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(Short List)   The 10 Greatest Apocalypse Movies - Doesn't include '2012' mainly because it's a steaming pile of big old horse shiat   (shortlist.com) divider line 124
    More: Cool, Children of Men, Clive Owen, Dr. Strangelove, apocalypses, Peter Sellers, Woody Harrelson, Charlton Heston, Jesse Eisenberg  
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7742 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 15 Dec 2012 at 9:53 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-15 04:45:23 PM

namatad: meh - in some ways, I could not care less.
They were what they were. They kept me watching and The Road was amazing at times.
As a post apocalyptic movie it was close to perfect.
Survive. Nothing more, Nothing less. No religion. No explanation. No meaning.
My child.
Period.

WHAT would and could you do to survive and help your child survive?
WOULD you quit, would you make it, would you be able to do it?
These were thrown in our face. HARD. No feel good. No silly easy or luck or or or. Just a lot of EFFORT.




I liked The Road, I just thought its dialogue would probably work better in book form. I stand by statement on Children of Men. Goofy pretentious crap.
 
2012-12-15 04:49:40 PM

namatad: redsquid: I'd also love to see 'A Canticle for Liebowitz' made into a GOOD film..

my god they would ruin my favorite book
but yah
farking cretins would make it into an action fill and I would have to kill myself


FTFY
 
2012-12-15 05:00:57 PM

FeedTheCollapse: I stand by statement on Children of Men. Goofy pretentious crap.


Hear, hear! Children of Men wasn't horrible, but it WAS bad.
 
2012-12-15 05:12:35 PM

FeedTheCollapse: costermonger: //don't think it was really attempting to 'take on issues'



it made at least one direct reference to Abu Ghraib... there was probably more, but I haven't seen it since it came out. The references it made, not just to Abu Ghraib, just felt kind of random and like a substitute for depth; none of it really added up to some kind of over-arching message.


Yeah, I know it referenced the Iraq war and a couple other current day events but I didn't really parse that as making an attempt to take on any issues. If I remember correctly, that showed up as an element of a character's back story - she was a former journalist, wrote a bunch of articles about human rights and such, and was tortured (or something) as a result and that's why she's seemingly catatonic. I think referencing historical events that way makes sense (Abu Ghraib would've been 20+ years in the past for the movie's timeframe) for a movie that was supposed to present a dystopian version of our current world.
 
2012-12-15 05:18:32 PM

BigLuca: Shrugging Atlas: Threads is the most depressing piece of fiction I've ever seen. I wouldn't watch it again for money. God almighty....

Try Grave of the Fireflies. It'll help cheer you up.


Or Barefoot Gen
 
2012-12-15 05:20:10 PM

FeedTheCollapse: namatad: meh - in some ways, I could not care less.
They were what they were. They kept me watching and The Road was amazing at times.
As a post apocalyptic movie it was close to perfect.
Survive. Nothing more, Nothing less. No religion. No explanation. No meaning.
My child.
Period.

WHAT would and could you do to survive and help your child survive?
WOULD you quit, would you make it, would you be able to do it?
These were thrown in our face. HARD. No feel good. No silly easy or luck or or or. Just a lot of EFFORT.



I liked The Road, I just thought its dialogue would probably work better in book form. I stand by statement on Children of Men. Goofy pretentious crap.


Children of Men blew ass.
 
2012-12-15 05:27:02 PM
I should also add that I understand the 'lack of depth' complaint but I don't think it's one of those stories (or even genres) where there's a need to explain anything more than necessary to set the story or give the story some kind of over-arching message. In my opinion Children of Men is just a very well made 'on the run' movie that is set in a depressingly believable hopeless world. If it had a moral, it wasn't about the treatment of refugees or anything that specific, it was about how children keep humanity (relatively) sane.
 
2012-12-15 05:31:13 PM

FeedTheCollapse: Hyde


i see the mr hyde ad in the background, but when i scroll down a lot i see the list. but it is hard to read that hyde ad is in the background.
 
2012-12-15 05:49:08 PM

redsquid: namatad: redsquid: I'd also love to see 'A Canticle for Liebowitz' made into a GOOD film..

my god they would ruin my favorite book
but yah
farking cretins would make it into an action fill and I would have to kill myself

FTFY


THIS !!!!
 
2012-12-15 06:02:53 PM

costermonger: I should also add that I understand the 'lack of depth' complaint but I don't think it's one of those stories (or even genres) where there's a need to explain anything more than necessary to set the story or give the story some kind of over-arching message.


I don't think it needed to explain anything. My complaint was that it made references seemingly randomly as a way to be perceived as deep. I still see the occasional "OMG, I just discovered the reference to Pink Floyd's 'Animals' in Children of Men!" posts every now and then like it was at all subtle. It's a movie that begs to be taken seriously (yeah yeah, insert "it insists upon itself" comments)
 
2012-12-15 06:18:43 PM
Children of Men was one of those movies where I knew what they were going for and I really wanted to like it, but it just didn't quite get there. It had potential, but it was missing something for me. The movie was just meh to me. Not terrible, but not good.
 
2012-12-15 06:22:00 PM
Movies not on the list that I always liked:
Miracle Mile
Mad Max
The Road Warrior
Dark City
Planet of the Apes
The Matrix (first one only)
Logan's Run
They Live
Hell Comes to Frog Town
UK ending of Army of Darkness
 
2012-12-15 06:39:25 PM

libranoelrose: Pocket Ninja: This list does not contain "Night of the Comet," therefore it is an abject failure.

Word.


Daddy would have gotten us Uzis.
 
2012-12-15 07:03:44 PM

Rafe: Good list.

I've always been fond of Last Night as a pseudo-apocalypse film. Not the one with Keira Knightley from a couple years back; Don McKellar's directorial effort from '98. It's more of an examination of how different people handle the impending apocalypse rather than the event itself (its nature is never articulated) or what happens afterward, but it's certainly one of my favourite end-of-the-world themed movies. There's a great mixture of black humour and real emotional punch -- not hard when you've got such talents as Sarah Polley, Sandra Oh and Callum Keith Rennie in your cast of Canadian all-stars.


I agree wholeheartedly!
 
2012-12-15 07:35:52 PM

Delawheredad: The list is missing "Testament" arguably on "Treads" cuts a deeper emotional impact. It tells the story of a small village in northern California that is spared blast damage from world War III but then everyone slowly begins to die of radiation sickness. Sad doesn't begin to cover it.


This. "Testament" is possibly the saddest movie ever made.
 
2012-12-15 07:37:38 PM

FeedTheCollapse: costermonger: I should also add that I understand the 'lack of depth' complaint but I don't think it's one of those stories (or even genres) where there's a need to explain anything more than necessary to set the story or give the story some kind of over-arching message.

I don't think it needed to explain anything. My complaint was that it made references seemingly randomly as a way to be perceived as deep. I still see the occasional "OMG, I just discovered the reference to Pink Floyd's 'Animals' in Children of Men!" posts every now and then like it was at all subtle. It's a movie that begs to be taken seriously (yeah yeah, insert "it insists upon itself" comments)


Yeah ok, that one was cheesy.
 
2012-12-15 09:44:53 PM

BigLuca: Rafe: Good list.

I've always been fond of Last Night as a pseudo-apocalypse film. Not the one with Keira Knightley from a couple years back; Don McKellar's directorial effort from '98. It's more of an examination of how different people handle the impending apocalypse rather than the event itself (its nature is never articulated) or what happens afterward, but it's certainly one of my favourite end-of-the-world themed movies. There's a great mixture of black humour and real emotional punch -- not hard when you've got such talents as Sarah Polley, Sandra Oh and Callum Keith Rennie in your cast of Canadian all-stars.

Just watched Keira Knightley last night in Seeking a Friend from the End of the World. Which is kinda an impending apocalypse movie. Strictly comedy though. It didn't get great reviews, but I really liked it.


Count me as a second vote for "Seeking a Friend for the End of the World". I really enjoyed it. It made me laugh, it made me cry. It was sappy and sweet and sarcastic. I am a big Steve Carell fan, and it's always nice to see his sad-sack bit done differently.
 
2012-12-15 11:02:57 PM

FeedTheCollapse: costermonger: I should also add that I understand the 'lack of depth' complaint but I don't think it's one of those stories (or even genres) where there's a need to explain anything more than necessary to set the story or give the story some kind of over-arching message.

I don't think it needed to explain anything. My complaint was that it made references seemingly randomly as a way to be perceived as deep. I still see the occasional "OMG, I just discovered the reference to Pink Floyd's 'Animals' in Children of Men!" posts every now and then like it was at all subtle. It's a movie that begs to be taken seriously (yeah yeah, insert "it insists upon itself" comments)


Whatever floats your boat I guess. I didn't read too much into it or anything. I just really enjoyed the story for what it was. The scene where they are walking out of the building during the battle and everyone slowly realizes whatss goin on and stops fighting to marvel at this one little baby girl is heart wrenching to me.
 
2012-12-15 11:30:37 PM

PirateKing: BigLuca: Rafe: Good list.

Just watched Keira Knightley last night in Seeking a Friend from the End of the World. Which is kinda an impending apocalypse movie. Strictly comedy though. It didn't get great reviews, but I really liked it.

Count me as a second vote for "Seeking a Friend for the End of the World". I really enjoyed it. It made me laugh, it made me cry. It was sappy and sweet and sarcastic. I am a big Steve Carell fan, and it's always nice to see his sad-sack bit done differently.


You should check out The Invention of Lying Link. Not really the same genre, but I have the same "feeling" about the movie.
 
2012-12-16 04:17:09 AM

Tyrone Slothrop: Replace "Omega Man" with "The Last Man on Earth". Still not quite up to the original story, but it's the closest version made.

/"I am Legend" might have been closer if they had kept the original ending.


I can't stand "Last Man on Earth". Vincent Price was so miscast that it made my brain hurt. I wanted to like it as I love the book, but I just couldn't.
 
2012-12-16 09:31:12 AM
When I was 8, I saw this movie and thought it was the most fascinating and terrifying thing ever.

d2oz5j6ef5tbf6.cloudfront.net
 
2012-12-17 08:47:57 AM
I saw The Day After when it was originally shown.. It scared the absolute hell out of me then, and going back on it, I still just get this horrible feeling. Nobody wins... I think it had the desired effect. I was 16 when it first aired.

I had heard about Threads, ;but it wasn't until about six or so years ago I was finally able to see it. It made the Day After look like Mr. Rogers neighborhood.

I'm 46, and the thought of an all out nuclear war still scares the shiat out of me...
 
2012-12-17 12:20:08 PM

WhippingBoy: "Children of Men" sucked.

/there, I said it


I thought it was brilliant
 
2012-12-17 01:46:20 PM
I have to admit, I'm a sucker for big CGI apocalypse movies. I've watched The Day After Tomorrow and 2012 multiple times. Both are in the 'so bad it's good' category, but that sub genre, along with monster movies, are a real guilty pleasure of mine. So I obviously loved Cloverfield.
 
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