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(Washington Post)   Why "The Hobbit" is a Christian film   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 121
    More: Interesting, Christian film, Nordic countries, Lexington, Kentucky, C.S. Lewis, liberal arts colleges, subtext  
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4868 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 15 Dec 2012 at 9:22 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-16 05:34:32 AM  

Fark You I'm Drunk: [3.bp.blogspot.com image 512x401]


Makes sense. I view the Hobbit as a continuation of the Christian themes in all of Peter Jackson's other films.


lh6.ggpht.com

gifsoup.com

Peter Jackson does have a rather refreshing take on Christian themes. Particularly on the virtues of kicking ass for the Lord.
 
2012-12-16 05:49:02 AM  
"Jesus? Yes.... that is what they used top call me. Jesus of Nazareth."

"You can call me Jesus the White."
 
2012-12-16 05:51:16 AM  

graggor: Gyrfalcon: Daikiki: graggor: this is final farewell to the tolkien univserse. peter jackson seems to have it right so far.

Just wait until he gets his hands on the Silmarilion. It'll probably end up being 16 four hour movies.

We should be so lucky. "The Children of Hurin" would be 16 four-hour movies all by itself.


hyperbole aside. He has enough material to fill this time. the movie didnt feel long. it was paced well and it was exciting. I didnt ever feel like unecesarry info was being told.


I agree, the movie was very well paced in my opinion. Scenes were given exactly the weight that they needed to have. I liked how it stayed fairly true to the book while also expanding upon it to give insight into characters and motivations.

And, yeah, if there are any more Tolkien adaptations, The Children of Hurin is perhaps the best candidate for it. It'd probably be depressing as hell, though.
 
2012-12-16 06:13:34 AM  

ClintonKun: And, yeah, if there are any more Tolkien adaptations, The Children of Hurin is perhaps the best candidate for it. It'd probably be depressing as hell, though.


Mmmm, dragon destroyed cities and accidental incest..
 
2012-12-16 07:03:30 AM  

Alphax: ClintonKun: And, yeah, if there are any more Tolkien adaptations, The Children of Hurin is perhaps the best candidate for it. It'd probably be depressing as hell, though.

Mmmm, dragon destroyed cities and accidental incest..


Accidental incest is the best
 
2012-12-16 07:57:48 AM  

thisispete: urban.derelict: Because Catholics and the RCC take what they want, force you to convert at swordpoint (or kill you if you refused) and then call it their own?

[lh4.googleusercontent.com image 220x269][lh3.googleusercontent.com image 214x252][lh4.googleusercontent.com image 217x207]
/WAIT TIL I TELL YOU ABOUT EASTER...

Conversion didn't happen by the sword in Western Europe. It happened via missionaries. There's a great episode of Hardcore History about this. Basically, if the king converted, everyone else converted too. But there was a very weird amalgam in early Christianity between the old traditions and the new with depictions of a warrior Christ in place of similar warlike pagan gods. It also made sense to keep the holidays. Basing them on the solstice, like Christmas/Yule/Saturnalia/Sol Invictus makes sense in a society where there isn't much literacy or many calendars, but everyone can see the sky.

The metaphor of reaching the lowest point in the year and the days starting to lengthen is also to be noted. There are obvious fertility parallels in Easter around Spring with its idea of resurrection after death. There's also some scriptural basis in its link with the Jewish festival of Passover and the timing of Easter, but again it falls on the Sunday following the first full moon that falls on or after the spring equinox and when calendars were rare, this was probably the most reliable way that communities throughout Christendom were on the same page.

The transition between paganism and Christianity was a gradual one and not an overwhelming revolution, so older traditions evolved and adopted new meanings. A new religion probably will find it difficult to succeed if they get rid of the festivals and piss ups enjoyed by previous generations. The Puritans outlawed Christmas when they were in charge in Britain, and the monarchy was swiftly restored after Cromwell's death.


Easter is literally the name of a pagan fertility goddess. OEstre? The festival was literally her holy day. "Parallels" my ass; this is co-option. Then there are the early saints which, thanks to the Irish and their written records, we know were primarily local and minor pagan deities re-purposed as Christian figures. Christianity spread in Europe by basically becoming a very hypocritical version of the already existing pagan belief systems that insisted -"no really"- it was monotheistic while abandoning everything that made it that. Even the most central tenets of Christianity -like the three-in-one male god, and a perfect, timeless deity- were directly taken from the two major groups of early Greek converts; the Pythagoreans and the Platonics/Zeus-one-and-only cults. And in the case of the very abstract three-in-one god of the Pythagoreans, that itself is taken from even earlier pagan beliefs; either the three-in-one female deities which Indo-European religions all over are absolutely filled with, or the possible cthonic triune god of Hades-Pluton-Dionysus (and does it really need to be pointed out that Their wife, Persephone, is an eternally virginal goddess, or that of the three, only Pluton has a story suggesting conventional birth?).

As to violence, while it wasn't the only driver of conversion it was hardly absent; histories from the various conversion periods are filled with the trashing of pagan temples, the killing of pagan priests, the burning of pagan texts, and in central Europe, the chopping down of holy trees (the last one's even a major event in the Charlemagne epics). People didn't just shrug their shoulders and start calling themselves Christians when their local warlord declared himself so, and convincing them was rarely an entirely peaceably affair. Heck, in the British Isle just deciding what brand of Christianity would predominate led to bloodshed, a conflict that played a major role in creating a rivalry between the English and various Celtic thrones that would last for centuries. Then there are the "fairy tales" and their explanation of the "practical religion" of commoners which, while hardly evidence of anything directly, certainly suggest an animosity between the old and new in their structure and content. Why would Europeans from the conversion periods have felt the need to hide all those old idols we've found cosseted away over the decades if there was nothing to fear from showing them?
 
2012-12-16 08:59:07 AM  
At the beginning, it is not clear why the reluctant Baggins has been tapped to help lead the Hobbits' grand adventure. Baggins "does not know his ability," Chance said, "but he knows he has the character to develop into the kind of hero who can rescue a civilization."


And that relates to Christ how? The thing with the Christ story that I remember is that he always knew he was the son of god.
 
2012-12-16 09:06:08 AM  

Gyrfalcon: Yes, with all the Norse themes and Celtic imagery, it's easy to see the Christian basis in there.

....why do people keep trying?


There are many Christians who can't stand to see anything non-Christian being popular.
 
2012-12-16 09:14:18 AM  
At the beginning, it is not clear why the reluctant Baggins has been tapped to help lead the Hobbits' grand adventure. Baggins "does not know his ability," Chance said, "but he knows he has the character to develop into the kind of hero who can rescue a civilization."

Bilbo only found the damned thing, that was his whole purpose. To hold onto it until Frodo got it and Gandalf knew more about it.

Tolkien loathed allegory, by the way.
 
2012-12-16 09:47:24 AM  
If you're particularly nuts about this sort of thing, the Tolkien Professor is a podcast that may be worth a listen. Basically, it's a way the hell too in-depth analysis of everything Tolkien, any imagery, symbolism, etc. from this professor at Washington University. If you're bored or obsessive enough, it may be worth a listen. Link
 
2012-12-16 11:12:37 AM  
Stone's "Wall Street" is a much more Christian film than "Hobbit." At least how Christianity is currently practiced.
 
2012-12-16 11:12:41 AM  

Jake Havechek: At the beginning, it is not clear why the reluctant Baggins has been tapped to help lead the Hobbits' grand adventure. Baggins "does not know his ability," Chance said, "but he knows he has the character to develop into the kind of hero who can rescue a civilization."

Bilbo only found the damned thing, that was his whole purpose. To hold onto it until Frodo got it and Gandalf knew more about it.

Tolkien loathed allegory, by the way.


Actually you could argue the ring found him.
 
2012-12-16 11:12:50 AM  
Tolkien was a devout Catholic, but wrote that his stories were not meant to be allegorical in any way. He proposed them as an imagined, legendary history for England.

That said, I think Tolkien was an amazing linguist (Inventing quenya and all that), and one of the best world builders, but his characters are boring. They're either evil or good, no in-between, and any member of the man race who wasn't white was evil; except for the Numenoreans, who were white people who became evil and...black.
 
2012-12-16 11:33:21 AM  
Tolkien was a world builder more than anything.

He made up a bunch of shiat that many people enjoy and have fun with.

Wish people could treat the bible the same way but there isnt as much fun in it.
 
2012-12-16 12:22:47 PM  
Headlines like this make me want to cut the cord to my cable modem. I think anything with "Christian" in it makes me physically ill.
 
2012-12-16 05:59:28 PM  

Phil Moskowitz: Headlines like this make me want to cut the cord to my cable modem. I think anything with "Christian" in it makes me physically ill.


snarkerati.com
 
2012-12-16 07:45:05 PM  

Jgok: DanZero: So are we gonna get a review from our fine friends at CapAlert?

Wonder how this falls on the W I S D O M meters

How in the name of FSM have I not seen that site yet?

/bookmarked for HOURS of entertainment later
//"flash of implication of female upper nudity" indeed...


That site is awesome. I love how they catalogue every tattoo, piercing and instance of kids being rude to their parents.

Be sure to check out their review of the South Park movie.

South Park is an incredibly dangerous movie for those who do not understand or are developing an understanding of the Gospel ....... INCREDIBLY dangerous!
 
2012-12-17 04:39:43 AM  

towatchoverme: Phil Moskowitz: Headlines like this make me want to cut the cord to my cable modem. I think anything with "Christian" in it makes me physically ill.

[snarkerati.com image 500x405]


Well played.
 
2012-12-17 08:52:26 AM  

Manfred J. Hattan: The figure who gives his life to defeat evil and allow man's salvation was Gollum. Just sayin', is all.


So you're saying that Gollum is an avatar of some diety?
 
2012-12-19 01:02:06 AM  

Gyrfalcon: Yes, with all the Norse themes and Celtic imagery, it's easy to see the Christian basis in there.

....why do people keep trying?


Because they have little faith in the faith they are professing. They have to get their god's pawprints on every other mythology in the form of a "stealth allegory" in order to feel better about the fact that Christianity is a relative newcomer in world religions, and is clearly cobbled together with more retconning and thematic scrapbooking than a rack of current Marvel comics.

If you find a religion that doesn't really want to talk about itself, and whose adherents don't come to your door, want you to contribute to a collection plate or buy a magazine, investigate further. They might actually have something to offer, as manifested by offering nothing at the front end. Christians want to make more Christians, all the time. The doctrine of a duty to convert in order to assure salvation is a pyramid scheme Cheops wishes he'd thought of.
 
2012-12-19 01:03:58 AM  

beantowndog: Bilbo fought a dragon, just like jesus.


And took a little naked guy's ring, without even a reacharound.

Damn you, Bilbo Christ.
 
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