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(Wired)   A separate 65-foot asteroid named 2012 XE54, discovered only a few days ago, made a close approach to Earth earlier this morning. NOT COOL   (wired.com) divider line 54
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10492 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Dec 2012 at 11:43 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-12 05:20:17 AM
seems like we are in the path of quite a swarm of of aster++++++++++++carrier lost+++++++++++
 
2012-12-12 06:14:17 AM
Why can't asteroid 2012 XE54 respect our personal space?
 
2012-12-12 06:59:27 AM

Bontesla: Why can't asteroid 2012 XE54 respect our personal space?


Pfft, look at a picture of the planet and it's obvious. Those swelt Van Allen belts, that oversized moon, all that satellite bling - Terra wants it, or it wouldn't act that way.

/aware that Luna acts to repel rather than attract asteroids
 
2012-12-12 09:33:47 AM
i522.photobucket.com
 
2012-12-12 09:36:01 AM
Do we have Bruce Willis on speed dial?
 
2012-12-12 10:31:20 AM

Sybarite: [i522.photobucket.com image 400x401]



You act like this was the only unmarked non-guided large rock out there likely to come close to us in the next 9 days.
 
2012-12-12 10:39:04 AM
3.7 million miles, or about 15 times the Earth-moon distance

I realize in the cosmic scheme of things that's close but it's nothing to wake up President Morgan Freeman over.
 
2012-12-12 10:53:38 AM
Actually yesterday but whatever.
 
2012-12-12 11:46:32 AM
a 65' rock? So by the time it reaches the surface it would be about the size of a chihuahua's head?
 
2012-12-12 11:47:31 AM
Meanwhile, the Bloop is still there.
 
2012-12-12 11:50:08 AM
A separate 65-foot asteroid named 2012 XE54, discovered only a few days ago, made a close approach to Earth earlier this morning. NOT COOL

FTFS.
 
2012-12-12 11:51:18 AM
We must never let this happen again. BURN DOWN THE OBSERVATORY!!!
 
2012-12-12 11:53:31 AM

badLogic: a 65' rock? So by the time it reaches the surface it would be about the size of a chihuahua's head?


Pretty much.
 
2012-12-12 11:53:46 AM

badLogic: a 65' rock? So by the time it reaches the surface it would be about the size of a chihuahua's head?


Or burn up entirely, a la shooting star?
 
2012-12-12 11:56:37 AM

Mugato: 3.7 million miles, or about 15 times the Earth-moon distance

I realize in the cosmic scheme of things that's close but it's nothing to wake up President Morgan Freeman over.


That was the 3-mile long asteroid (Toutatis). The 65-foot one (XE54) came within 230,000 km, or roughly a little more than half-way to the moon.
 
2012-12-12 11:59:10 AM
Holy crap it's the size of Jupiter 41:30
 
2012-12-12 11:59:23 AM

Mugato: Do we have Bruce Willis on speed dial?


You can keep Bruce Willis, I'll take Liv Tyler.
 
2012-12-12 12:03:03 PM
i50.tinypic.com

Ok, that was a bit of a boring video. Thankfully she popped up at the 1:48 mark.
 
2012-12-12 12:03:35 PM
I thought I saw something earlier. There's a billboard advert for Rush Limbaugh but I had already passed that.
 
2012-12-12 12:04:16 PM

CygnusDarius: Meanwhile, the Bloop is still there.


Actually, it was solved recently
 
2012-12-12 12:04:29 PM
and the launch of the air-force shuttle?

Ok, has anyone seen Bruce Willis, Steve Buscemi, or Ben Aflek?
 
2012-12-12 12:05:11 PM

Mugato: 3.7 million miles, or about 15 times the Earth-moon distance

I realize in the cosmic scheme of things that's close but it's nothing to wake up President Morgan Freeman over.


Especially when other close approaches come closer than our communication satellites. Sometimes much closer.

This JPL page is a good way to keep track of what's coming our way. At the moment there's nothing particularly exciting until 2040.
 
2012-12-12 12:07:56 PM
"Those ones? Those were the size of basketballs and Volkswagons."
 
2012-12-12 12:12:49 PM
I'd rather that thing hit the earth than

watch that video.
 
2012-12-12 12:13:05 PM

Tentacle: CygnusDarius: Meanwhile, the Bloop is still there.

Actually, it was solved recently


Really? *kicks can*
 
2012-12-12 12:19:18 PM
img526.imageshack.us
 
2012-12-12 12:23:44 PM
Will we have a closer one on 12-21? hmmmmm?!
 
2012-12-12 12:28:01 PM
A 65-foot asteroid? Oh noes! It might have looked cool in the atmosphere for a couple of seconds before it burned up completely!
 
2012-12-12 12:31:42 PM

Crackers Are a Family Food: A separate 65-foot asteroid named 2012 XE54, discovered only a few days ago, made a close approach to Earth earlier this morning. NOT COOL

FTFS.


Fixed That For Space.
 
2012-12-12 12:33:58 PM
At 65ft, 2012 XE54 would mostly vapourize in the atmosphere and likely detonate above the surface.

2012 DA14, due Feb 15 is 57m in diameter and will pass 0.09LD (lunar distances) from earth (Approx 25000km).

Infinately more likely to make a show for us.

Check out perdue.edu 's "Impact Earth" application. It lets you see impact effects.
 
2012-12-12 12:34:33 PM

Tentacle: CygnusDarius: Meanwhile, the Bloop is still there.

Actually, it was solved recently


What about the bleeps, the creeps and the sweeps?
 
2012-12-12 12:45:02 PM

Ivo Shandor: Mugato: 3.7 million miles, or about 15 times the Earth-moon distance

I realize in the cosmic scheme of things that's close but it's nothing to wake up President Morgan Freeman over.

Especially when other close approaches come closer than our communication satellites. Sometimes much closer.

This JPL page is a good way to keep track of what's coming our way. At the moment there's nothing particularly exciting until 2040.


That we know of. What's interesting is that NASA and other sources have said that if there WAS anything headed our way that we would have seen it months or years ago. Well... not necessarily. That statement assumes that "it" is traveling at normal orbital velocities. What about an interloper from outside the solar system, or even this galaxy? There is NO scientific reason why an interloper might not be traveling at a significant fraction of light-speed (say 10% or 20%, or even more) relative to our solar system. It might originate from a source with a different orbital direction. Or it might have been "whipped" (slingshot effect) by close approach to a really massive body which increased it's velocity relative to us. In this big big universe, it is naive in the extreme to assume that all celestial bodies are traveling at "about" the same speed as Earth. What would be the warning time for something like that?

A small chunk of rock traveling at 0.75 light speed would ruin our whole day. LOTS of kinetic energy there, enough to create a radiation effect even from just a chunk of iron.

Serious question, not a troll.
 
2012-12-12 12:48:03 PM
A 65 foot rock would explode as it entered the dense part of the atmosphere.

A 650 foot rock would probably make a neat little crater somewhere.

A 6500 foot rock would do some pretty major damage.
 
2012-12-12 12:59:53 PM

FuturePastNow: A 65 foot rock would explode as it entered the dense part of the atmosphere.

A 650 foot rock would probably make a neat little crater somewhere.

A 6500 foot rock would do some pretty major damage.


A handy rule of thumb is the crater depth would be the diameter of the meteor and crater diameter is ten x.

/roughly
 
2012-12-12 01:03:14 PM

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: Ivo Shandor: Mugato: 3.7 million miles, or about 15 times the Earth-moon distance

I realize in the cosmic scheme of things that's close but it's nothing to wake up President Morgan Freeman over.

Especially when other close approaches come closer than our communication satellites. Sometimes much closer.

This JPL page is a good way to keep track of what's coming our way. At the moment there's nothing particularly exciting until 2040.

That we know of. What's interesting is that NASA and other sources have said that if there WAS anything headed our way that we would have seen it months or years ago. Well... not necessarily. That statement assumes that "it" is traveling at normal orbital velocities. What about an interloper from outside the solar system, or even this galaxy? There is NO scientific reason why an interloper might not be traveling at a significant fraction of light-speed (say 10% or 20%, or even more) relative to our solar system. It might originate from a source with a different orbital direction. Or it might have been "whipped" (slingshot effect) by close approach to a really massive body which increased it's velocity relative to us. In this big big universe, it is naive in the extreme to assume that all celestial bodies are traveling at "about" the same speed as Earth. What would be the warning time for something like that?

A small chunk of rock traveling at 0.75 light speed would ruin our whole day. LOTS of kinetic energy there, enough to create a radiation effect even from just a chunk of iron.

Serious question, not a troll.


Not sure the answer, but I do know comets are a lot harder to detect, so a comet could also be headed towards us without us knowing.
 
2012-12-12 01:29:25 PM
Bill Bryson's excellent book, "A Short History of Nearly Everything", covers this topic quite well. I will try to jot down what I can remember off the top of my head.

Identifying an asteroid does not make it safe.
No one knows how many asteroids there are floating around out there. We don't know their paths, what sort of hours they keep, or what sort of interference could suddenly send them hurtling toward us. We can't even predict rock formations on our own planet. Put them adrift in space? Who knows what could happen?

Even a small asteroid, say, the size of a house could destroy a city. The one the killed the dinosaurs is thought to be about 6 miles wide. (for the record, the one that just flew by was about half that size).

Then he goes on to describe what would happen if an asteroid like the one that hit Manson Iowa were to hit today. That was a minor impact by the dinosaur extinction event. Not one single extinction occurred as a result. It did leave a crater 20 miles across and kille everything for 1000's of miles. Then the Earth's climate was effected because of the dust cloud for something like 10,000 years.


If we got hit like that again, we'd be screwed.
 
2012-12-12 01:32:13 PM
Jesus H. Christ can't I get a little more notice on these close calls? I want to make sure I get the important things done.

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-12-12 01:40:44 PM
To continue my story here. This is how Bryson describes what would happen if the Manson asteroid were to hit there today...

The asteroid wouldn't be visible at all until it hit the atmosphere, which would be roughly 1 second before it hit the Earth. The compressed air in front of it would heat up so quickly that everything in the asteroid's path would crumple like celophane in a flame. All the people in Manson, wo were just going about their business would be killed instantly. Anyone outside the death zone who happened to look in the right direection would see a huge black cloud followed by instantanious oblivion. The cloud would arrive eeriliy silently becase it would be moving much faster than the speed of sound.

Everything in the initial shockwave would be immediate ripped apart by the flying debris. For thousands of miles everything would be killed, flattened, or on fire.

And that's just the initial impact. The ensuing dust cloud would blot out the sun for an untold amount of time. Fleeing from the effects would only mean choosing a slow death over a quick one, because Earth's ability to support life would be universally diminished.


I'm sure I missd some stuff. But that's the basic gist.
 
2012-12-12 01:53:09 PM

durbnpoisn: To continue my story here. This is how Bryson describes what would happen if the Manson asteroid were to hit there today...

The asteroid wouldn't be visible at all until it hit the atmosphere, which would be roughly 1 second before it hit the Earth. The compressed air in front of it would heat up so quickly that everything in the asteroid's path would crumple like celophane in a flame. All the people in Manson, wo were just going about their business would be killed instantly. Anyone outside the death zone who happened to look in the right direection would see a huge black cloud followed by instantanious oblivion. The cloud would arrive eeriliy silently becase it would be moving much faster than the speed of sound.

Everything in the initial shockwave would be immediate ripped apart by the flying debris. For thousands of miles everything would be killed, flattened, or on fire.

And that's just the initial impact. The ensuing dust cloud would blot out the sun for an untold amount of time. Fleeing from the effects would only mean choosing a slow death over a quick one, because Earth's ability to support life would be universally diminished.


I'm sure I missd some stuff. But that's the basic gist.


Wow, thanks for cheering us up!
 
2012-12-12 01:56:25 PM

FuturePastNow: A 65 foot rock would explode as it entered the dense part of the atmosphere.

A 650 foot rock would probably make a neat little crater somewhere.

A 6500 foot rock would do some pretty major damage.


Meteor crater in Arizona was caused by a 200 foot rock. You are welcome to stand under the 65 foot rock that is going to explode in the atmosphere by your reasoning. I'd prefer not to.
 
2012-12-12 01:56:50 PM

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: A small chunk of rock traveling at 0.75 light speed would ruin our whole day. LOTS of kinetic energy there, enough to create a radiation effect even from just a chunk of iron.


A baseball at 0.9c would also be pretty destructive.
 
2012-12-12 02:03:50 PM

durbnpoisn: To continue my story here. This is how Bryson describes what would happen if the Manson asteroid were to hit there today...

The asteroid wouldn't be visible at all until it hit the atmosphere, which would be roughly 1 second before it hit the Earth. The compressed air in front of it would heat up so quickly that everything in the asteroid's path would crumple like celophane in a flame. All the people in Manson, wo were just going about their business would be killed instantly. Anyone outside the death zone who happened to look in the right direection would see a huge black cloud followed by instantanious oblivion. The cloud would arrive eeriliy silently becase it would be moving much faster than the speed of sound.

Everything in the initial shockwave would be immediate ripped apart by the flying debris. For thousands of miles everything would be killed, flattened, or on fire.

And that's just the initial impact. The ensuing dust cloud would blot out the sun for an untold amount of time. Fleeing from the effects would only mean choosing a slow death over a quick one, because Earth's ability to support life would be universally diminished.


I'm sure I missd some stuff. But that's the basic gist.


Hmmm....just to play Devil's Advocate here, weren't the Mayans fairly decent astronomers (given the tools they had)? I know they used Math. Were they, just maybe, able to chart out orbits of stuff? Did they see some asteroid make two approaches, the 2nd closer than the 1st, and extrapolate that the 3rd approach on 12/21/2012 would strike the Earth? Maybe not the End of the World for real, but to them it might have seemed that that would occur. Maybe (for real, for us with modern technology) just a good hard punch followed by several decades of misery, real short rations and no NFL Saturday nights? and . So maybe the survivalists hunkering in their bunkers might have the right idea.....

Might spell the end of the 3rd world, since (depending on where it hit) Europe, China and the US would clobber the rest with superior military tech (including nukes) to grab resources and land.
 
2012-12-12 02:04:42 PM

Fubegra: Just Another OC Homeless Guy: A small chunk of rock traveling at 0.75 light speed would ruin our whole day. LOTS of kinetic energy there, enough to create a radiation effect even from just a chunk of iron.

A baseball at 0.9c would also be pretty destructive.


Gunnery Chief: This, recruits, is a 20-kilo ferrous slug. Feel the weight. Every five seconds, the main gun of an Everest-class dreadnought accelerates one to 1.3 percent of light speed. It impacts with the force of a 38-kilotomb bomb. That is three times the yield of the city buster dropped on Hiroshima back on Earth. That means Sir Isaac Newton is the deadliest son-of-a-biatch in space. Now! Serviceman Burnside! What is Newton's First Law?

First Recruit: Sir! A object in motion stays in motion, sir!

Gunnery Chief: No credit for partial answers, maggot!

First Recruit: Sir! Unless acted on by an outside force, sir!

Gunnery Chief: Damn straight! I dare to assume you ignorant jackasses know that space is empty. Once you fire this husk of metal, it keeps going till it hits something. That can be a ship, or the planet behind that ship. It might go off into deep space and hit somebody else in ten thousand years. If you pull the trigger on this, you're ruining someone's day, somewhere and sometime. That is why you check your damn targets! That is why you wait for the computer to give you a damn firing solution! That is why, Serviceman Chung, we do not "eyeball it!" This is a weapon of mass destruction. You are not a cowboy shooting from the hip!

Second Recruit: Sir, yes sir!
 
2012-12-12 02:31:14 PM
Hmmm....just to play Devil's Advocate here, weren't the Mayans fairly decent astronomers (given the tools they had)? I know they used Math. Were they, just maybe, able to chart out orbits of stuff? Did they see some asteroid make two approaches, the 2nd closer than the 1st, and extrapolate that the 3rd approach on 12/21/2012 would strike the Earth? Maybe not the End of the World for real, but to them it might have seemed that that would occur. Maybe (for real, for us with modern technology) just a good hard punch followed by several decades of misery, real short rations and no NFL Saturday nights? and . So maybe the survivalists hunkering in their bunkers might have the right idea.....

The Mayans were pussies who used human body parts as playtoys for their children. Move along, nothing to see here.
 
2012-12-12 02:41:29 PM

Bontesla: Why can't asteroid 2012 XE54 respect our personal space?


What we need is some asteroid control. If the solar system didn't have asteroids, the dinosaurs would be alive today.
 
2012-12-12 02:49:13 PM

cgraves67: We must never let this happen again. BURN DOWN THE OBSERVATORY!!!


Sorry, but this is the funniest comment I've read in weeks. Bravo.
 
2012-12-12 03:03:17 PM
weknowmemes.com
 
2012-12-12 03:06:50 PM

8 inches: cgraves67: We must never let this happen again. BURN DOWN THE OBSERVATORY!!!

Sorry, but this is the funniest comment I've read in weeks. Bravo.


I can't take credit. It's the end of a Simpson's episode.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bart's_Comet
 
2012-12-12 03:40:47 PM
Potato.
 
2012-12-12 04:30:36 PM
The asteroid that blew up over in Russia was guesstimated to be about 330 ft.

Tunguska_event
 
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