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(Some Gal)   Professional chef discourages amateur cooks from profession. "Kitchens attract bullies because they've read Kitchen Confidential too many times or they think the Gordon Ramsay they see on TV is the real Gordon Ramsay. It's a joy to weed them out"   (dirtcandynyc.com) divider line 122
    More: Obvious, Kitchen Confidential, Gordon Ramsay, right-wing radio, chefs, cooking schools, Kitchens attract, basic skills, kitchens  
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4161 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 13 Dec 2012 at 6:00 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-13 05:18:30 PM  
First thing Gordon Ramsay does when he goes to speak at culinary schools and to other chefs is to start with: "Do not treat your staff like I do on television. This is entertainment, if you do this in real life you will lose all of your employees"
 
2012-12-13 05:37:06 PM  
As someone who worked at a shiatty on-campus restaurant for four years during college and a year afterwards, and who had a summer job working the line (salads and desserts) at a real restaurant, I have to agree with this guy. If you're going to be a chef, you need to learn to deal with, and enjoy, the monotony of four-five hours of prep followed by six hours of single-minded repetition. It's not exciting in the way it's made to be on TV. It's not about "showing your soul" or "treating the ingredients with respect" or other such bullshiat. It's about chopping onions and cutting chicken breast and cooking veggies and putting things on a damn plate.
 
2012-12-13 05:50:59 PM  

Rincewind53: As someone who worked at a shiatty on-campus restaurant for four years during college and a year afterwards, and who had a summer job working the line (salads and desserts) at a real restaurant, I have to agree with this guy. If you're going to be a chef, you need to learn to deal with, and enjoy, the monotony of four-five hours of prep followed by six hours of single-minded repetition. It's not exciting in the way it's made to be on TV. It's not about "showing your soul" or "treating the ingredients with respect" or other such bullshiat. It's about chopping onions and cutting chicken breast and cooking veggies and putting things on a damn plate.


Boring is right. I had root veggie prep at a restaurant once, I never peeled so many god damned onions in my entire life.
 
2012-12-13 05:52:30 PM  

Rincewind53: As someone who worked at a shiatty on-campus restaurant for four years during college and a year afterwards, and who had a summer job working the line (salads and desserts) at a real restaurant, I have to agree with this guy. If you're going to be a chef, you need to learn to deal with, and enjoy, the monotony of four-five hours of prep followed by six hours of single-minded repetition. It's not exciting in the way it's made to be on TV. It's not about "showing your soul" or "treating the ingredients with respect" or other such bullshiat. It's about chopping onions and cutting chicken breast and cooking veggies and putting things on a damn plate.


... you're the equivalent of man who paints houses as a living saying that Michelangelo's job was boring.

No offense, but what you are doing is a job at, as you said yourself, working at a shiatty on-campus restaurant and working line at what was most likely the equivalent of an Olive Garden.

That's not what a chef is, or does. You're not doing it because it's a passion for you either, or because you have the training for it.

You're really not qualified to talk about what being a chef is as a career, no offense.

/worked in restaurants most of life since I was 16
//actually went to culinary school
///worked in proper restaurants
////monotony? what on earth are you talking about?
 
2012-12-13 05:55:04 PM  
And I am sorry if I sound like a condescending asshole, but trust me, none of my friends still working in that world would agree with you, and agree 100% with what I said.

I don't mean to be rude, but you haven't got a clue if you think that what you've experienced is anything like what it is in the real culinary world. Look, I have also worked those jobs that you are talking about early on, therefore I can sympathize, but as I said, you're the culinary equivalent of a $10/hour house painter.
 
2012-12-13 05:55:31 PM  

Tatsuma: Rincewind53: As someone who worked at a shiatty on-campus restaurant for four years during college and a year afterwards, and who had a summer job working the line (salads and desserts) at a real restaurant, I have to agree with this guy. If you're going to be a chef, you need to learn to deal with, and enjoy, the monotony of four-five hours of prep followed by six hours of single-minded repetition. It's not exciting in the way it's made to be on TV. It's not about "showing your soul" or "treating the ingredients with respect" or other such bullshiat. It's about chopping onions and cutting chicken breast and cooking veggies and putting things on a damn plate.

... you're the equivalent of man who paints houses as a living saying that Michelangelo's job was boring.

No offense, but what you are doing is a job at, as you said yourself, working at a shiatty on-campus restaurant and working line at what was most likely the equivalent of an Olive Garden.

That's not what a chef is, or does. You're not doing it because it's a passion for you either, or because you have the training for it.

You're really not qualified to talk about what being a chef is as a career, no offense.

/worked in restaurants most of life since I was 16
//actually went to culinary school
///worked in proper restaurants
////monotony? what on earth are you talking about?


"Mr. Hooper, I'm not talkin' about pleasure boatin' or day sailin'. I'm talkin' about workin' for a livin'. I'm talkin' about sharkin'!"
 
2012-12-13 05:58:25 PM  
"The whole cinema industry is boring as shiat, I've never had to fetch as many coffees, stand around doing nothing or do boring shiat as I did for those 3 years, not worth it' - PA to 2nd unit director commenting on Hitchcock
 
2012-12-13 06:04:30 PM  

Tatsuma: And I am sorry if I sound like a condescending asshole, but trust me, none of my friends still working in that world would agree with you, and agree 100% with what I said.

I don't mean to be rude, but you haven't got a clue if you think that what you've experienced is anything like what it is in the real culinary world. Look, I have also worked those jobs that you are talking about early on, therefore I can sympathize, but as I said, you're the culinary equivalent of a $10/hour house painter.


I was referring specifically to the part of the article that talks about the need to stand in front of a pot of boiling water for 8 hours.

Prep work is monotonous, sorry. I loved doing the line; it was exciting, it was exhilarating at times, ad it was good work. I stand by what I said though, in context with the article.

/the restaurant I worked at over the summer was actually a pretty high quality restaurant. Still have no clue why the chef agreed to hire me.
 
2012-12-13 06:06:13 PM  

Tatsuma: "The whole cinema industry is boring as shiat, I've never had to fetch as many coffees, stand around doing nothing or do boring shiat as I did for those 3 years, not worth it' - PA to 2nd unit director commenting on Hitchcock


I loved short order, but I have a huge affection for food, and I ate too much for the owners to trust me back there. I blame myself.
 
2012-12-13 06:07:23 PM  
Tatsuma

OK. I'll bite. What culinary school did you attend?
 
2012-12-13 06:11:08 PM  
cdn-8.nflximg.com

Recommended viewing.
 
2012-12-13 06:11:22 PM  
Bourdain himself points out the tedium and rare opportunities to make real money in cooking. I guess assholes can be found anywhere but it seems the biz will eat anyone up
 
2012-12-13 06:17:05 PM  

Tatsuma: Rincewind53: As someone who worked at a shiatty on-campus restaurant for four years during college and a year afterwards, and who had a summer job working the line (salads and desserts) at a real restaurant, I have to agree with this guy. If you're going to be a chef, you need to learn to deal with, and enjoy, the monotony of four-five hours of prep followed by six hours of single-minded repetition. It's not exciting in the way it's made to be on TV. It's not about "showing your soul" or "treating the ingredients with respect" or other such bullshiat. It's about chopping onions and cutting chicken breast and cooking veggies and putting things on a damn plate.

... you're the equivalent of man who paints houses as a living saying that Michelangelo's job was boring.

No offense, but what you are doing is a job at, as you said yourself, working at a shiatty on-campus restaurant and working line at what was most likely the equivalent of an Olive Garden.

That's not what a chef is, or does. You're not doing it because it's a passion for you either, or because you have the training for it.

You're really not qualified to talk about what being a chef is as a career, no offense.

/worked in restaurants most of life since I was 16
//actually went to culinary school
///worked in proper restaurants
////monotony? what on earth are you talking about?


I love your creds...went to culinary school (failed to say GRADUATED from culinary school) and worked in proper restaurants (as a busboy? dishwasher? waiter?).

Show me a "chef" who can make a better burger or steak than I do on my own charcoal grill. And quit making burgers with "kobe beef" sh*t...$15 for a farking burger that isn't as good as mine, my ass. And the $30 steak that I can cook myself and which will taste better than your "chef's concoction"? Color me unimpressed re: the restaurant industry.
 
2012-12-13 06:17:26 PM  

Rincewind53: Prep work is monotonous, sorry.


Well, yeah. That's why, unless you work at a really small place or you're the owner, most chef will be involved in very little prep if any. That's why you have line grunts hired to do that.

Rincewind53: I loved doing the line; it was exciting, it was exhilarating at times, ad it was good work.


Yes, that's why I was confused about the monotonous comment. When you work as an actual chef, it's all about adrenaline, about the rush, about the passion and oh G-d I really miss it right now. It's almost animal where your body/instincts take over, the precision and all that. It was so fun.

Sadly, a side-effect is that this also leads to a lot of booze being drank after work to come down. I don't think I have ever met a chef who was not either an alcoholic (whether he realized it or not) or snorted massive amounts of cocaine/consumed lots of uppers

BunkyBrewman: OK. I'll bite. What culinary school did you attend?


An upper 2nd tier/lower 1st tier one.

I don't claim to be an amazing chef (though to be fair, I actually have a small claim to fame I will not discuss) and I have been out of the industry for about 3 years now, and most likely will never get back in, but I'd say more than a decade of experience entitles me to discuss this.
 
2012-12-13 06:17:30 PM  
Why would bullies flock to get abused?! You dont get to start at the top of the game you come in as a grunt and get treated as such.
 
2012-12-13 06:19:18 PM  
I would hate to do a job were I smelled like it when I went home.
 
2012-12-13 06:19:31 PM  
Is that one of those blog posts from someone in "the industry" like a waiter or chef? Listen, I don't give a fark about your feelings or what shenanigans or travails go on behind that kitchen door. I just want some good food and I'll pay you for it.

Make me my grub you slaves; maybe I'll give you the tip if I'm feeling particularly generous.
 
2012-12-13 06:20:07 PM  

DaCaptain19: Show me a "chef" who can make a better burger or steak than I do on my own charcoal grill. And quit making burgers with "kobe beef" sh*t...$15 for a farking burger that isn't as good as mine, my ass.


You clearly have no idea what you are talking about. I mean, seriously you whine about a $15 kobe beef burger?

Again, fairly sure that Olive Garden is about as great a restaurant you've ever eaten at.
 
2012-12-13 06:20:13 PM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: Why would bullies flock to get abused?! You dont get to start at the top of the game you come in as a grunt and get treated as such.


You're forgetting bully "alpha-male" mentallity. They're used to pushing smaller people around and just assume they'll get their way anywhere they go.
 
2012-12-13 06:21:51 PM  

Tatsuma: Well, yeah. That's why, unless you work at a really small place or you're the owner, most chef will be involved in very little prep if any. That's why you have line grunts hired to do that


Yes, that's why I was confused about the monotonous comment. When you work as an actual chef, it's all about adrenaline, about the rush, about the passion and oh G-d I really miss it right now. It's almost animal where your body/instincts take over, the precision and all that. It was so fun.

Yeah, my original post wasn't the best phrased. I think the real difference is that the article, and I, were primarily talking about being in the profession generally, not just being an executive chef at a nice restaurant. Even if you're the sous chef, you're there making stock for hours before the rush, and doing other prep. And if you are the executive chef, you're still going to be working on the line, expediting, and doing hard, solid work. I was just trying to get across the idea that being a chef is hard work, and it's not the flashy "let me show you my soul" bullshiat shown on Chopped.

/I do miss working on the line. Nothing like getting through a particularly crazy night to make you feel like you can conquer the world.
 
2012-12-13 06:21:56 PM  

Primum: Make me my grub you slaves; maybe I'll give you the tip if I'm feeling particularly generous.


We don't work based on tips.



What is wrong with people tonight?
 
2012-12-13 06:24:46 PM  

DaCaptain19:
Show me a "chef" who can make a better burger or steak than I do on my own charcoal grill. And quit making burgers with "kobe beef" sh*t...$15 for a farking burger that isn't as good as mine, my ass. And the $30 steak that I can cook myself and which will taste better than your "chef's concoction"? Color me unimpressed re: the restaurant industry.


That's some pretty funny stuff there.

Tell me. What percentage of fat do you prefer or your burgers? Just curious.
 
2012-12-13 06:24:50 PM  

Rincewind53: Yeah, my original post wasn't the best phrased. I think the real difference is that the article, and I, were primarily talking about being in the profession generally, not just being an executive chef at a nice restaurant. Even if you're the sous chef, you're there making stock for hours before the rush, and doing other prep. And if you are the executive chef, you're still going to be working on the line, expediting, and doing hard, solid work. I was just trying to get across the idea that being a chef is hard work, and it's not the flashy "let me show you my soul" bullshiat shown on Chopped.

/I do miss working on the line. Nothing like getting through a particularly crazy night to make you feel like you can conquer the world.


The prep work that you'll be doing as a sous-chef or an executive chef has nothing to do with what a line grunt is going to be doing. Preparing sauces, or broths, or all of those things that are actual integral and important ingredients of meals is a) pretty fun b) pretty important c) pretty precise so it doesn't feel repetitive d) not boring.

Yeah, peeling potatoes for 2 hours is pretty boring, but that's not what someone who's into this profession is going to be doing on a daily basis.

and yeah, that feeling is intense. It is a drug, straight up.
 
2012-12-13 06:26:10 PM  

Tatsuma:

BunkyBrewman: OK. I'll bite. What culinary school did you attend?

An upper 2nd tier/lower 1st tier one.

I don't claim to be an amazing chef (though to be fair, I actually have a small claim to fame I will not discuss) and I have been out of the industry for about 3 years now, and most likely will never get back in, but I'd say more than a decade of experience entitles me to discuss this.

 

Yeah, yeah, yeah... we all have small claims to fame. I mean, cripes, it seems everyone shows up on the Food Network sooner or later.

EIP if you want to share notes. Now you have me curious.
 
2012-12-13 06:27:35 PM  

Tatsuma: DaCaptain19: Show me a "chef" who can make a better burger or steak than I do on my own charcoal grill. And quit making burgers with "kobe beef" sh*t...$15 for a farking burger that isn't as good as mine, my ass.

You clearly have no idea what you are talking about. I mean, seriously you whine about a $15 kobe beef burger?

Again, fairly sure that Olive Garden is about as great a restaurant you've ever eaten at.



Hahahahahahahah!!!! Says the guy who "attended" an upper 2nd tier/lower 1st tier culinary school.

STFU and GBTW
 
2012-12-13 06:29:06 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: "Mr. Hooper, I'm not talkin' about pleasure boatin' or day sailin'. I'm talkin' about workin' for a livin'. I'm talkin' about sharkin'!"


"I don't need this working class hero crap!"
 
2012-12-13 06:29:24 PM  
I've never seen the "Hell's Kitchen" show Ramsay is notorious for, but I have seen and love his "Kitchen Nightmares" show, where he goes to failing restaurants and turns them around. He is definitely blunt in his assessments and demands everyone gives their best, but I've never seen him come down on someone who didn't deserve it, and he is usually pretty nice about it. He also is very complimentary to people who earn his respect. He reminds me of the best managers I've worked with, and I'd work with the guy in a second.
 
2012-12-13 06:29:46 PM  

DaCaptain19: Tatsuma: Rincewind53: As someone who worked at a shiatty on-campus restaurant for four years during college and a year afterwards, and who had a summer job working the line (salads and desserts) at a real restaurant, I have to agree with this guy. If you're going to be a chef, you need to learn to deal with, and enjoy, the monotony of four-five hours of prep followed by six hours of single-minded repetition. It's not exciting in the way it's made to be on TV. It's not about "showing your soul" or "treating the ingredients with respect" or other such bullshiat. It's about chopping onions and cutting chicken breast and cooking veggies and putting things on a damn plate.

... you're the equivalent of man who paints houses as a living saying that Michelangelo's job was boring.

No offense, but what you are doing is a job at, as you said yourself, working at a shiatty on-campus restaurant and working line at what was most likely the equivalent of an Olive Garden.

That's not what a chef is, or does. You're not doing it because it's a passion for you either, or because you have the training for it.

You're really not qualified to talk about what being a chef is as a career, no offense.

/worked in restaurants most of life since I was 16
//actually went to culinary school
///worked in proper restaurants
////monotony? what on earth are you talking about?

I love your creds...went to culinary school (failed to say GRADUATED from culinary school) and worked in proper restaurants (as a busboy? dishwasher? waiter?).

Show me a "chef" who can make a better burger or steak than I do on my own charcoal grill. And quit making burgers with "kobe beef" sh*t...$15 for a farking burger that isn't as good as mine, my ass. And the $30 steak that I can cook myself and which will taste better than your "chef's concoction"? Color me unimpressed re: the restaurant industry.


Hey! You got one! That's an automatic +2 troll points!

3/10
 
2012-12-13 06:31:18 PM  
That was a lot of words to say "Preparing food for people is a poor career choice."
 
2012-12-13 06:31:55 PM  
This sounds like every career.

My first IT job was imaging and setting up computers in cubicles. It's all I did all day long. Eventually you move on to a better position as you gain more experience and show that you can work properly in a certain environment. Fast forward a decade (holy shiat I'm getting old), and now I work on stuff that pushes my education, creativity and intelligence to the limit. I'm mentally exhausted after some days but feel fulfilled because I was "great" at something I enjoy doing.

I liked how he brushed on being called "chef" though. When I first started I wanted nothing more then to have the title of Senior System Administrator/Engineer. Now that I have it I could really care less about my title, as I now want nothing more then to be a Chief Information Officer. My how time changes us! :)
 
2012-12-13 06:33:14 PM  
Great article, thx for submitting it.

I've been in the industry for almost 20 years, started as a secretary at a distributor. Now I work for a manufacturer who and I sell my products to distributors and love I it. 

I work in about 5 kitchens a day and I can tell you that from my perspective there's someplace and something for everyone. There are good calm kitchens, clean kitchens (most of them are pretty clean), filthy disgusting kitchens, angry places that usually ask you to hold their check 'until Friday'.

And the jerks, bullies - they are out there, I have worked for them even in my part of the industry. But they often smell like alcohol regardless of the time of day. They will move on eventually, pretty quickly over the 20 years when I think about it, either by health issues or management. So I smile and wait for them to be gone. Then some other bully appears somewhere else...you'll always have one or two.

Seen it all.
 
2012-12-13 06:36:25 PM  

Psycoholic_Slag: Hahahahahahahah!!!! Says the guy who "attended" an upper 2nd tier/lower 1st tier culinary school.


The guy talked about a $15 Kobe beef burger. If that doesn't immediately make you go 'What the fark is he talking about?', something is wrong with you.

And I am sorry, but at some point unless you can afford to go to France or are one of the very very few accepted to work under incredible chefs, what I went to is basically as good as it gets.

BunkyBrewman: Yeah, yeah, yeah... we all have small claims to fame. I mean, cripes, it seems everyone shows up on the Food Network sooner or later.

EIP if you want to share notes. Now you have me curious.


Eh, nothing like showing up on the food network, and I would rather not discuss this as that would make me pretty easy to identify for any internet detective out there, and considering the amount of hate mail/death threats I've had over the years, I am a bit sensitive about personal info making it out there on the web
 
2012-12-13 06:37:50 PM  
While I can't comment on being a chef, I did work in a golden corrall style kitchen for about 2 years when I turned 16. Such a beat down. I cannot imagine the dedication required to do it on a more substantial level. I have no doubt things get better but I still have nightmares from feeding the ever ravenous masses craving fried chicken and grade D steak.

Oh and dont even get me started on the volume of food prep at those places. So many bus tubs......
 
2012-12-13 06:43:11 PM  

Tatsuma:

BunkyBrewman: Yeah, yeah, yeah... we all have small claims to fame. I mean, cripes, it seems everyone shows up on the Food Network sooner or later.

EIP if you want to share notes. Now you have me curious.

Eh, nothing like showing up on the food network, and I would rather not discuss this as that would make me pretty easy to identify for any internet detective out there, and considering the amount of hate mail/death threats I've had over the years, I am a bit sensitive about personal info making it out there on the web


No prob. I would have given you the name of my place. But I respect your privacy.

J&W '85
Three decades plus
...and yes, Food Network a few years ago
 
2012-12-13 06:45:08 PM  

Tatsuma: nothing like showing up on the food network, and I would rather not discuss this as that would make me pretty easy to identify for any internet detective out there, and considering the amount of hate mail/death threats I've had over the years, I am a bit sensitive about personal info making it out there on the web


If you don't want to talk about it, then don't talk about it. Having a "small claim to fame" that you refuse to talk about is the equivalent of having a hot canadian girlfriend.
 
2012-12-13 06:48:40 PM  

Wolf_Blitzer: Tatsuma: nothing like showing up on the food network, and I would rather not discuss this as that would make me pretty easy to identify for any internet detective out there, and considering the amount of hate mail/death threats I've had over the years, I am a bit sensitive about personal info making it out there on the web

If you don't want to talk about it, then don't talk about it. Having a "small claim to fame" that you refuse to talk about is the equivalent of having a hot canadian girlfriend.


Well shiat. If Wolf Blitzer says it, it must be true.
 
2012-12-13 06:49:33 PM  

Wolf_Blitzer: If you don't want to talk about it, then don't talk about it. Having a "small claim to fame" that you refuse to talk about is the equivalent of having a hot canadian girlfriend.


Yes, but he needs to drop enough cred to feel superior to the people he berates.
 
2012-12-13 06:49:45 PM  

Flappyhead: The Stealth Hippopotamus: Why would bullies flock to get abused?! You dont get to start at the top of the game you come in as a grunt and get treated as such.

You're forgetting bully "alpha-male" mentallity. They're used to pushing smaller people around and just assume they'll get their way anywhere they go.


In reality most bullies are "beta males". They're not typically the top of the social hierarchy -- the high school football captain, the most popular guy, and so on -- because that guy typically doesn't have to prove anything to anybody, and he can afford to be generous with his approval.

The bullies are generally the second or third tier types, who constantly need to reinforce their position by playing to the followers around them. And they pick on people who are not only defenseless in their own right but also unlikely to attract defenders, not because they are "cowards", but because that's the obvious lowest risk of being challenged and losing face publicly. (Occasionally one of these types will get over-promoted to CEO of a company, and it rarely ends well; more typically

And that's pretty much the mentality of these kitchen bullies too: they are in the middle of the kitchen hierarchy and they assert their limited power by bullying those underneath them. If that was really your point, it was an excellent one and I commend you for making it.
 
2012-12-13 06:50:07 PM  

BunkyBrewman: J&W '85
Three decades plus
...and yes, Food Network a few years ago


Jeeves & Wooster?? Impressive! *

Three decades? That's a lot of dedication. Cooking is a really strong passion of mine, but I realize that, at the end of the day, it's only my second passion. I love it so much, on the other hand, that if I had to go back in, that'd be fine with me as well.

And good job with the FN. I never would have wanted to go on, I would just hate being in front of the camera. Back of the house was perfectly fine for me. Incidentally, being in front of cameras might be part of my new career, but sacrifices and all that

*seriously, pretty good from what I heard

Wolf_Blitzer: If you don't want to talk about it, then don't talk about it. Having a "small claim to fame" that you refuse to talk about is the equivalent of having a hot canadian girlfriend.


I've had three of those as well
 
2012-12-13 06:52:37 PM  
I have been a grunt doing prep work and doing the same thing every day, working split shifts. I like to cook, but working in a professional kitchen is a grind. The author of the article makes a valid argument about having to put in your time and keep learning. I imagine a lot of people would like to become chefs without doing the required work. Much like people would like to be rock stars without learning how to play an instrument or put on a good show.
 
2012-12-13 06:53:47 PM  

czetie: (Occasionally one of these types will get over-promoted to CEO of a company, and it rarely ends well; more typically


Crap, posted too soon.Meant to say:

Occasionally one of these types will get over-promoted to CEO of a company, and it rarely ends well; more typically they flame out at the senior VP level. Steve Ballmer, for instance, is a classic over-promoted Beta in my opinion, and Scott Forstall sounds like one too.
 
2012-12-13 06:57:01 PM  

Tatsuma: Rincewind53: Prep work is monotonous, sorry.

Well, yeah. That's why, unless you work at a really small place or you're the owner, most chef will be involved in very little prep if any. That's why you have line grunts hired to do that.

Rincewind53: I loved doing the line; it was exciting, it was exhilarating at times, ad it was good work.

Yes, that's why I was confused about the monotonous comment. When you work as an actual chef, it's all about adrenaline, about the rush, about the passion and oh G-d I really miss it right now. It's almost animal where your body/instincts take over, the precision and all that. It was so fun.

Sadly, a side-effect is that this also leads to a lot of booze being drank after work to come down. I don't think I have ever met a chef who was not either an alcoholic (whether he realized it or not) or snorted massive amounts of cocaine/consumed lots of uppers

BunkyBrewman: OK. I'll bite. What culinary school did you attend?

An upper 2nd tier/lower 1st tier one.

I don't claim to be an amazing chef (though to be fair, I actually have a small claim to fame I will not discuss) and I have been out of the industry for about 3 years now, and most likely will never get back in, but I'd say more than a decade of experience entitles me to discuss this.


You made it to the second round on Chopped?
 
2012-12-13 06:59:47 PM  

miniflea: You made it to the second round on Chopped?


No.

But I am now living in Israel, and I have had four people come up to me saying 'Wait a minute, are you X who did Y in Z? [insert conversation about that]', and Y is something I did in Z, North America.
 
2012-12-13 07:02:18 PM  
See, I come from New Orleans. I was raised to be a saucier. Great saucier. Then I was supposed to go to Paris, study at the Escoffier school.
Then I got orders for my physical. Hell, I joined the Navy. Heard they had better food.

Cook school, that did it ... you don't want to hear about that.
 
2012-12-13 07:06:35 PM  

Tatsuma: BunkyBrewman: J&W '85
Three decades plus
...and yes, Food Network a few years ago

Jeeves & Wooster?? Impressive! *

Three decades? That's a lot of dedication. Cooking is a really strong passion of mine, but I realize that, at the end of the day, it's only my second passion. I love it so much, on the other hand, that if I had to go back in, that'd be fine with me as well.

And good job with the FN. I never would have wanted to go on, I would just hate being in front of the camera. Back of the house was perfectly fine for me. Incidentally, being in front of cameras might be part of my new career, but sacrifices and all that

*seriously, pretty good from what I heard


Pretty good? heh The only school we don't look down on is CIA....and even then, we think those guys are a bit too pretentious after they graduate. 

Dedication? More like I've lost my farking mind a long time ago. Something is seriously wrong with me to be in this business for so long. But I'm one of those rare freaks that actually enjoy going to work every day. (most of 'em anyway)
 
2012-12-13 07:07:23 PM  

Tatsuma: But I am now living in Israel, and I have had four people come up to me saying 'Wait a minute, are you X who did Y in Z? [insert conversation about that]', and Y is something I did in Z, North America.


(meaning, what I did in that place in North America in terms of signature dish was popular enough that almost two years later, some people from North America either traveling or living in Israel and casually hearing my name heard about it, which would make it really easy for an internet detective to put two and two together. as I said, on the other hand, in the grand scheme of things, it is a minor claim to fame)
 
2012-12-13 07:09:12 PM  

HellRaisingHoosier: This sounds like every career.

My first IT job was imaging and setting up computers in cubicles. It's all I did all day long. Eventually you move on to a better position as you gain more experience and show that you can work properly in a certain environment. Fast forward a decade (holy shiat I'm getting old), and now I work on stuff that pushes my education, creativity and intelligence to the limit. I'm mentally exhausted after some days but feel fulfilled because I was "great" at something I enjoy doing.

I liked how he brushed on being called "chef" though. When I first started I wanted nothing more then to have the title of Senior System Administrator/Engineer. Now that I have it I could really care less about my title, as I now want nothing more then to be a Chief Information Officer. My how time changes us! :)


It's the same in every industry. The top tier start noticing the job is not as easy as it once was, or maybe they are having a little bit of insecurity. Suddenly, they start telling everybody all the less than spectacular parts of the job. No one like too much good competition.
 
2012-12-13 07:09:13 PM  

Tatsuma: Tatsuma: But I am now living in Israel, and I have had four people come up to me saying 'Wait a minute, are you X who did Y in Z? [insert conversation about that]', and Y is something I did in Z, North America.

(meaning, what I did in that place in North America in terms of signature dish was popular enough that almost two years later, some people from North America either traveling or living in Israel and casually hearing my name heard about it, which would make it really easy for an internet detective to put two and two together. as I said, on the other hand, in the grand scheme of things, it is a minor claim to fame)


No, we all get it, she's Canadian. It's cool bro.
 
2012-12-13 07:09:47 PM  

BunkyBrewman: Pretty good? heh The only school we don't look down on is CIA....and even then, we think those guys are a bit too pretentious after they graduate.


Really? Well maybe it has changed in recent years, because while better (but certainly a lot pricier) than where I went, it wasn't described to me as THAT great. Certainly no straight ticket to a job as executive chef immediately out of the gate.

And yeah, to be in that business you need to have some marbles loose, but it's just part of the fun.

Man, I am moving into a new place very soon where I'll actually have a decent kitchen and, more importantly, access to great local ingredients, I am extremely excited about that. The last year and a half has been brutal (basically no access to a real kitchen)
 
2012-12-13 07:09:58 PM  

Tatsuma: BunkyBrewman: J&W '85
Three decades plus
...and yes, Food Network a few years ago

Jeeves & Wooster?? Impressive! *

Three decades? That's a lot of dedication. Cooking is a really strong passion of mine, but I realize that, at the end of the day, it's only my second passion. I love it so much, on the other hand, that if I had to go back in, that'd be fine with me as well.

And good job with the FN. I never would have wanted to go on, I would just hate being in front of the camera. Back of the house was perfectly fine for me. Incidentally, being in front of cameras might be part of my new career, but sacrifices and all that

*seriously, pretty good from what I heard

Wolf_Blitzer: If you don't want to talk about it, then don't talk about it. Having a "small claim to fame" that you refuse to talk about is the equivalent of having a hot canadian girlfriend.

I've had three of those as well


I love many of the songs on your I-Pod!

You seem like a good guy.

=]
 
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