If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(SeattlePI)   Weekend at Kim Jong Illie's   (seattlepi.com) divider line 39
    More: Cool  
•       •       •

10830 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Dec 2012 at 4:23 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



39 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2012-12-18 02:34:19 PM  
(Kim Jong) Now, if I'd known
They'd line up just to see him (Funky Kim)
I'd trade in all my money
And bought me a museum (Kim Jong)
 
2012-12-18 04:26:53 PM  
I loved that movie ;)
 
2012-12-18 04:30:52 PM  
They even make them fat in statue form. That's great!
 
2012-12-18 04:32:11 PM  
Ewwww....
 
2012-12-18 04:38:29 PM  
Buried with his donkey.
Leader of Hong Kong-ey
 
2012-12-18 04:41:21 PM  
I dunno about this, but a couple friends of mine, both medical doctors, went to visit Lenin's tomb years ago. They both said "I'm not sure what they claim to have preserved him with, but that sure as hell isn't an actual human body." I'd be betting the same here.
 
2012-12-18 04:42:32 PM  
You be Kim Jong illin'!
 
2012-12-18 04:45:06 PM  
Macbook Pro? Why do we still let Best Korea have nice things?
 
2012-12-18 04:47:10 PM  
It's a "speed-suit".
 
2012-12-18 04:47:22 PM  

rangerdavid: Macbook Pro? Why do we still let Best Korea have nice things?


Do they make them in China?
 
2012-12-18 04:49:16 PM  
KIm Jong Illin' would be a great rapper name.
 
2012-12-18 04:49:18 PM  

cgraves67: rangerdavid: Macbook Pro? Why do we still let Best Korea have nice things?

Do they make them in China?


Yes, using Best Korean refuge labor. Everything is circular. Feel the flow.
 
2012-12-18 04:51:31 PM  
www.newscientist.com

We should fly C5-As filled with confetti with this single image printed on each side, and drop over the whole country.
 
2012-12-18 04:58:42 PM  
ww4.hdnux.com

I'm curious how they built these. Given their size, I don't think it's possible they'd be cast of bronze, nor does it have a proper patina, that's a faux-bronze finish.

You wouldn't make a concrete casting that big, either.
The hanging clothing generally cannot be sculpted either. Well it's impractical to even get a piece of marble or whatever that big to begin with, and if you did, you'd leave it marble.

To be quite honest, they ARE very accurate. So much so I'd say they might have begun as a small clay sculpture by a craftsman, 3D scanned, and 3D printed. But out of WHAT, I don't know. There are no visible seams as evidence of a paneled construction.

It could be repoussé copper over a steel skeleton like the Statue of Liberty, but that was a major one-off technologically. I don't know if you'd even be able to buy artists internationally to do this sort of work. And that doesn't look like real copper, unless it's just that they don't share the aesthetics of patina or antiquing and just polished it and sealed it.
 
2012-12-18 04:59:17 PM  
was anyone else waiting or hoping to see this?
i.imgur.com
 
2012-12-18 05:03:56 PM  

Oznog: I'm curious how they built these. Given their size, I don't think it's possible they'd be cast of bronze, nor does it have a proper patina, that's a faux-bronze finish.

You wouldn't make a concrete casting that big, either.
The hanging clothing generally cannot be sculpted either. Well it's impractical to even get a piece of marble or whatever that big to begin with, and if you did, you'd leave it marble.

To be quite honest, they ARE very accurate. So much so I'd say they might have begun as a small clay sculpture by a craftsman, 3D scanned, and 3D printed. But out of WHAT, I don't know. There are no visible seams as evidence of a paneled construction.

It could be repoussé copper over a steel skeleton like the Statue of Liberty, but that was a major one-off technologically. I don't know if you'd even be able to buy artists internationally to do this sort of work. And that doesn't look like real copper, unless it's just that they don't share the aesthetics of patina or antiquing and just polished it and sealed it.


I'd say it's probably real. If you're going to fake a statuary metal, why not just go all the way and fake gold? I imagine it's partially cast and partially stamped sheets held together with a steel frame with soldered joints.
 
2012-12-18 05:05:05 PM  
www.greendalecommunitycollege.com
 
2012-12-18 05:09:53 PM  
A brief gallery of the jubilant populace:

images.onset.freedom.com
m.toledoblade.com
www.comtourist.com
 
2012-12-18 05:15:23 PM  
ww4.hdnux.com
 
2012-12-18 05:23:01 PM  
North Korean flag officer military hats are silly and look like they belong on the head of a boss in Bad Dudes. That is all.

/can't be an obscure game
 
2012-12-18 05:23:55 PM  

cgraves67: Oznog: I'm curious how they built these. Given their size, I don't think it's possible they'd be cast of bronze, nor does it have a proper patina, that's a faux-bronze finish.

You wouldn't make a concrete casting that big, either.
The hanging clothing generally cannot be sculpted either. Well it's impractical to even get a piece of marble or whatever that big to begin with, and if you did, you'd leave it marble.

To be quite honest, they ARE very accurate. So much so I'd say they might have begun as a small clay sculpture by a craftsman, 3D scanned, and 3D printed. But out of WHAT, I don't know. There are no visible seams as evidence of a paneled construction.

It could be repoussé copper over a steel skeleton like the Statue of Liberty, but that was a major one-off technologically. I don't know if you'd even be able to buy artists internationally to do this sort of work. And that doesn't look like real copper, unless it's just that they don't share the aesthetics of patina or antiquing and just polished it and sealed it.

I'd say it's probably real. If you're going to fake a statuary metal, why not just go all the way and fake gold? I imagine it's partially cast and partially stamped sheets held together with a steel frame with soldered joints.


i.dailymail.co.uk

Another picture, better showing the monstrous scale here.

Soldering/brazing isn't all that practical on this scale. The skill required to weld organic surfaces like this and leave no visible seam would be really tricky!
The cost of real bronze would be extravagant, and NK is still cash-strapped. The weight of it would be technically difficult to support, esp the hanging clothing and outstretched arm. The thing is, if you supported it with a steel skeleton, there would HAVE to be moving joints due to thermal expansion issues. There's no joints. Even the Statue of Liberty has panel joints.

I looked it up, all that is known is they were made by the North Korean Mansudae Art Studio. They were constructed in secret with no documentation.

They might be a fiberglass-and-foam-over-steel-skeleton like the infamous "Touchdown Jesus" that got struck by lightning and burned down. In fact that seems pretty likely to me.

Rough steel framework, filled in with styrofoam or expanding foam and sculpted, faced with fiberglass and epoxy cloth which also composes the hanging clothing, and the "bronze pigment" added to a top gelcoat.
 
2012-12-18 05:24:16 PM  

cgraves67: Oznog: I'm curious how they built these. Given their size, I don't think it's possible they'd be cast of bronze, nor does it have a proper patina, that's a faux-bronze finish.

You wouldn't make a concrete casting that big, either.
The hanging clothing generally cannot be sculpted either. Well it's impractical to even get a piece of marble or whatever that big to begin with, and if you did, you'd leave it marble.

To be quite honest, they ARE very accurate. So much so I'd say they might have begun as a small clay sculpture by a craftsman, 3D scanned, and 3D printed. But out of WHAT, I don't know. There are no visible seams as evidence of a paneled construction.

It could be repoussé copper over a steel skeleton like the Statue of Liberty, but that was a major one-off technologically. I don't know if you'd even be able to buy artists internationally to do this sort of work. And that doesn't look like real copper, unless it's just that they don't share the aesthetics of patina or antiquing and just polished it and sealed it.

I'd say it's probably real. If you're going to fake a statuary metal, why not just go all the way and fake gold? I imagine it's partially cast and partially stamped sheets held together with a steel frame with soldered joints.


Here's a daylight picture (click to embiggen):
upload.wikimedia.org

Have we considered the possibility that they're CGI?
 
2012-12-18 05:37:24 PM  
I wouldn't have clapped. Swear to fark, I do
 
2012-12-18 05:37:56 PM  
47 photo slide show and not one of an embalmed, room temperature Kim Jong Il? I feel cheated.
 
2012-12-18 05:38:04 PM  
I thought he was Kim Jong DEAD?
 
2012-12-18 06:34:35 PM  

buckler: I dunno about this, but a couple friends of mine, both medical doctors, went to visit Lenin's tomb years ago. They both said "I'm not sure what they claim to have preserved him with, but that sure as hell isn't an actual human body." I'd be betting the same here.


Was Lenin even human when he was alive?
 
2012-12-18 06:38:26 PM  

Oznog: I looked it up, all that is known is they were made by the North Korean Mansudae Art Studio. They were constructed in secret with no documentation.


I'm fairly certain their feet are made of clay
 
2012-12-18 06:56:10 PM  
Riddle me thee: Why the fark does so much of the world even TOLERATE those North Korean goons?!
 
2012-12-18 06:58:58 PM  

MelGoesOnTour: Riddle me thee: Why the fark does so much of the world even TOLERATE those North Korean goons?!


Because all they do is build stupid statues and fire shiatty rockets into space?
 
2012-12-18 07:05:20 PM  

atomicmask: MelGoesOnTour: Riddle me thee: Why the fark does so much of the world even TOLERATE those North Korean goons?!

Because all they do is build stupid statues and fire shiatty rockets into space?


Yeah. They have no real influence. Their sabre-rattling is laughable, and they take their food rations from the rest of the world with the arrogance that proclaims it's all "tribute" to them. They're weak idiots.
 
2012-12-18 07:08:22 PM  

MelGoesOnTour: Riddle me thee: Why the fark does so much of the world even TOLERATE those North Korean goons?!


Because as horrible as they are, they at least keep their citizenry contained within their borders. If the DPRK government were toppled, you'd see a massive influx of starving North Korean refugees into both China and South Korea, who would be completely overwhelmed. It's a shiatty situation with no easy solutions.
 
2012-12-18 07:22:40 PM  

Shenanigans!: MelGoesOnTour: Riddle me thee: Why the fark does so much of the world even TOLERATE those North Korean goons?!

Because as horrible as they are, they at least keep their citizenry contained within their borders. If the DPRK government were toppled, you'd see a massive influx of starving North Korean refugees into both China and South Korea, who would be completely overwhelmed. It's a shiatty situation with no easy solutions.


I suspect if that happened both China and SK would secure their borders (as they already have) and send in a lot of aid in the form of food.
 
2012-12-18 07:41:53 PM  
Not to worry Best Korea.
The Dear Leader has been reborn!!

i216.photobucket.com
 
2012-12-18 08:41:54 PM  

Oznog: Soldering/brazing isn't all that practical on this scale. The skill required to weld organic surfaces like this and leave no visible seam would be really tricky!
The cost of real bronze would be extravagant, and NK is still cash-strapped. The weight of it would be technically difficult to support, esp the hanging clothing and outstretched arm. The thing is, if you supported it with a steel skeleton, there would HAVE to be moving joints due to thermal expansion issues. There's no joints. Even the Statue of Liberty has panel joints.

I looked it up, all that is known is they were made by the North Korean Mansudae Art Studio. They were constructed in secret with no documentation.

They might be a fiberglass-and-foam-over-steel-skeleton like the infamous "Touchdown Jesus" that got struck by lightning and burned down. In fact that seems pretty likely to me. 


Only problem with that: why would you run the risk, however tiny, that they might actually get hit by lightning and catch on fire? These people are crazy to begin with and I can't see that ending well under any circumstances.
 
 
2012-12-18 09:26:25 PM  
Now we need a picture of Kim Jong Il looking at his dead self...
 
2012-12-18 10:59:03 PM  

pizen: cgraves67: Oznog: I'm curious how they built these. Given their size, I don't think it's possible they'd be cast of bronze, nor does it have a proper patina, that's a faux-bronze finish.

You wouldn't make a concrete casting that big, either.
The hanging clothing generally cannot be sculpted either. Well it's impractical to even get a piece of marble or whatever that big to begin with, and if you did, you'd leave it marble.

To be quite honest, they ARE very accurate. So much so I'd say they might have begun as a small clay sculpture by a craftsman, 3D scanned, and 3D printed. But out of WHAT, I don't know. There are no visible seams as evidence of a paneled construction.

It could be repoussé copper over a steel skeleton like the Statue of Liberty, but that was a major one-off technologically. I don't know if you'd even be able to buy artists internationally to do this sort of work. And that doesn't look like real copper, unless it's just that they don't share the aesthetics of patina or antiquing and just polished it and sealed it.

I'd say it's probably real. If you're going to fake a statuary metal, why not just go all the way and fake gold? I imagine it's partially cast and partially stamped sheets held together with a steel frame with soldered joints.

Here's a daylight picture (click to embiggen):
[upload.wikimedia.org image 640x478]

Have we considered the possibility that they're CGI?


The head of the left statue seems to have moved between shots...

i1281.photobucket.com

i1281.photobucket.com
 
2012-12-18 11:30:13 PM  
i49.tinypic.com
 
2012-12-19 12:49:17 AM  

kg2095: pizen: cgraves67: Oznog: I'm curious how they built these. Given their size, I don't think it's possible they'd be cast of bronze, nor does it have a proper patina, that's a faux-bronze finish.

You wouldn't make a concrete casting that big, either.
The hanging clothing generally cannot be sculpted either. Well it's impractical to even get a piece of marble or whatever that big to begin with, and if you did, you'd leave it marble.

To be quite honest, they ARE very accurate. So much so I'd say they might have begun as a small clay sculpture by a craftsman, 3D scanned, and 3D printed. But out of WHAT, I don't know. There are no visible seams as evidence of a paneled construction.

It could be repoussé copper over a steel skeleton like the Statue of Liberty, but that was a major one-off technologically. I don't know if you'd even be able to buy artists internationally to do this sort of work. And that doesn't look like real copper, unless it's just that they don't share the aesthetics of patina or antiquing and just polished it and sealed it.

I'd say it's probably real. If you're going to fake a statuary metal, why not just go all the way and fake gold? I imagine it's partially cast and partially stamped sheets held together with a steel frame with soldered joints.

Here's a daylight picture (click to embiggen):
[upload.wikimedia.org image 640x478]

Have we considered the possibility that they're CGI?

The head of the left statue seems to have moved between shots...

[i1281.photobucket.com image 634x482]

[i1281.photobucket.com image 640x478]


It'd appear that the photos are taken at two different angles though and we're being fooled by perspective photography.

If you look at the background and closeness of the back image, you can see that the arm of Kim Jong Sung matches up with the weird vent-like things and general location of the mountains closest to the coat tails of both "dear" leaders are in line with where they should be.

Judging by the sun, we're looking at the first photo at noon or close to it and the other photo was taken in the afternoon, placing the sun to the west - which will affect one's perspective slightly as well.

One photo was taken at a completely different angle and distance from another will screw with your brain.

Fark it, I've thought too much into this, good gravy.
 
2012-12-19 03:10:49 AM  

Happy Hours: buckler: I dunno about this, but a couple friends of mine, both medical doctors, went to visit Lenin's tomb years ago. They both said "I'm not sure what they claim to have preserved him with, but that sure as hell isn't an actual human body." I'd be betting the same here.

 
Was Lenin even human when he was alive?
 
 
Back in the 1980s it was rumored that Lenin's corpse was decaying alarmingly fast but nobody could figure out how to stop it, and the dilemma was that just opening the hermetically-sealed glass case to examine it would accelerate the decay.  The joke in Moscow at that time was that once a year Lenin's Tomb would close so that "embalming experts" could "check the body," and at the same time, "all the candles in Moscow would mysteriously disappear."
 
If indeed the body is still on display in 2012 and it's not a wax replica but the actual corpse, then I would really like to know how they solved the problem.
 
http://www.moscow.info/red-square/lenin-mausoleum.aspx
 
My little css is that when I went to visit Lenin's Tomb, the lines were very long.  You had to wait for hours.  This was back when it was the Soviet Union.  So I got there early in the morning, when it was cold (it was summer, but early in the morning, Moscow is cold even in summer).  As the morning got on and the sun rose, I took off my jacket.  When I got close to the tomb and it was almost my turn to go inside, the Red Army guards outside stopped me and spoke to me --- in Russian, which I did not speak.  One of them was gesticulating at me with his automatic rifle.  To be fair, he wasn't really pointing it at me, but it was a little scary.  Luckily, someone fluent in both Russian and English explained to me that all he wanted was for me to put my jacket back on as a show of respect.  
 
But I can honestly say that I was stopped by the Soviet Army once, and with only slight exaggeration I can claim a Red Army soldier pointed an automatic weapon at me once.
 
Displayed 39 of 39 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report