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(Yahoo)   There is more to moving at supersonic speeds than just using jet-fuel, as these New Jersey motorists are about to find out   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 60
    More: Fail, supersonic speed, New Jersey, fuel pump, jet fuel, aviation fuel, Ugh!, underground storage tanks, motorists  
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11489 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Dec 2012 at 3:20 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-11 08:43:55 PM

cretinbob: SirTanon: It's okay, I drive one of these:

[www.instablogsimages.com image 394x261]

That's actually funny. I used to have a diesel Rabbit and after fueling up one day I went in to pay and the nice young lady behind the counter stared at me wide eyed and said "You just put diesel in that!?!"
to which I smiled and politely replied " I hope so".

Yes it's a really shiatty article and the answers range from "So what?" to "So what, drain the tank."


SwiftFox: I thought it was diesel fuel being refined fuel oil and jet fuel being refined kerosene?

It all comes from crude oil. You get different sized molecules to turn to vapor at different temperatures. The length of the molecule determines the characteristics of the final product.

simplified, but not over simplified

[www.setlaboratories.com image 600x458]


I find that chart hard to believe. Oil is just a blip on the radar of civilization. We will replace it with rainbows, 3D printers and orbital solar arrays.
 
2012-12-11 08:58:49 PM

LoneVVolf: MythDragon: ChipNASA: JP-7?

[upload.wikimedia.org image 300x235]

There is something awefully farking scary about using the same liquid that you use for fuel as your coolant.

I'd be more concerned about the fuel/coolant pouring out of gaping holes in the fuselage while the aircraft taxis down the runway. That thing leaks like a sieve until it heats up.


I always wondered what the EPA would think of that.
 
2012-12-11 09:31:44 PM

coffee smells good: ShamanGator: Brother in law had an old Nova we BUILT back in the very early 80's. He liked power & had a good disposable income at the time. He was working at a plane shop at the time & would run 130 octane ave gas on the weekends. Scary power & lots of fun.


CSB, sort of...


You do know octane has nothing to do with the amount of energy in the fuel don't you?


He might. But octane IS a measure of resistance to preignition, and if the engine has insane levels of compression for maximum power, then that kind of fuel might allow advancing timing to "you've gone completely insane" levels, which would indeed result in a real screamer.

But even super enriched octane fuels for racing tend to be in the 108-110 level or thereabouts (if I remember right), so 130 would just be plain overkill.

cretinbob: simplified, but not over simplified


That's a neat pic. I know bugger-all about refining crude, but I did have a general idea about some of the resulting fuels.

MythDragon: I always wondered what the EPA would think of that.


They were likely never asked or told to fark off. National security has been held to trump environmental or employee health concerns.
 
2012-12-11 09:53:14 PM

MythDragon: LoneVVolf: MythDragon: ChipNASA: JP-7?

[upload.wikimedia.org image 300x235]

There is something awefully farking scary about using the same liquid that you use for fuel as your coolant.

I'd be more concerned about the fuel/coolant pouring out of gaping holes in the fuselage while the aircraft taxis down the runway. That thing leaks like a sieve until it heats up.

I always wondered what the EPA would think of that.


SR-71s get special exemptions from everyone, everywhere, all the time. Simply because they are that awesome.

/no really
//they are
 
2012-12-11 11:47:26 PM

netringer: It's a bit worse when they pump auto fuel (or Av gas) into jet planes.

Kinda hard to pull over and call for a tow when climbing through 3000 feet.


Turbine engines run just fine using 100LL and even auto-gas. You are just limited to the number of hours you can operate while using Mo-gas or Av-gas and the inspection interval is decreased.

In an non-certified engine, you can do whatever. I knew a guy in Texas who ran an F-86 and T-33 while using Jet-A cut 50% with Mo-gas to save on cost.
 
2012-12-12 01:16:47 AM
A friend of mine used to run his junk Skoda diesel pickup on waterlogged A1 discarded from our jumpship and fuel tank. It took 30 seconds to start, but ran fine.
Now that we've changed airplanes (the turbine had more and more problems, and got too expensive to run), 100LL is our new thing. Someone stole about 2 cubic meters of the stuff a few months ago, I hope it rots their catalytic converters :(
 
2012-12-12 10:20:17 AM
Frank Dooley: [panting] Listen... I'm only gonna say this once. I'm a special officer. You have to get me to the corner of 83rd and Aviation in 10 minutes... otherwise, two wonderful people that I know are gonna die.
The Cowboy: Well, climb on in here, Slim.
Frank Dooley: [enters the truck's cab] Whew! Thank you.
The Cowboy: Well, let's just see how fast this son-of-a-biatch'll go!
[the psycho Cowboy truck driver starts up the tanker truck and suddenly begins slaming into all the parked cars in the traffic jam!]
The Cowboy: Hold on tight to your saddle horn, son!
Frank Dooley: So what are you hauling?
The Cowboy: Rocket Fuel!

Might be obscure
 
2012-12-12 02:09:59 PM

maxheck: netringer:

It's a bit worse when they pump auto fuel (or Av gas) into jet planes.

Kinda hard to pull over and call for a tow when climbing through 3000 feet.

I'm just guessing here, but given that regular gasoline is quite a lot more volatile than jet fuel...

"Kinda hard to pull over and call for a tow when engulfed in a fireball.

/ ok, maybe not *quite* that bad, but...


I'm a little late here, but, turbine engines (at least like that in the CRJ for instance) can be rated to run on regular aviation fuel (pretty much just fancy gasoline) for limited periods in case of emergency (stuck in BFE for some reason with no access to Jet fuel), but this isn't good on the engines as they don't get the benefit of the lubricating properties of jet fuel (equivalent of kerosene). So they wouldn't really explode. My understanding is that turbines are pretty tolerant to run on just about anything that is flammable.

The article is ambiguous as to whether this was Jet fuel or regular aviation fuel...jet fuel would be like putting diesel in your car and wouldn't work, but avgas would run ok until the lead plugs up your catalytic convertor. My guess is jet fuel since avgas is produced in fairly tiny quantities (I once heard that avgas comprises less than 1% of gasoline production in the US.)
 
2012-12-12 04:51:59 PM
Sweet. JET-A in a Jetta..
 
2012-12-12 10:02:13 PM

St_Francis_P: See now, if they had diesels everything would have been fine.


Mostly. Diesels can run Jet-A but you should probably put some 2-stroke oil in with the tank.
 
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