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(BBC)   "In Hinglish, a co-brother is a brother-in-law; eve-teasing means sexual harassment; an emergency crew responding to a crisis might be described as 'airdashing', and [...] a 'stadium' refers to a bald man with a fringe of hair"   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 57
    More: Weird, the bald man, Hinglish, American Universities, linguistics, squashes, computational linguistics, Latin alphabet, social hierarchy  
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4564 clicks; posted to Geek » on 15 Dec 2012 at 4:01 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-15 04:09:26 PM
i199.photobucket.com

/oblig
 
2012-12-15 04:09:53 PM
For us Americans, eve-teasing is closer to cat-calling and what not that you find in may traditional Hispanic environments. It is a form of sexual harassment for sure but not quite in the same way that we find "normal" sexual harassment. Additionally, it often occurs in the evening or at night.
 
2012-12-15 04:12:56 PM
Is it weird that although I've never heard any of those before, I understood them immediately?
 
2012-12-15 04:21:37 PM

Kuroshin: Is it weird that although I've never heard any of those before, I understood them immediately?


Your Hinglish is strong, young one.
 
2012-12-15 04:21:55 PM

Richard Saunders: [i199.photobucket.com image 325x225]

/oblig


You're my hero.
 
2012-12-15 04:25:36 PM

weapon13: Kuroshin: Is it weird that although I've never heard any of those before, I understood them immediately?

Your Hinglish is strong, young one.


Uhm...yay me?
 
2012-12-15 04:25:45 PM
I had enough trouble understanding "A Clockwork Orange."

"There was me, that is Alex, and my three droogs, that is Pete, Georgie, and Dim, and we sat in the Korova Milkbar trying to make up our rassoodocks ..."
 
2012-12-15 04:30:48 PM
FTFA: "English remains the single most commonly-used language on the web."

Why do I think this is false?
 
2012-12-15 04:40:56 PM

Richard Saunders: [i199.photobucket.com image 325x225]

/oblig


The needful has been done.
 
2012-12-15 04:41:45 PM

King Something: Richard Saunders: [i199.photobucket.com image 325x225]

/oblig

The needful has been done.


*shakes tiny fist*
 
2012-12-15 04:42:29 PM

King Something: Richard Saunders: [i199.photobucket.com image 325x225]

/oblig

The needful has been done.


I thought to 'do the needful' meant to power down your computer and then turn it back on again.
 
2012-12-15 04:46:46 PM
Why would Indian English be "Hinglish"? Why not Inglish or Indilish?
 
2012-12-15 04:46:50 PM
Ah....so now I understand what this song is about....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZBmeIa1wXFI
 
2012-12-15 04:48:21 PM

marius2: FTFA: "English remains the single most commonly-used language on the web."

Why do I think this is false?


As a completely unscientific assessment, Wikipedia's main page states that there are +4M articles in English. The runner-up is German with 1.43M.
 
2012-12-15 04:53:38 PM

albuquerquehalsey: Why would Indian English be "Hinglish"? Why not Inglish or Indilish?


Most people speak Hindi there I believe.
 
2012-12-15 05:01:55 PM

tricycleracer: marius2: FTFA: "English remains the single most commonly-used language on the web."

Why do I think this is false?

As a completely unscientific assessment, Wikipedia's main page states that there are +4M articles in English. The runner-up is German with 1.43M.


Hmm, I was always under the impression that it was Mandarin or something. Guess I'm the one who's wrong then.
 
2012-12-15 05:03:35 PM

marius2: tricycleracer: marius2: FTFA: "English remains the single most commonly-used language on the web."

Why do I think this is false?

As a completely unscientific assessment, Wikipedia's main page states that there are +4M articles in English. The runner-up is German with 1.43M.

Hmm, I was always under the impression that it was Mandarin or something. Guess I'm the one who's wrong then.


Might be different if those stats could peer inside the great firewall of china. also gotta consider whether or not bullshiat like tweets or facebook posts count, by sheer population alone I'd expect those two would tip the scale in their favour.
 
2012-12-15 05:04:58 PM
Pic from the article:

news.bbcimg.co.uk

Made me think:

i46.tinypic.com
 
2012-12-15 05:10:57 PM
There's even a new concept of time - "pre-pone", the opposite of postpone, meaning "to bring something forward".

Eww, I don't think I like that one.
 
2012-12-15 06:01:02 PM

marius2: FTFA: "English remains the single most commonly-used language on the web."

Why do I think this is false?


Why would you?

Many of the first nations to embrace the Internet were either ones who used English as their primary language, who used English as an official secondary language or who have English language requirements in primary school.

All of my relatives in Germanic countries speak nearly perfect English. The last new word they picked up from me was "spatula" (Küche Freund auf Schweizerdeutsch). I can barely hold a conversation in German with their 4 and 5 year-old kids.

And on the topic of German, have you ever tried to use it in the border areas of France, Poland or the Czech Republic? Many of them know it, but they generally aren't going to offer to speak to you with it. Only a few times in France have locals offered to speak to me in it. Why would it be any different online?



albuquerquehalsey: Why would Indian English be "Hinglish"? Why not Inglish or Indilish?


Because India does not have an official language, outside of official central government channels. So you have Hindi, Bengali, Punjabi, Marathi, Gujarati, Oriya, Sindhi, Saraiki, Nepali and a few others. Overall, there are a few hundred dialects spoken in India. It is utterly maddening to communicate over there. Supposedly some areas dislike speaking Hindi for political reasons, so they prefer to use English to speak to other Indians instead.

I've heard that some Cantonese speakers dislike speaking Mandarin for the same reason, which is why they prefer to use English. That's often an easy tell to determine if somebody is from mainland China (Queens) or Taiwan (American English).
 
2012-12-15 06:24:40 PM
Take that Esperanto.

We will have a 1 world language someday.
 
2012-12-15 06:32:24 PM

Virtual Pariah: Take that Esperanto.

We will have a 1 world language someday.


English is the new lingua franca.
 
2012-12-15 06:54:02 PM

Twilight Farkle: Virtual Pariah: Take that Esperanto.

We will have a 1 world language someday.

English is the new lingua franca.


Simlish is what it will evolve for our eloi descendants.
 
2012-12-15 07:03:48 PM

Virtual Pariah: Take that Esperanto.


What a great idea when inventing a new language to make all nouns have a gender.
 
2012-12-15 07:21:41 PM
"a 'stadium' refers to a bald man with a fringe of hair" also known as a "bozo ring"
 
2012-12-15 07:46:06 PM
I personally deal with Hinglish, often from no-nothing 'SA' that seem to think that diagnostics are some magic wand that will make their system better. Nevermind the fact they never checked their system to see that that hard drive was failed until it's mirror drive died, too. Sorry, I can't recover your data when you let the whole RAID 1 die.
 
2012-12-15 07:58:18 PM

Dinjiin: I've heard that some Cantonese speakers dislike speaking Mandarin for the same reason, which is why they prefer to use English. That's often an easy tell to determine if somebody is from mainland China (Queens) or Taiwan (American English).


I've never noticed this.

I'd assume if a Cantonese speaker prefers English over Mandarin, it's probably because their Mandarin is terrible.
 
2012-12-15 09:08:08 PM
So there was a interview with Schneider (drummer) from Rammstein in Mexico. The audience spoke Spanish, the interviewer spoke Spanish, but Schneider does not speak Spanish (Till, does but they weren't interviewing him yet). So both the interviewer and Schneider spoke English, which was then subtitled to Spanish for the audience. Something like that has also happened with interviews in Norway, Finland and Denmark - the band and the interviewer speak English as their only common language. What's really funny is when the clip is in English, subtitled into whatever other language, which is then further subtitled in English.
 
2012-12-15 10:10:59 PM

King Something: Richard Saunders: [i199.photobucket.com image 325x225]

/oblig

The needful has been done.


Are you sure? I have a doubt.
 
2012-12-15 10:12:12 PM

DetrimentalScience: For us Americans, eve-teasing is

NOT A PHRASE IN OUR LANGUAGE.
 
2012-12-15 10:48:48 PM

LandStander: There's even a new concept of time - "pre-pone", the opposite of postpone, meaning "to bring something forward".

Eww, I don't think I like that one.


It could be taken one of two ways.
Pre-pwn, wherein an obviously hardcore gamer dips his teabag on your forehead BEFORE shooting you
or some weird sexual fetish in which cornbread/cornmeal/corn cobs are inserted into one or more orifices before some subsequent lascivious activities.
 
2012-12-15 10:54:56 PM

sendtodave: Dinjiin: I've heard that some Cantonese speakers dislike speaking Mandarin for the same reason, which is why they prefer to use English. That's often an easy tell to determine if somebody is from mainland China (Queens) or Taiwan (American English).

I've never noticed this.

I'd assume if a Cantonese speaker prefers English over Mandarin, it's probably because their Mandarin is terrible.


For internet communication, I'd think it would have to deal with keyboards... imagine having to deal with a mandarin/cantonese keyboard: I'd be like "screw it! I'll just use a phonetic language!"
 
2012-12-15 11:09:26 PM

marius2: Hmm, I was always under the impression that it was Mandarin or something. Guess I'm the one who's wrong then.


Mandarin might be the single most common native-language. But English wouldn't be just for those who speak it as a native language, but for everyone who wants to communicate with the aggressively mono-linguistic Americans. For an earlier comparison, I found a treaty between Russia and England in the 1800s written in French, because that was the default second language for most educated people - using international diplomatic correspondence of the 1800s, you would assume 90% of the world spoke French
 
2012-12-15 11:16:23 PM

Dinjiin: Supposedly some areas dislike speaking Hindi for political reasons,


Tamils, for example.
 
2012-12-15 11:53:18 PM

Dinjiin: Because India does not have an official language, outside of official central government channels. So you have Hindi, Bengali, Punjabi, Marathi, Gujarati, Oriya, Sindhi, Saraiki, Nepali and a few others. Overall, there are a few hundred dialects spoken in India. It is utterly maddening to communicate over there. Supposedly some areas dislike speaking Hindi for political reasons, so they prefer to use English to speak to other Indians instead.


Yeah, the Indian subcontinent's one of the world's great polyglot areas. 438 extant languages. What's even more interesting is the number of language families represented--at least eight major families, and a passel of unclassified languages as well.

www.worldgeodatasets.com

That's just a coarsely-drawn map. This one's a little more detailed. But not much.

\you could even ask a chick there if she speaks Anal without getting slapped
\\or ask if she's a Birhor
 
2012-12-15 11:56:09 PM

GypsyJoker: Dinjiin: Because India does not have an official language, outside of official central government channels. So you have Hindi, Bengali, Punjabi, Marathi, Gujarati, Oriya, Sindhi, Saraiki, Nepali and a few others. Overall, there are a few hundred dialects spoken in India. It is utterly maddening to communicate over there. Supposedly some areas dislike speaking Hindi for political reasons, so they prefer to use English to speak to other Indians instead.


Yeah, the Indian subcontinent's one of the world's great polyglot areas. 438 extant languages in India alone. What's even more interesting is the number of language families represented--at least eight major families, and a passel of unclassified languages as well.


FTFM.
 
2012-12-16 12:52:14 AM
In Konglish, "skinship" means intimate physical contact: handholding, touching, caressing.

That's a good one. Clear, concise, and deserves to be more generally adopted.
 
2012-12-16 02:07:35 AM

phalamir: Mandarin might be the single most common native-language. But English wouldn't be just for those who speak it as a native language, but for everyone who wants to communicate with the aggressively mono-linguistic Americans.


Well, there's no real incentive. We only have two direct neighbors, only one of which is non-English speaking, and as for the rest of the world, England's aggressive colonialism seeded the language everywhere it went. It wasn't Americans who brought English to India or the Far East.

Anyway, as has been pointed out upthread, Americans who ARE polyglot get frustrated when they go overseas, and the natives hear their accent and switch to English. Especially frustrating if they're a native speaker and have developed an American accent over time...
 
2012-12-16 02:31:27 AM

ScreamingHangover: imagine having to deal with a mandarin/cantonese keyboard


...

what is this I don't even

...

IT'S THE SAME WRITTEN LANGUAGE!
 
2012-12-16 04:00:10 AM
Wouldn't antepone be better?
 
2012-12-16 08:41:42 AM

ScreamingHangover: sendtodave: Dinjiin: I've heard that some Cantonese speakers dislike speaking Mandarin for the same reason, which is why they prefer to use English. That's often an easy tell to determine if somebody is from mainland China (Queens) or Taiwan (American English).

I've never noticed this.

I'd assume if a Cantonese speaker prefers English over Mandarin, it's probably because their Mandarin is terrible.

For internet communication, I'd think it would have to deal with keyboards... imagine having to deal with a mandarin/cantonese keyboard: I'd be like "screw it! I'll just use a phonetic language!"


When typing in Chinese, you type the word out in Pinyin and then the computer displays a list of characters that you can choose.
 
2012-12-16 08:52:11 AM

Jlop985:
When typing in Chinese, you type the word out in Pinyin and then the computer displays a list of characters that you can choose.


I wonder if that's the way Japanese keyboards work, too. What I've seen seems to mesh with what you described for Chinese,

The Japanese written language seems mind-bogglingly complex, although I can see how one could write some fairly good poetry with it.
 
2012-12-16 08:59:52 AM
Why can't we all learn to speak Galach from a standardized set of filmbooks? That would kill off most sources of miscommunication.
 
2012-12-16 10:59:41 AM
There is probably something to this, but the way it written makes me think that the internet will change English about as much as Rich Hall did with Sniglets.
 
2012-12-16 01:53:11 PM
Wandering off page, I found an article link that says:

2. In China, crowded public swimming pools are called boiling dumplings.
More details (Financial Times)

"Chinese" is a very pictoresque language whether you are talking Mandarin or one of the many other "dialects" such as Cantonese.
 
2012-12-16 02:02:26 PM

GypsyJoker: Dinjiin: Because India does not have an official language, outside of official central government channels. So you have Hindi, Bengali, Punjabi, Marathi, Gujarati, Oriya, Sindhi, Saraiki, Nepali and a few others. Overall, there are a few hundred dialects spoken in India. It is utterly maddening to communicate over there. Supposedly some areas dislike speaking Hindi for political reasons, so they prefer to use English to speak to other Indians instead.


Yeah, the Indian subcontinent's one of the world's great polyglot areas. 438 extant languages. What's even more interesting is the number of language families represented--at least eight major families, and a passel of unclassified languages as well.

[www.worldgeodatasets.com image 500x616]

That's just a coarsely-drawn map. This one's a little more detailed. But not much.

\you could even ask a chick there if she speaks Anal without getting slapped
\\or ask if she's a Birhor


This is not a post I would expect from someone with that handle...
 
2012-12-16 02:14:39 PM

sendtodave: ScreamingHangover: imagine having to deal with a mandarin/cantonese keyboard

...

what is this I don't even

...

IT'S THE SAME WRITTEN LANGUAGE!


Jlop985: When typing in Chinese, you type the word out in Pinyin and then the computer displays a list of characters that you can choose.


There are actually several types of keyboard setups.

The most basic for Westerners is the hanyu pinyin, where you type in the pinyin and a list of characters comes up.

Taiwan uses a different pinyin system from mainland China that they developed independently. It's called bopomopho (or that's how it's referred to, referencing the first few sounds in a long list you have to remember), so presumably the keyboard would be set up differently.

However, most native Chinese speakers in Chiina do not use pinyin. Instead, they use a system where you type characters based on stroke order. Because in written Chinese all characters have a single 'correct' order in which the strokes are to be written, you can make a typing system off of it where you start with the first stroke and go from there. There are also shortcuts for commonly used components of characters.
 
2012-12-16 02:42:40 PM

Kuroshin: GypsyJoker: Dinjiin: Because India does not have an official language, outside of official central government channels. So you have Hindi, Bengali, Punjabi, Marathi, Gujarati, Oriya, Sindhi, Saraiki, Nepali and a few others. Overall, there are a few hundred dialects spoken in India. It is utterly maddening to communicate over there. Supposedly some areas dislike speaking Hindi for political reasons, so they prefer to use English to speak to other Indians instead.


Yeah, the Indian subcontinent's one of the world's great polyglot areas. 438 extant languages. What's even more interesting is the number of language families represented--at least eight major families, and a passel of unclassified languages as well.

[www.worldgeodatasets.com image 500x616]

That's just a coarsely-drawn map. This one's a little more detailed. But not much.

\you could even ask a chick there if she speaks Anal without getting slapped
\\or ask if she's a Birhor

This is not a post I would expect from someone with that handle...


I'm kinda amused by this. Why?
 
2012-12-16 05:10:28 PM
I'll just leave this here, saar, for all your hinglish needs Link 

/Needful has been done
 
2012-12-17 02:26:25 AM

sendtodave: ScreamingHangover: imagine having to deal with a mandarin/cantonese keyboard

...

what is this I don't even

...

IT'S THE SAME WRITTEN LANGUAGE!


No. It's. Not. But all Chinese characters look the same to you. One example, characters in Mandarin for San Francisco could be translated "old gold mountain". Cantonese uses characters that sound like "sahn fahn" for "sahn fahn city".
 
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