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(NPR)   Archaeologists discover 7000 year-old tool that was important step in the development of modern civilization. Blessed are the cheesemakers   (npr.org) divider line 21
    More: Cool, The Salts, Bristol University, dairy products  
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2012-12-13 11:56:23 AM
The tool isn't just for cheesemakers, obviously it was meant to benefit any manufacturer of dairy products.
 
2012-12-13 12:31:25 PM
FTA: "How did we figure out how to do this?"

Moonshiners makes me ask the same question. Really, who thought, oh, i left this grain until it rotted, lets boil it and distill it and drink it. Whoa, I'm real f*cked up now, I'll give some to all my friends too"

it's like, magic.
 
2012-12-13 12:33:47 PM
Actually cheese makers were inspired by large breasted women tens of thousands of years ago.
The first cheese was Fromunder cheese.
When her breast was lifted, they scraped the cheese from under her breast.
/ History lesson for today
 
2012-12-13 12:35:52 PM
Done in one.
 
2012-12-13 12:37:47 PM
IBB (In before Bevets):

It's a falsehood planted by Lucifer to cause doubt in the Almighty God! Cheese can only be 6,000 years old!
 
2012-12-13 12:38:47 PM
deja vu...
 
2012-12-13 12:39:57 PM
I remember when they unearthed those. That is pretty cool actually.
 
2012-12-13 12:40:25 PM
And they found that its chemical signature matched cow's milk.


But not a match for cheese. Prove it was cheese, idiot eggheads.
 
2012-12-13 12:40:36 PM
Use only in queso emergency.
 
2012-12-13 12:41:47 PM

Louisiana_Sitar_Club: And they found that its chemical signature matched cow's milk.


But not a match for cheese. Prove it was cheese, idiot eggheads.


Read the article again, Einstein.
 
2012-12-13 12:43:14 PM

Keigh: FTA: "How did we figure out how to do this?"

Moonshiners makes me ask the same question. Really, who thought, oh, i left this grain until it rotted, lets boil it and distill it and drink it. Whoa, I'm real f*cked up now, I'll give some to all my friends too"

it's like, magic.


My understanding is that it was an Arabic traveller who stored milk in a sheep's stomach, and discovered on arrival that the milk had turned to cheese (rennet which helps make cheese possible is derived from animal stomach proteins). Instead of going ew, gross, he tried it, liked it and started messing with the process.
 
2012-12-13 12:43:29 PM

Rufus Lee King: Call me "Big Nose" one more time, mate, and I'll take you to the fookin' cleaners!

[i107.photobucket.com image 476x358]


I wasn't gonna pick my nose, I was gonna thump him!

/let's go to the stoning
 
2012-12-13 12:46:52 PM
Yet prostitution is all the oldest profession

/is that cheese on your stick, or are you just happy to see me?
 
2012-12-13 12:47:48 PM

KingKauff: Rufus Lee King: Call me "Big Nose" one more time, mate, and I'll take you to the fookin' cleaners!

[i107.photobucket.com image 476x358]

I wasn't gonna pick my nose, I was gonna thump him!

/let's go to the stoning


wut?
 
2012-12-13 12:49:01 PM
So the tool is older than the Earth itself. How does that work?
 
2012-12-13 12:49:45 PM

OutLawSuit: So the tool is older than the Earth itself. How does that work?


We built around it.
 
2012-12-13 12:52:23 PM

PainInTheASP: The tool isn't just for cheesemakers, obviously it was meant to benefit any manufacturer of dairy products.


And we're done here.
 
2012-12-13 12:53:11 PM
...for they shall inherit the curd.


/Blessed are the breadmakers, for theirs is the kingdom of leaven
 
2012-12-13 12:56:01 PM
Dammit, I was going to go for the "But Earth is only 6000 years old" troll, but Draskuul and OutLawSuit both beat me to it.

How about this, then, FTFA: "milk is a superfood".

Suck it, vegans.

// amidoingirite?
 
2012-12-13 01:02:35 PM
But he says Neolithic Europeans had a problem - like most modern humans, they were lactose intolerant.

Seriously? I wasn't aware that lactose intolerance was so wide spread, I've known two people in my lifetime who were, I guess I don't get out much.

Also, I always get a kick out of these so-called "findings", did it ever occur to them that someone just spilled some milk on it?
 
2012-12-13 01:07:50 PM
The Danes have the lowest levels of lactose intolerance in the world, with more than 9 in 10 able to digest lactose. The Chinese have the highest levels, with one in four people lactose intolerant. But guess who produces the most milk? China. Chinese milk production is bigger even than the USA, which you might expect to be number one given the American taste for ice cream, cheese, milk, yogurt, butter, etc.

Speaking of butter, it used to be preserved by burial in bogs. Butter has been found after a couple of centuries in Irish bogs and such places, and if not something you'd particularly want to eat, it has been remarkably preserved. Cheese even more ancient that that has been found. It is something you might eat on a dare but probably wouldn't enjoy much.

Clearly natural selection has been operating on dairy-based diets. The most likely reason is the role that milk plays in feeding children. If they Mother was unable to produce enough milk, the child would starve or perhaps be killed by disease before its immune system developed enough to handle other foods. A milk cow or at least a nanny goat was as much as necessity of life as an ax or a plow and more so.

Humans still consume the milk of cows, horses, sheep, goats, camels, yaks, and a number of other animals. There was an article recently about a Serbian tennis player who cornered the market in donkey milk cheese (pule) so his new restaurant would have a steady supply. It's incredibly expense.

All in all cheese and related dairy products are among greatest and most important inventions of all time. It's a pity that high tariffs and milk boards "protect" us from quality foreign cheese and that we eat so much "cheesy" flavoured stuff instead of the real thing.

When I was a student in Switzerland and France, even the supermarkets had enormous aisles of bread and cheese and sausages the way we have massive aisles of junk food, while their potato chip displays were as pathetic, hard to find, and expensive as displays of real bread in a crappy grocery store.

I love this stuff but so much of it goes to waste if I don't make an effort to avoid the fast and easy junk food snack and eat what I buy. I think Gresham's Law applies way beyond good and bad money. It's a fundamental law of the Universe. Bad food drives good food out of circulation, partly because it is cheap, partly because it is full of the things we crave naturally (starch, sugar, salt, fat, oil, etc.).

Where's the damn Nanny State when we need the biotch?
 
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