/meltable handles). Any suggestions?

I look forward to your answer, and thank you in advance.


The purpose of putting the frittata in the oven is to get the cheese all melty.  If I didn't have a pan capable of doing that, I'd TRY to flip the frittata in the pan, and melt/brown the cheese upside down.  An easy way to do this is to transfer the near cooked frittata to a plate, put the hot pan over the top of the frittata, and then invert the plate/pan.  Then when it's time to serve, put the lid on top of the pan, and flip the frittata back over.
 
I should warn you, this only works in a nonstick pan.
 
2012-12-20 04:51:52 PM  

shakenasababy: Hello twoody!

I have a question. I bought a deep frier for Friendsgiving and served up some great fried turkey. I thought I'd treat my parents this Christmas to a fried turkey, but maybe you have other suggestions for what I can deep fry?


Fritters. Before you fry the bird.
 
2012-12-20 04:51:59 PM  
This morning at the shelter some people gave out $5 certificates for McD's.
So I got that going for me.
 
2012-12-20 04:52:36 PM  

mryoop789: Okay, okay. I'll stop disrupting your thread (finally).
 
And if I have legitimate questions, I know where to go. I've never tried a recipe of yours that didn't rock.


Awww, you were the second best part
 
2012-12-20 04:53:10 PM  

bim1154: Made this turducken a few years ago. Going to do it again this year.


Nice work!  Do you debone your own birds?
 
2012-12-20 04:53:19 PM  
Hey twoody:
I recently saw you on Huffington Post with Giada De Laguardia. How did you actually focus your words on food and not on boobs?
Cuz. Ya know.
BOOBS.
Love, Ras
 
2012-12-20 04:53:20 PM  

NickelP: I recently acquired an induction cooker and want to try to do a poor mans sous vide on it. I have a vacume sealer. Any tips/trips/easy recipes that would work decently with that setup?


My friend has a poor man's sous vide.  He made corned beef, and it was the best. thing. ever.
 
I don't have experience or a recipie, sorry.  Just wanted to throw the idea out there.
 
/And I generally don't like corned beef.
 
2012-12-20 04:53:20 PM  

Eutamias21: namegoeshere: I have a box of butternut squash. I would like to serve some at Christmas dinner. How can I fancy it up? Without little marshmallows. Because no.

My mom makes this and it's one of my favorite things on the planet:

Squash Souffle

1 10 oz pkg frozen squash
1 stick butter
½ cup sugar (this is on the sweet side, so reduce according to taste)
½ cup flour
2 cups milk (I use 1 milk and 1 cream)
3 eggs (beaten and added one at a time)

I recommend buying a soufflé dish if you don't have one.  It is a flat bottomed, circular shaped 'pan' with high sides.  Grease the sides with dab of butter and then flour very lightly.
Cook the squash with butter on low heat.  Remove from the stove.  Add ½ cup sugar and ½ cup flour.  Add 3 eggs, one at a time.  Add the milk and cream, stirring, then cinnamon
and a dash of nutmeg.  Bake at 350 for 1 to 1½ hours.


This sounds very yummy, too. It's a big box - I've got squeesh enough to try lots of new things. Yeay!
 
2012-12-20 04:54:04 PM  
Not entirely sure what all our Christmas dinner menu's going to be, but I know it will include a plethora of homemade raviolis (thanks to an Italian mother-in-law) and my favorite Christmas dessert, pink peppermint pie.
 
2012-12-20 04:54:18 PM  

Ras-Algethi: Hey twoody:
I recently saw you on Huffington Post with Giada De Laguardia. How did you actually focus your words on food and not on boobs?
Cuz. Ya know.
BOOBS.
Love, Ras


It wasn't easy.
 
P.S.  I think Giada and I might still be in a Twitter fight, but I'm not sure.
 
2012-12-20 04:54:28 PM  
I want to make lemon curd and give it out as gifts with a recipe for something to use it in.

A. I've planned to use Alton Brown's recipe since it was the first one in a search and I'm too lazy to research to find out which recipe is actually the best. Good idea?

B. Do you have a recipe to suggest I give with the lemon curd?
 
2012-12-20 04:55:02 PM  

mryoop789: Okay, okay. I'll stop disrupting your thread (finally).

And if I have legitimate questions, I know where to go. I've never tried a recipe of yours that didn't rock.


Love you Yoopie!!! 
 
/we go WAAAYYYYYY back.
 
2012-12-20 04:55:07 PM  

twoody: aprentic: We make everything from scratch (my wife makes the sauerkraut because the last time I tried it I made 5 gallons of rotten cabbage).

I'd love her recipe.  Homemade fermentations are loads of fun!


Keep everything really really clean. I'm pretty sure I was too cavalier about that with my rotten cabbage recipe.

Wash cabbage and take off the nasty outer leaves.
Cut out the stem and chop the rest of it into thin slivers (they looked like they were about 1 or 2 mm across).
Put them in a clean container.
Add about 1 tbl of salt per lb of cabbage (this is from memory I'll check with Ms. aprentic and update if I'm wrong).
It has to be sea salt or some other salt with nothing added or it can inhibit the fermentation process.
Mix it up and squish the whole thing down (with really clean hands).
Cover it and let it sit for a while. In a day or so there should be enough water to cover the cabbage. If not add some brine or vinegar top it off.
Let it sit in a cool place for a while (ready in about a week but it gets better with age).
The cabbage has to be completely submerged in the liquid or it will go bad. Cover it to keep junk out but don't use a tight fitting lid or it will explode (an air lock works if you're using a (clean) beer making bucket)

I'll run this by Ms. aprentic and if anything is wrong I'll post an update.
 
2012-12-20 04:55:13 PM  

twoody: GreatGlavinsGhost: Oh, twoody, I have a question: the Spinach Frittata I want to make says I should start it on the stove, then finish it in the oven -- using the same pan. The problem I'm having is that I don't have a pan that will allow me to do this (they all have plastic/meltable handles). Any suggestions?

I look forward to your answer, and thank you in advance.

The purpose of putting the frittata in the oven is to get the cheese all melty.  If I didn't have a pan capable of doing that, I'd TRY to flip the frittata in the pan, and melt/brown the cheese upside down.  An easy way to do this is to transfer the near cooked frittata to a plate, put the hot pan over the top of the frittata, and then invert the plate/pan.  Then when it's time to serve, put the lid on top of the pan, and flip the frittata back over.

I should warn you, this only works in a nonstick pan.


Okay, I'll try that. Thank you.
 
2012-12-20 04:56:12 PM  

Occasionally rational: I want to make lemon curd and give it out as gifts with a recipe for something to use it in.

A. I've planned to use Alton Brown's recipe since it was the first one in a search and I'm too lazy to research to find out which recipe is actually the best. Good idea?

B. Do you have a recipe to suggest I give with the lemon curd?


It's pretty simple to make, and A.B.'s recipe is pretty solid.  Just be sure to add your hot liquid to your eggs, and NOT your eggs to your hot liquid.  One way makes a great curd, the other way makes lemon egg drop soup.
 
2012-12-20 04:56:40 PM  

zenobia: Sapper_Topo: I want to glaze a ham with something other than brown sugar or honey any of you have success with something a little more say... Exotic? Also I have a confession I hate Christmas! But seriously ham glaze GO!

A-1 Sauce. Seriously. Read the ingredients.


That. Might. Actually. Work!
 
Displayed 50 of 336 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report