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(Some Farker's Job)   Dust in the stellar wind, all we are is dust in the stellar wind   (subarutelescope.org) divider line 14
    More: Interesting, Subaru Telescope, Protoplanetary Disk, astronomical observatory, planet formation, stellar winds, UX Tauri A., molecular clouds, spatial resolution  
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2283 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Dec 2012 at 7:46 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



14 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-12-16 06:55:06 AM
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-12-16 06:59:18 AM
Done in one.
 
2012-12-16 07:13:34 AM
We are all stardust.
 
2012-12-16 08:09:49 AM
This is going to be a really short thread thanks to cretinbob

/was gonna post the same.
 
2012-12-16 08:19:36 AM

Vertdang: This is going to be a really short thread thanks to cretinbob


Yeah, it was either them, or this guy...

a3.ec-images.myspacecdn.com
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-12-16 09:35:57 AM
What kind of dust? Did you do all those fancy measurements without getting an IR spectrum?
 
2012-12-16 09:54:06 AM

ZAZ: What kind of dust? Did you do all those fancy measurements without getting an IR spectrum?


I don't think these guys got an IR spectrum, since that instrument does coronagraphic imaging. But a quick google indicates that there might have been IR spectroscopy from the Spitzer space telescope.
 
2012-12-16 10:06:50 AM
So wait, is subby saying (s)he works on this project? So subs do all/most star planetary systems form out of disks? I mean I guess it makes sense that a spherical distribution of dust is going to completely collapse into a star but if there is enough net angular momentum you've got a shot at making planets. And its intuitive that a rotating blob is going to flatten out. But planetary systems seem to be really flat. At least ours is. Are planetary systems really really flat?
 
2012-12-16 11:27:01 AM

Krymson Tyde: We are all stardust.


graphics8.nytimes.com
 
2012-12-17 01:48:51 AM

rwfan: So wait, is subby saying (s)he works on this project?


I'm not a member of the project, but one of my jobs is in science operations at that telescope, so I've worked with the project members on several nights they were taking various data. (I have no idea when this specific data was taken, or whether I was there that night.)

rwfan: So subs do all/most star planetary systems form out of disks?


Pretty much so, as far as I know. I'm not a PhD or anything, though... not even a MSc.

rwfan: I mean I guess it makes sense that a spherical distribution of dust is going to completely collapse into a star but if there is enough net angular momentum you've got a shot at making planets. And its intuitive that a rotating blob is going to flatten out.


The shape of the initial distribution of dust/gas doesn't matter - if you have enough stuff being pulled together by gravity, you're basically going to end up with a sphere because of hydrostatic equilibrium.

assets.amuniversal.com

rwfan: But planetary systems seem to be really flat. At least ours is. Are planetary systems really really flat?


For some values of "really really," I guess. If you start with a spinning sphere/disk, bodies that form by stuff in that disk accreting are going to be mostly in a plane perpendicular to the axis of rotation, with near-circular orbits. But then you've got gravity affecting them, so smaller ones, especially, are likely to get slung into angled or elliptical orbits due to gravitational interaction with others.

In our own solar system, big things out to Neptune are close to being in the same plane, but Pluto's orbit is elongated, and little things like Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, and maybe asteroids are spread out a bit more from that plane. And further out, the Oort Cloud isn't a belt, but a cloud, which theoretically surrounds or mostly-surrounds our solar system.

There are some honest-to-god astronomers on here who might be able to provide more detail.

/subby
 
2012-12-17 01:54:26 AM
I've been to the Subaru telescope so I am really getting a kick out of these replies...
 
2012-12-17 01:59:17 AM

relaxitsjustme: I've been to the Subaru telescope so I am really getting a kick out of these replies...


<stitch>Aloha cousin!</stitch>
 
2012-12-17 02:32:36 AM
I'll throw in a pic from the start of work tonight... click for bigger.

www2.hawaii.edu
 
2012-12-17 02:40:36 AM
Mahalo brah!

I've been up there a number of times but alas those days are gone. I used to work for Fujitsu on Oahu and would come over when then needed extra bodies for a project. When I was in Hilo and there was something to do at the summit I would be the first in line to go. I couldn't understand why the Japanese would rather hang around in Hilo. That place is awesome. Not to mention the other world aspect of the place. You are one lucky dude.
 
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