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(Telegraph)   Every two weeks the Airbus A380, lonely and in pieces, roams the streets of rural France looking for love, and finds it from the locals   (telegraph.co.uk) divider line 3
    More: Interesting, Airbus A380, regional airport, Franco-German, break even point, Toulouse, production rate, emerging economies  
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9124 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Dec 2012 at 7:22 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-20 09:23:32 PM
1 votes:

Erik_Emune: TanHamster: If it's not Boeing, I'm not going. Seriously.

American Airlines Flight 587 = Airbus vertical stabilizer snapped off

Air France Flight 447 = dunno, basically an Airbus fell apart during cruise regime

Then let me enlighten you. AF447 was caused by a pilot misreading the situation, not being trained in high-speed stall conditions and consistently providing the wrong control input. (In this case, nose-up.) The airplane was in perfect, flyable condition and obediently followed the commands from its human masters, right into the sea. If the PF had let go of the controls 30 seconds into the event, you would have never heard of AF447.

AA587 - a pilot overcompensating for wake turbulence, applying full rudder first to one side, then to another, stressing the stabilizer way beyond the design (and classification) envelope. This is not how you're supposed to fly heavy aircraft. (Pilots have since complained that the rudder pedals are too sensitive. Could be. But no one not from Boeing have insisted that the vertical stabilizer is too weak.)

It does strike me as funny that people tend to complain about Airbus' over-reliance on computers yet also tend to cite accidents that are due to human error.


We've all read the NTSB reports, same as you. We just draw different conclusions. As a pilot myself, I know that a sturdy airplane will not disintegrate when the control surfaces are fully deflected while airspeed is less than VNE. This apparently is not true of Airbus aircraft -- see exhibit AA 587.

Yeah, you're right, AF 447 was pilot error. An Airbus cruising along at top speed in the upper atmosphere suddenly has complete ADC (air data computer) failure, causing autopilot disconnect at an altitude and speed where drag divergence is approximately equal to stall speed. That's not a shiatty airplane at all -- that's pilot incompetence. You're an idiot.
2012-12-20 08:03:12 PM
1 votes:

TanHamster: If it's not Boeing, I'm not going. Seriously.

American Airlines Flight 587 = Airbus vertical stabilizer snapped off

Air France Flight 447 = dunno, basically an Airbus fell apart during cruise regime

Boeing & Bombardier make solid airplanes.


Airbus 320 is everywhere, so maybe you'll just stay at home then.

---

Anyways:

upload.wikimedia.org

I looked it up. Spain makes the tail and belly sections.
2012-12-20 07:44:46 PM
1 votes:

wildcardjack: Okay, who's the farker that thought it would be a good idea to drive half finished A380's through the French countryside on a regular basis was a good plan?

I wonder what the accounting for that subtly communist "company" looks like.


I've always wondered about that production model myself. There is no way that it is, in any way, efficient to build the fuselage in one place, the wings in another, and join them together somewhere else. I'm guessing each of the Airbus governments wanted a piece of the work, and this is what they came up with.
 
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