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(YouTube)   What happens when you put magnets into copper pipe? Magic   (youtube.com) divider line 77
    More: Cool, copper pipe  
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11737 clicks; posted to Video » on 14 Dec 2012 at 10:45 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-14 10:48:45 AM
magic.
 
2012-12-14 10:50:55 AM
How do they work?
/duh
 
2012-12-14 11:03:46 AM
magic Science.
 
2012-12-14 11:18:30 AM
It behaves diamagnetic?
 
2012-12-14 11:24:58 AM
That should probably read paramagnetic, and I probably should not post on Fark before finishing my morning coffee.
 
2012-12-14 11:31:31 AM
I could probably entertain myself for hours doing the same thing, but somehow a minute-long video was a complete waste of time.
 
2012-12-14 11:40:50 AM
I've always wanted to solder some surface mount LEDS to a copper pipe and try that. Don't know if there's enough induced current or voltage to make them light up, though.
 
2012-12-14 11:46:30 AM
i2.kym-cdn.com
 
2012-12-14 11:56:03 AM
Ex-lax always helps me when I get like that.
 
2012-12-14 12:02:18 PM

Fish in a Barrel: I've always wanted to solder some surface mount LEDS to a copper pipe and try that. Don't know if there's enough induced current or voltage to make them light up, though.


The pipe would make a dead short (and the path of least resistance) for any induced current wouldn't it?
 
2012-12-14 12:12:45 PM

IAMTHEINTARWEBS: Fish in a Barrel: I've always wanted to solder some surface mount LEDS to a copper pipe and try that. Don't know if there's enough induced current or voltage to make them light up, though.

The pipe would make a dead short (and the path of least resistance) for any induced current wouldn't it?


Aww... you're right. Nothing would flow through the LEDs. :(
 
2012-12-14 12:19:43 PM
Copper isn't particularity magnetic, it safe to say to say this wasn't a typical magnet but rather one of those super strong rare-earth magnets.
 
2012-12-14 12:26:33 PM

Fish in a Barrel: IAMTHEINTARWEBS: Fish in a Barrel: I've always wanted to solder some surface mount LEDS to a copper pipe and try that. Don't know if there's enough induced current or voltage to make them light up, though.

The pipe would make a dead short (and the path of least resistance) for any induced current wouldn't it?

Aww... you're right. Nothing would flow through the LEDs. :(


Cut through one side, solder each leg of the LED to a side.
 
2012-12-14 12:26:44 PM
Is this what kids consider science now a days?

This was my science toy..

i.imgur.com
 
2012-12-14 12:27:57 PM

Galloping Galoshes: Fish in a Barrel: IAMTHEINTARWEBS: Fish in a Barrel: I've always wanted to solder some surface mount LEDS to a copper pipe and try that. Don't know if there's enough induced current or voltage to make them light up, though.

The pipe would make a dead short (and the path of least resistance) for any induced current wouldn't it?

Aww... you're right. Nothing would flow through the LEDs. :(

Cut through one side, solder each leg of the LED to a side.


That should work
 
2012-12-14 12:29:10 PM

dennysgod: Copper isn't particularity magnetic, it safe to say to say this wasn't a typical magnet but rather one of those super strong rare-earth magnets.


The effect has nothing to do with copper's magnetism. It's caused by copper's electrical conductivity.

A moving magnet through conductive coils generates current, which in turn generates electro-magnetic force.
 
2012-12-14 12:33:07 PM
Oh yeah....think I need more coffee.
 
2012-12-14 12:37:47 PM
Nifty pipe he had there. I bet that's over $20 worth of copper alone, not counting the costs of making the pipe.

/ Eddy currents: how do they work?
 
2012-12-14 12:41:35 PM

SomeTexan: Eddy currents:


He was good until he put out that ukulele album.
 
2012-12-14 12:49:52 PM
I like the part where he puts the magnet through the pipe.
 
2012-12-14 12:59:04 PM

dennysgod: Copper isn't particularity magnetic, it safe to say to say this wasn't a typical magnet but rather one of those super strong rare-earth magnets.


It's not magnetic, but it is conductive. If the magnet isn't moving then there's no attraction, but because the magnet enters the pipe, it induces a field, that in turn attracts the magnet.

/enters the pipe- he he
 
2012-12-14 01:44:28 PM
So, if we could reverse that effect, say get a big magnet and send copper through it, could we make a BFG?
 
2012-12-14 01:49:54 PM
Farking Lenz's law, how does it work?
 
2012-12-14 02:15:51 PM
Is the shape of that pipe necessary (narrow opening on one end with the connical profile) for that effect?

I already have one of those magnets but I'd hate to try and locate a big enough piece of copper pipe only to find I needed it machined.
 
2012-12-14 02:37:04 PM

Fizpez: Is the shape of that pipe necessary (narrow opening on one end with the connical profile) for that effect?

I already have one of those magnets but I'd hate to try and locate a big enough piece of copper pipe only to find I needed it machined.


Nope. Works with any copper pipe, including long ones. I tested with my 1/2" cube neodymium through a 3 foot piece of 3/4 pipe.
 
2012-12-14 02:38:13 PM

Treygreen13: I like the part where he puts the magnet through the pipe.


Dang it. I missed that part. Off to watch it more carefully this time.
 
2012-12-14 02:45:10 PM
This works with aluminum pipe too.
 
2012-12-14 02:46:51 PM
I've done this too. What the flux?
 
2012-12-14 03:08:38 PM

Fizpez: Is the shape of that pipe necessary (narrow opening on one end with the connical profile) for that effect?

I already have one of those magnets but I'd hate to try and locate a big enough piece of copper pipe only to find I needed it machined.


Doesn't actually need to be pipe. I've done similar things with a big hunk of flat aluminum stock. Obviously has to slide down rather than fall-through, but the effect works. The steeper the angle, the more noticeable the effect. The pipe is most impressive of course, but use what you got.
 
2012-12-14 03:14:43 PM

ThisIsntMe: So, if we could reverse that effect, say get a big magnet and send copper through it, could we make a BFG?


Can you say "Rail Gun"...
 
2012-12-14 03:35:54 PM

IAMTHEINTARWEBS: Galloping Galoshes: Fish in a Barrel: IAMTHEINTARWEBS: Fish in a Barrel: I've always wanted to solder some surface mount LEDS to a copper pipe and try that. Don't know if there's enough induced current or voltage to make them light up, though.

The pipe would make a dead short (and the path of least resistance) for any induced current wouldn't it?

Aww... you're right. Nothing would flow through the LEDs. :(

Cut through one side, solder each leg of the LED to a side.

That should work


I highly doubt it. I have no idea what kind of current that thing is inducing, but I guarantee the voltage drop from one side to the other is just a hair to the right of 0. LEDs require around 2-3 volts of voltage potential to even begin to function, and you're never going to get that across a few inches of solid copper unless you push tens of thousands, perhaps millions of amps through it, and by then you'd have less of a copper pipe and more of a copper puddle.
 
2012-12-14 04:24:07 PM

Poppa Zit: ThisIsntMe: So, if we could reverse that effect, say get a big magnet and send copper through it, could we make a BFG?

Can you say "Rail Gun"...


That actually wouldn't be a rail gun. A rail gun has a piece of metal (the ballistic round) which literally runs along two rails. A current is passed through the rails and the round, and the current drives it up the rails and out of the gun.

A metal projectile fired through a long tubular magnet would be a Coil Gun, but it has to be an series of electro-magnets to propel the object in the desired direction.
If you just had a big tube rare earth magnet and dropped a copper ball through it, I think you would see the same effect being seen in this video, but I haven't done the math on it.  Plus, rare earth magnets of that size and shape are not all that common.
 
2012-12-14 04:36:18 PM

RobotSpider: Fizpez: Is the shape of that pipe necessary (narrow opening on one end with the connical profile) for that effect?

I already have one of those magnets but I'd hate to try and locate a big enough piece of copper pipe only to find I needed it machined.

Doesn't actually need to be pipe. I've done similar things with a big hunk of flat aluminum stock. Obviously has to slide down rather than fall-through, but the effect works. The steeper the angle, the more noticeable the effect. The pipe is most impressive of course, but use what you got.


Doesn't have to be a big hunk, either. Paramagnetism/eddy currents/big-ass-electromagnets are used at comingled recyling facilities to separate out aluminum cans from paper/plastics.
 
2012-12-14 04:47:41 PM
That video has redefined "moderately interesting" for me forever.
 
2012-12-14 05:35:40 PM

dennysgod: Copper isn't particularity magnetic, it safe to say to say this wasn't a typical magnet but rather one of those super strong rare-earth magnets.


Brilliant deduction, Holmes. Also, from the video description: "Neodymium magnet".
 
2012-12-14 05:49:53 PM
I don't see why we aren't using these as fire escapes. Jumping into one of these tubes and floating down to the ground just sounds like too much fun. Just don't forget your magnetic vest
 
2012-12-14 05:58:46 PM

Rising_Zan_Samurai_Gunman: Plus, rare earth magnets of that size and shape are not all that common.



I buy my large super- magnets here
 
2012-12-14 05:59:06 PM
it's also fun to put magnetic field tape, which turns colors in the presence of magnetic fields, around the pipe.


disturbingly organic. for extra fun, use a magnet that can spin while it drops down the pipe.

(i used one that was JUST small enough, and it went prprprprpprrprprpprprprprprprp all the way down. far too amusing. )
 
2012-12-14 06:07:19 PM

badspella: dennysgod: Copper isn't particularity magnetic, it safe to say to say this wasn't a typical magnet but rather one of those super strong rare-earth magnets.

It's not magnetic, but it is conductive. If the magnet isn't moving then there's no attraction, but because the magnet enters the pipe, it induces a field, that in turn attracts the magnet.

/enters the pipe- he he


Close. The moving magnet induces changing eddy currents (from Faraday's Law), which since they are changing with time too, have their own magnetic fields, which slows it down.
 
2012-12-14 06:23:26 PM
i911.photobucket.com
/not posted yet?
//am dissapoint
 
2012-12-14 06:32:12 PM

Rising_Zan_Samurai_Gunman: Poppa Zit: ThisIsntMe: So, if we could reverse that effect, say get a big magnet and send copper through it, could we make a BFG?

Can you say "Rail Gun"...

That actually wouldn't be a rail gun. A rail gun has a piece of metal (the ballistic round) which literally runs along two rails. A current is passed through the rails and the round, and the current drives it up the rails and out of the gun.

A metal projectile fired through a long tubular magnet would be a Coil Gun, but it has to be an series of electro-magnets to propel the object in the desired direction.
If you just had a big tube rare earth magnet and dropped a copper ball through it, I think you would see the same effect being seen in this video, but I haven't done the math on it.  Plus, rare earth magnets of that size and shape are not all that common.


Coil gun won't work on copper. Coil guns work by attracting magnetic material through a series of magnetized coils.

Rail gun is a closer effect to this, except that you replace the permanant magnet with the rails.

Also, the reverse effect of having a permanant tube magnet with a copper ball in the middle would be the same effect.
See
 
2012-12-14 06:32:28 PM
www.spacepub.com
 
2012-12-14 06:59:58 PM

Gen. Patton Harvey Oswalt: badspella: dennysgod: Copper isn't particularity magnetic, it safe to say to say this wasn't a typical magnet but rather one of those super strong rare-earth magnets.

It's not magnetic, but it is conductive. If the magnet isn't moving then there's no attraction, but because the magnet enters the pipe, it induces a field, that in turn attracts the magnet.

/enters the pipe- he he

Close. The moving magnet induces changing eddy currents (from Faraday's Law), which since they are changing with time too, have their own magnetic fields, which slows it down.


I think the word you're looking for was "Incomplete". If I edit yours I get "..induces.. magnetic field[s], [which slows it down]". Am I missing something? I was going for Fark-u-cational", rather than detail the electromotive forces and parasitic current flow effects on free-body permanent magnets interacting along an enveloping Cu linear path.
 
2012-12-14 07:11:19 PM
This doesn't have to be neodymium either, we've done the same demo with regular alnico or similar magnets, it's just not quite as impressive.

On a side note, I hope that guy is careful where he puts his hand while he's holding that magnet. Get it anywhere near another one of that strength and he could do some real damage.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YsLnBcXIH4E
 
2012-12-14 07:14:49 PM
It didn't even blow up.

/leaving disappointed
 
2012-12-14 07:15:37 PM
Ann Coulter does strange things when shes bored.
 
2012-12-14 07:38:37 PM
I was disappointed to discover I read 'magnets' as 'midgets'.
 
2012-12-14 08:26:06 PM
"The great thing about science is that it's true, whether or not you believe in it"

d24w6bsrhbeh9d.cloudfront.net
 
2012-12-14 08:30:20 PM

Fish in a Barrel: I've always wanted to solder some surface mount LEDS to a copper pipe and try that. Don't know if there's enough induced current or voltage to make them light up, though.


Not with a pipe, with a coil. I've seen it done--someone bought a spool of copper wire, where the spool was plastic. They were able to get access to both ends of the wire without unwinding it from the spool. A magnet dropped through the hollow center of the spool could light an LED connected to the coil, but you have to get the polarity right.
 
2012-12-14 08:37:38 PM

Fish in a Barrel: I've always wanted to solder some surface mount LEDS to a copper pipe and try that. Don't know if there's enough induced current or voltage to make them light up, though.


express.howstuffworks.com 

Shake, shake, shake.
Shake, shake, shake...
 
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