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(Popular Science)   Come watch a humanoid robot with lifelike bones and muscles stretch. All hail our buff robotic overlords   (popsci.com) divider line 24
    More: Interesting, humanoid robot, transhumanism, J. B., muscles, University of Tokyo  
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3022 clicks; posted to Geek » on 12 Dec 2012 at 9:30 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-12 09:27:58 AM
I bet this is in Japan and it is being made for the sex industry.
 
2012-12-12 09:36:39 AM

UberDave: I bet this is in Japan and it is being made for the sex industry.

The 'bot is 158 centimeters tall and weighs 50 kilograms, which makes it about the size of a 12-year-old Japanese boy,


Yes on both counts?

img4.sankakustatic.com
 
2012-12-12 09:57:59 AM
3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-12-12 10:03:05 AM
When do we get the full size models with real skin and bad breath?
 
2012-12-12 10:04:46 AM
Why? The election is over.
 
2012-12-12 10:05:03 AM
Testing Kenshiro's Penis Part.

Actually these do not look like the promising artificial muscles being developed in the late 90's which contracted when bathed in a chemical solution. Also - what's with the crappy walking? Does it implement hemorrhoids? I thought nearly all robots were up to Asimo and HOAP standards by now.
 
2012-12-12 10:08:36 AM
The potential for this development is fascinating. What I am curious about, however, is if they can master upright locomotion. I want to find out how quickly it wears out the pelvic/hip socket/femur area. As well as other areas that are under high stress from our method of walking. I've heard the science retort that our method of locomotion is extremely wasteful and illogical. I want to see that statement translated on an AI unit.

/I probably dont make sense
//need caffeine
 
2012-12-12 10:10:28 AM
I had a wind up snoopy toy in 1975 that walked a HELL of a lot better than that thing! What's the point of all this complex articulation if walks by hopping?
 
2012-12-12 10:13:20 AM

Anastacya: The potential for this development is fascinating. What I am curious about, however, is if they can master upright locomotion. I want to find out how quickly it wears out the pelvic/hip socket/femur area. As well as other areas that are under high stress from our method of walking. I've heard the science retort that our method of locomotion is extremely wasteful and illogical. I want to see that statement translated on an AI unit.

/I probably dont make sense
//need caffeine


It's only wasteful and illogical as seen by end-users. Production and management (sex and evolution) seem pretty satisfied.
 
2012-12-12 10:19:29 AM

Nurglitch: Anastacya: The potential for this development is fascinating. What I am curious about, however, is if they can master upright locomotion. I want to find out how quickly it wears out the pelvic/hip socket/femur area. As well as other areas that are under high stress from our method of walking. I've heard the science retort that our method of locomotion is extremely wasteful and illogical. I want to see that statement translated on an AI unit.

/I probably dont make sense
//need caffeine

It's only wasteful and illogical as seen by end-users. Production and management (sex and evolution) seem pretty satisfied.


We had to go through those stages to get to where we are (walking upright allowed us to see/hunt better, for example). It might be cool to pick over our evolutionary heritage to see what might make a better fit in the world that we've created, rather than the one we had to adapt to survive in.

Besides, if a robot would make a better personal assistant walking on all fours (or one with both "portrait" and "landscape" modes), or with its "head" located in the center of its "chest", or with 6 legs, or without the sense of smell - why wouldn't we build one like that?

// which leads me to another question - how come robots in movies can always be "killed" by removing/destroying the head?
// are robots always built to anatomically mimic humans? did not robot builder ever think "if I put the brain in the robot's crotch, it'll be INVINCIBLE!"?
 
2012-12-12 10:21:58 AM
I think we need a law that says robots can't look human...gotta be the C3P0 types.

except the sexbots.
 
2012-12-12 10:24:26 AM
I didn't ask for this!
 
2012-12-12 10:33:58 AM

Dr Dreidel: Nurglitch: Anastacya: The potential for this development is fascinating. What I am curious about, however, is if they can master upright locomotion. I want to find out how quickly it wears out the pelvic/hip socket/femur area. As well as other areas that are under high stress from our method of walking. I've heard the science retort that our method of locomotion is extremely wasteful and illogical. I want to see that statement translated on an AI unit.

/I probably dont make sense
//need caffeine

It's only wasteful and illogical as seen by end-users. Production and management (sex and evolution) seem pretty satisfied.

We had to go through those stages to get to where we are (walking upright allowed us to see/hunt better, for example). It might be cool to pick over our evolutionary heritage to see what might make a better fit in the world that we've created, rather than the one we had to adapt to survive in.

Besides, if a robot would make a better personal assistant walking on all fours (or one with both "portrait" and "landscape" modes), or with its "head" located in the center of its "chest", or with 6 legs, or without the sense of smell - why wouldn't we build one like that?

// which leads me to another question - how come robots in movies can always be "killed" by removing/destroying the head?
// are robots always built to anatomically mimic humans? did not robot builder ever think "if I put the brain in the robot's crotch, it'll be INVINCIBLE!"?


Probably because a powerful orgasm from their sex partner would cause a malfunction. Imagine a partner riding cowgirl, gets a bit too excited and comes down hard on the "goods", breaking the AI penis or ruining the power function.

And we all know that it would happen that way.
 
2012-12-12 10:38:40 AM
Cool, but let me know when they start building OmniMechs, then I'll get excited.
 
2012-12-12 10:54:22 AM
This has all happened before.
 
2012-12-12 10:59:15 AM

Anastacya: Probably because a powerful orgasm from their sex partner would cause a malfunction. Imagine a partner riding cowgirl, gets a bit too excited and comes down hard on the "goods", breaking the AI penis or ruining the power function.

And we all know that it would happen that way.


I'd imagine that any robot rated for sex could handle up to 200# of woman driving down on the crotch (the basis of which - the human pelvic area - is anatomically designed for such things). Even for your more full-figured women, steel has an annoying tendency toward rigidity (giggity). I don't doubt, though, that whatever our eventual sexbots look like, future fark.com will likely have an entire section dedicated to Sexbot Mishaps (call it the "Fark Farks" tab).

And anyway, I'm thinking more of warmechs or battle-type robots.

***The Incredibles SPOILER WARNING***
In The Incredibles, he beats the first Killbot by getting it to stab itself through the body many times, destroying the inner workings. This is good cinematic science. In almost all other movie applications of robots, you can beat them the same way you would a person - destroying the head, usually; and sometimes stabbing through the "heart".

You can stab a laptop 10 times and miss everything important, but it's also possible that you destroy only nonessential components (meaning it essentially still "works")...why is it not the same way for battle robots, who are designed to take that kind of punishment on the proving grounds before they even make production models?
 
2012-12-12 11:23:00 AM

Nurglitch: Anastacya: The potential for this development is fascinating. What I am curious about, however, is if they can master upright locomotion. I want to find out how quickly it wears out the pelvic/hip socket/femur area. As well as other areas that are under high stress from our method of walking. I've heard the science retort that our method of locomotion is extremely wasteful and illogical. I want to see that statement translated on an AI unit.

/I probably dont make sense
//need caffeine

It's only wasteful and illogical as seen by end-users. Production and management (sex and evolution) seem pretty satisfied.


We've got the most energy-efficient method of walking in the animal kingdom (over 40% efficient, better than any internal combustion engine); our upright posture allows autonomic or voluntary breathing in any attitude or gait, which gives us better running endurance than any other predator; our females are able to have widely spaced hips (which are just awesome) that permit our young to be born with larger, more-developed brains; and we've got free hands that can be used to wield tools.

Obviously those advantages have proven to be worth a little extra wear-and-tear.
 
2012-12-12 11:42:04 AM

Dr Dreidel: This is good cinematic science. In almost all other movie applications of robots, you can beat them the same way you would a person - destroying the head, usually; and sometimes stabbing through the "heart".


In movies, most humanoid robots have their sensory apparati in the head. Destroying the head would likely destroy or disable said apparati, reducing its ability to fight back or defend itself.

As far as media depictions of robots go, I like the ones from Ghost in the Shell's universe: redundant sensory apparati, located in various disparate positions on the external shell, with critical components staying inside a hardened case and subframe in the center mass. The humanoid robots don't work exactly the same way, but the ones without cyberbrains can get absolutely destroyed and still retain a semblance of functionality. More than one episode has featured interfacing with a mostly-destroyed intelligent machine.
 
2012-12-12 11:51:38 AM

grinding_journalist: In movies, most humanoid robots have their sensory apparati in the head. Destroying the head would likely destroy or disable said apparati, reducing its ability to fight back or defend itself.


But they'd still be able to move with that reduced capacity. In the movies (which are supposed to be real, dammit!), they just stop moving and making any sort of noise (you're telling me no servos are trying to spin, no gears are grinding, no HDD platters spinning - nothing?!?).

As far as media depictions of robots go, I like the ones from Ghost in the Shell's universe: redundant sensory apparati, located in various disparate positions on the external shell, with critical components staying inside a hardened case and subframe in the center mass. The humanoid robots don't work exactly the same way, but the ones without cyberbrains can get absolutely destroyed and still retain a semblance of functionality. More than one episode has featured interfacing with a mostly-destroyed intelligent machine.

And thus, a sci-fi writer is finally shown to have thought about robot design beyond "They look human, act human and die human. Problem?"

// maybe I should watch GitS (is that really the acronym you'd use?)
// I'm also thinking of Bishop from the Alien movies - dude had more involvement in the plot as a half-droid than as a crewmember
 
2012-12-12 01:06:42 PM
So it's already saluting Robot Hitler?
 
2012-12-12 01:18:40 PM
That is farking awesome... it never ceases to amaze me, some of the cool stuff we're doing now. I can't wait to see what applicatons this tech can be put to.
 
2012-12-12 02:14:31 PM

Dr Dreidel: // maybe I should watch GitS (is that really the acronym you'd use?)


Yes, it is, and it's on Netflix instant, along with "Stand Alone Complex" volumes 1 and 2, the most modern TV version. "Ghost in the Shell" was the anime featire film one based directly on the manga. Not sure of the sequel movie was, but really, any of it is good, so long as you start at the beginning of that particular movie/season of TV show.

It's like Sci-fi Tom Clancy, with a bit of Neuromancer thrown in. IMHO, it's one of the more realistic futurist views of the merger of man and machine.

/as an aside, ok, so now where's my mech? we have small enough nuclear reactors.
 
2012-12-12 10:46:59 PM
I wonder if you can install a custom ROM on one of those things.
 
2012-12-13 04:18:40 AM
It's so odd to see robots being built with the physical limitations of the human body.
 
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