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(Albuquerque Journal)   New Mexico highway "safety corridors" explained: They exist because they are mandated to exist, the DOT has no idea if they work, and police don't enforce them   (abqjournal.com) divider line 37
    More: PSA, New Mexico, safety corridors, Albuquerque Police Department, highways, Bernalillo County, Tony Abbo  
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11445 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Dec 2012 at 10:49 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-17 10:51:56 AM  
Anybody else just get a login page?
 
2012-12-17 10:53:00 AM  
They want you to answer a question before you get to read the article. Too much work. Would require me to think.
FTFA
 
2012-12-17 10:53:43 AM  
I meant Fark TFA
 
2012-12-17 10:53:49 AM  
Hit a paywall..
 
2012-12-17 10:56:28 AM  
It's not a paywall. They want to ask you some marketting oriented questions.

Article sum up:
The speed limit is lower on a particular stretch of highway due to a statistically high accident rate.
 
2012-12-17 10:57:15 AM  
Curvy I-25 Means Lower Speed Limits
By D'Val Westphal / Of the Journal on Mon, Dec 17, 2012 Tweet
[Print-Friendly Version]
[Email This Story] view comments

THAT SAFETY CORRIDOR SEEMS MIGHTY UNSAFE: So emails Morton Dann, who asks "why is that stretch of southbound Interstate 25 just after entering from westbound Interstate 40 called the 'safety corridor'?"

"The speed limit is 55 mph starting shortly after entering and ending just before the exit for the Sunport (Gibson Boulevard). Most drivers are going 65, 70, 80 or more, day and night. There is no police presence I have seen in the past six-plus years since I moved to Albuquerque. I have tried to drive at 55, but I don't feel safe due to the tailgating, flashing lights, finger signals, etc. I don't see much difference between that stretch of road and the rest of either of the interstates and think a 65 mph limit would be just as appropriate. Any comment?"

The New Mexico Department of Transportation designates safety corridors to address high accident rates. NMDOT District 3′s Tony Abbo explains that "back in 2004/2005, we were mandated to have two safety corridors in each district. Since then, we did improvements to Interstate 40 so we did not see a need to keep that one (from Tramway east to the county line) in place. As for I-25, our district never got any data from planning to indicate that accidents went up, came down or stayed the same (on the stretch from Lomas to Los Lunas). We will follow-up with them to see if keeping the safety corridor designation is appropriate."

Regarding enforcement, Albuquerque Police Department officer Tasia Martinez has said "citizens with traffic concerns in an area can call 242-COPS for immediate assistance or file a periodic watch request at their local substation." And Abbo says the area could be problematic for patrols because "the shoulders are narrow in the area and APD may not feel safe giving citations in this area."

Regarding the 55 mph speed limit vs. 65 mph, Abbo says "the roadway geometrics necessitate the posted speed through this area." Back in 2005, he explained "there are places such as I-25 by the Lead and Coal interchange where excessive speed has led to some accidents. These accidents were as a result of the drivers' failure to negotiate the curves along I-25 safely."

He added, "Safety is our number one goal. ... The expected outcome (of the safety corridors) is for people to slow down and adhere to the posted speed limit, which in turn would help in reducing the number and severity of accidents."

BAD CAMERA KILLED EUBANK ARROW: Penny Jones asked via email last month "why has the left-turn arrow from west Paseo to south Eubank been turned off, now that Eubank is closed until January? Not good."

And not planned. Robert Baker, Bernalillo County's signs and signals guru, says the arrow "was turned off (Nov. 2) because we ha(d) a bad camera."

Crews were in the process of replacing it the next week and it was "turned back on shortly. I apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused."

THE HANDICAPPED PLACARD LAW APPLIES TO TEMPS, TOO: After a recent column pointed out state law allows drivers to get two of these parking placards for convenience, Richard Nemitz pointed out via email that statute 66-3-16(C) refers to "permanent limited mobility. What about temporary limited mobility? My wife has had the need for a temporary placard two times due to surgery. Does this ordinance take into account temporary placards?"

Taxation and Revenue spokesman S.U. Mahesh says yes, "this also applies to temp placards."
 
2012-12-17 10:57:38 AM  
Safety corridors are designated portions of routes that have higher than normal amounts of crashes. States get extra funds to try and improve safety, whether that's through more signs, speed enforcement, or geometric improvements. After reading TFA though I'm not sure what NMDOT has done in this particular safety corridor to improve safety other than to lower the speed limit.
 
2012-12-17 10:59:20 AM  
Sounds like Cass Corridor.
 
2012-12-17 11:00:08 AM  
I got in without a login. I must be spezial.

"Lead and Coal interchange..."

So THAT'S where they interchange lead and coal. Knew it had to be somewhere remote, seeing how toxic they are....
 
2012-12-17 11:06:59 AM  
D'Val Westphal sure is a freakin busy body.
 
2012-12-17 11:12:10 AM  
As an Albuquerque resident, I don't have a problem with the safety corridor. It's only a few miles long from the Big I (I-25/I-40 interchange) south to Gibson/Sunport Blvd. Unless there's a buttload of people trying to get off at Avenida Cesar Chavez to get to a Lobo game, it's rarely a problem and really doesn't negatively impact travel through the area. I can still get from my apartment near Rio Rancho all the way to the Sunport in 15-20 minutes unless there's a crash on I-25. This article is a total non-story.
 
2012-12-17 11:19:48 AM  

Bendal: Safety corridors are designated portions of routes that have higher than normal amounts of crashes. States get extra funds to try and improve safety, whether that's through more signs, speed enforcement, or geometric improvements. After reading TFA though I'm not sure what NMDOT has done in this particular safety corridor to improve safety other than to lower the speed limit.


I think the point is that signs that say "safety corridor" do not, in fact, make things safer. They signs are literally just pointing out danger by claiming things are safer.

When I was in middle school, they would put up "drug free school zone" signs at every school that had a drug problem. It's how we knew where to get our drugs.
 
2012-12-17 11:21:39 AM  
I used to be on the "Manzano Highway Patroll" Which meant keeping terrorists out of the Manzano WSA, back in the '70s. I'd get 3 days off after working 6 straight, hop on a motorcycle and get the hell out of ALBQ. Lots of NM is nice. ALBQ is and always was a hellhole.
/Played on stage at the free jazz concert at the KIMO.
//Rode with Maxie Anderson in a balloon.
///Got laid at the Jemez hotsprings.
So it wasn't all bad.
 
2012-12-17 11:26:29 AM  
The safety corridors in my area are signs asking people to turn their headlights on. That is it.
 
2012-12-17 11:30:21 AM  
Increases the opportunity for speeding tickets....

Warning to Farkers: There is new technology that makes it far easier for the police to detect and cite you for speeding. The days of a cop needing to pull off the road and hit you with a radar or laser gun are coming to an end. I got popped last week by a state patrolman. He was driving on the other side of a divided highway and as he and I both crested a hill, his blues came on. It didn't even take a second. I had just entered a zone where the speed limit drops from 70 to 55 and I was still doing 70. He pulled me and gave me a warning. I asked how he did that so fast and he told me their new system automatically detects the speed of an oncoming car and, if it is speeding, it initiates a traffic stop immediately and sends a notice of the stop, along with GPS coordinates, back to the patrol post. Pretty slick, but damn. Since the new cruisers don't even look like police cars, avoiding speeding tickets is going to be hard to do.
 
2012-12-17 11:30:31 AM  
When I tried to read it via mobile, it just asked me for username/password. Here I see the whole marketing bit.

Thanks for posting the full article.
 
2012-12-17 11:31:13 AM  
Drove through NM last summer as part of a vacation travel, as an out of state vehicle, prime pickings for local quotas, I drove through hundreds of miles of that state at 55, with every other vehicle whipping past me as if I were standing still.

Oh yeah and the headlight thing, that was weird, middle of the day bright New Mexican sun and headlights on. There was a sign every few miles, no headlights, tickets! Weird.
 
2012-12-17 11:34:33 AM  

had98c: As an Albuquerque resident, I don't have a problem with the safety corridor. It's only a few miles long from the Big I (I-25/I-40 interchange) south to Gibson/Sunport Blvd. Unless there's a buttload of people trying to get off at Avenida Cesar Chavez to get to a Lobo game, it's rarely a problem and really doesn't negatively impact travel through the area. I can still get from my apartment near Rio Rancho all the way to the Sunport in 15-20 minutes unless there's a crash on I-25. This article is a total non-story.


I love that part of I-25... at least if people aren't going slow (read: less than 10 over). It's so swervy and fun... good way to snap out of the trance-inducing trip from Socorro.
 
2012-12-17 11:35:03 AM  

vudukungfu: ///Got laid at the Jemez hotsprings.


I love Jemez hotsprings. I love how you can camp there even though you're not supposed to because they're not going to tow your car and they're not going to hike up the mountain to arrest you.
 
2012-12-17 11:39:53 AM  
Around the DC Beltway in MD they have "DUI Enforcement Zone" signs. Shouldnt the whole road be an "enforcement zone"? I guess thats code for its gonna cost ya more
 
2012-12-17 11:43:43 AM  

JackieRabbit: Increases the opportunity for speeding tickets....

Warning to Farkers: There is new technology that makes it far easier for the police to detect and cite you for speeding. The days of a cop needing to pull off the road and hit you with a radar or laser gun are coming to an end. I got popped last week by a state patrolman. He was driving on the other side of a divided highway and as he and I both crested a hill, his blues came on. It didn't even take a second. I had just entered a zone where the speed limit drops from 70 to 55 and I was still doing 70. He pulled me and gave me a warning. I asked how he did that so fast and he told me their new system automatically detects the speed of an oncoming car and, if it is speeding, it initiates a traffic stop immediately and sends a notice of the stop, along with GPS coordinates, back to the patrol post. Pretty slick, but damn. Since the new cruisers don't even look like police cars, avoiding speeding tickets is going to be hard to do.


In NJ, "Safety Corridors" increase speeding fines and points significantly. I can't see how the NM police wouldn't want to enforce this since they can easily get higher fines.
 
2012-12-17 11:46:48 AM  
President Raygun
Drove through NM last summer as part of a vacation travel, as an out of state vehicle, prime pickings for local quotas, I drove through hundreds of miles of that state at 55, with every other vehicle whipping past me as if I were standing still.

I-40 & I-25 are 75mph outside of the cities & many secondary highways are 65mph.Where the hell were you driving?


Oh yeah and the headlight thing, that was weird, middle of the day bright New Mexican sun and headlights on. There was a sign every few miles, no headlights, tickets! Weird.


Uh,there's no daytime headlight law here.The "Click it or ticket" signs refer to seat belts,not lights.
 
2012-12-17 11:54:18 AM  

jaylectricity: vudukungfu: ///Got laid at the Jemez hotsprings.

I love Jemez hotsprings. I love how you can camp there even though you're not supposed to because they're not going to tow your car and they're not going to hike up the mountain to arrest you.


We used to visit the sheriff and let him know we were camping and picking up all the trash and removing it.
 
2012-12-17 12:01:12 PM  

I Am The Bishop Of East Anglia: JackieRabbit: Increases the opportunity for speeding tickets....

Warning to Farkers: There is new technology that makes it far easier for the police to detect and cite you for speeding. The days of a cop needing to pull off the road and hit you with a radar or laser gun are coming to an end. I got popped last week by a state patrolman. He was driving on the other side of a divided highway and as he and I both crested a hill, his blues came on. It didn't even take a second. I had just entered a zone where the speed limit drops from 70 to 55 and I was still doing 70. He pulled me and gave me a warning. I asked how he did that so fast and he told me their new system automatically detects the speed of an oncoming car and, if it is speeding, it initiates a traffic stop immediately and sends a notice of the stop, along with GPS coordinates, back to the patrol post. Pretty slick, but damn. Since the new cruisers don't even look like police cars, avoiding speeding tickets is going to be hard to do.

In NJ, "Safety Corridors" increase speeding fines and points significantly. I can't see how the NM police wouldn't want to enforce this since they can easily get higher fines.


Here in GA, the state patrol is pretty cool; they will often let you off with a warning unless you are being reckless or violating the "super speeder law -- going over 80 mph). It's the country bumpkin sheriff's deputies you have to be careful for. In some rural counties with interstates and US highways, speeding tickets are a major source of revenue. Luckily, they can't usually afford the new high-tech equipment. But that doesn't stop them from double-teaming, with a cop with a radar gun on an overpass a half mile into a speed reduction zone.
 
2012-12-17 12:49:14 PM  

vudukungfu: jaylectricity: vudukungfu: ///Got laid at the Jemez hotsprings.

I love Jemez hotsprings. I love how you can camp there even though you're not supposed to because they're not going to tow your car and they're not going to hike up the mountain to arrest you.

We used to visit the sheriff and let him know we were camping and picking up all the trash and removing it.


Kudos to you, picking up trash on BLM and at other hidden camping spots is our "Camping Fee" around here! You quickly find out that "ButtWipe" (Bud Light) is the most littered can in Northern New Mexico!
 
2012-12-17 01:14:47 PM  
Each and every safety corridor in existence is nothing but a two-lane road nicknamed Blood Alley that was going to be upgraded to four sometime in 1956 - but funding has been cut every single year since then, despite getting busier and busier every year with idiots and drunks always trying to pass. I found out recently that one of the ones in my hometown actually had the right of way for a freeway bought up in the 60's, and is now finally slated to be built in 2014.

Safety corridors are what happens when all of your state's transportation money goes to its biggest city.
 
2012-12-17 01:27:57 PM  
I've driven the I-40 Safety Corridor several times and I can tell you, it's not a half bad idea. This particular stretch has very few--if any--curves. It's like 20 miles of open, flat, straight interstate. There are virtually no towns and little in the way of civilization or traffic. Speaking from experience, it's very easy to go into that "hypnotic" state while you're driving down this particular stretch of road because you could almost drive it while asleep.

So slowing down your speed just a tad plus turning on your headlights (even in the day time) might not be a completely stupid idea.
 
2012-12-17 01:50:43 PM  
Subby misspelled it.

Its "$afety corridor".
 
2012-12-17 01:57:22 PM  

Frantic Freddie: President Raygun
Drove through NM last summer as part of a vacation travel, as an out of state vehicle, prime pickings for local quotas, I drove through hundreds of miles of that state at 55, with every other vehicle whipping past me as if I were standing still.

I-40 & I-25 are 75mph outside of the cities & many secondary highways are 65mph.Where the hell were you driving?


Oh yeah and the headlight thing, that was weird, middle of the day bright New Mexican sun and headlights on. There was a sign every few miles, no headlights, tickets! Weird.


Uh,there's no daytime headlight law here.The "Click it or ticket" signs refer to seat belts,not lights.


The corridor on I-10 between Deming and Lordsburg has signs telling you to turn on headlights. No threat of tickets, though. Never seen a cop on that stretch, but there's always plenty of county sheriffs patrolling the 65 mph zone at Lordsburg.
 
2012-12-17 02:00:19 PM  
Working at Sandia Labs, I go in the South gate, and at 5P,get the heck out there and back to Los Lunas. I used to go into ABQ when we first bought our house, now only go in town when I have to. The "big eye", as the 25/40 interchange is called, can really snarl traffic, moreso this happens at rush hour, traffic can back up for miles. 


/Shown on "Breaking Bad" quite a number of times.
 
2012-12-17 02:13:12 PM  
Safety Corridor? More like Revenue Corridor.
 
2012-12-17 04:03:21 PM  
We have Safety Zones on I-81 running thru here.
They are located at larger business parks/office areas.
Gets crazy busy in the morning and afternoon.
Lots of signs for Stay in Lane, Headlights On, No Aggresive Drving and Tailgateing.
None of it works, everyday traffic is F'd Up bad with accidents.
 
2012-12-17 04:07:13 PM  

strathmeyer: When I was in middle school, they would put up "drug free school zone" signs at every school that had a drug problem. It's how we knew where to get our drugs.


Oh man, my dad went to a school like that. They had a security guard at the front door and as the kids came in, he'd ask them "Are you carrying any weapons?" If they weren't, he'd loan them a knife or a club.
 
2012-12-17 04:32:36 PM  

cgraves67: It's not a paywall. They want to ask you some marketting oriented questions.

Article sum up:
The speed limit is lower on a particular stretch of highway due to a statistically high accident ratedrunk drivers.


/Used to live in NM.
 
2012-12-17 06:09:28 PM  
What a crappy website.
 
2012-12-17 11:38:56 PM  
I call them "white knuckle" corridors.
 
2012-12-18 10:57:08 AM  

Frantic Freddie: President Raygun
Drove through NM last summer as part of a vacation travel, as an out of state vehicle, prime pickings for local quotas, I drove through hundreds of miles of that state at 55, with every other vehicle whipping past me as if I were standing still.

I-40 & I-25 are 75mph outside of the cities & many secondary highways are 65mph.Where the hell were you driving?


Oh yeah and the headlight thing, that was weird, middle of the day bright New Mexican sun and headlights on. There was a sign every few miles, no headlights, tickets! Weird.


Uh,there's no daytime headlight law here.The "Click it or ticket" signs refer to seat belts,not lights.


www.fhwa.dot.gov

Lots of these sign in New Mexico
 
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