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(The Atlantic Wire)   The worst typos and best corrections of 2012, Including this gem from the NYTImes: "this article incorrectly described imagery from The Shining. The gentleman seen with the weird guy in the bear suit is wearing a tuxedo, but not a top hat"   (theatlanticwire.com) divider line 49
    More: Amusing, NYT, CBSNewYork, gentleman seen  
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8413 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Dec 2012 at 1:56 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-11 02:00:27 PM
For me, that was, by far, the weirdest part of that movie.
 
2012-12-11 02:01:32 PM
....just when I managed to loose five pounds from my butt.

/stupid men world
 
2012-12-11 02:04:09 PM
"...butt cracks appeared..."

Indeed.
 
2012-12-11 02:04:17 PM
Pretty sure it was a dog costume.
 
2012-12-11 02:04:27 PM
Bloobmerg

Really thought that said Boobmerg.
 
2012-12-11 02:04:35 PM
Wait, why is the bear weird? For all we know it was the other guy's idea.

And how do you know it was a guy in the bear costume?
 
2012-12-11 02:06:51 PM

PanicMan: Wait, why is the bear weird? For all we know it was the other guy's idea.

And how do you know it was a guy in the bear costume?


Maybe it was a bear in a person suit in a bear suit.

// bwoooooooooooooooooonnnnnnnnnnnng
 
2012-12-11 02:07:11 PM

Nurglitch: Pretty sure it was a dog costume.


Ditto. He looked like John Candy in Spaceballs.
 
2012-12-11 02:10:29 PM

CatfoodSpork: For me, that was, by far, the weirdest part of that movie.


For everyone I think. Even my son when he saw it recently for the first time, was weirded out by a lot in the movie, (not the least of which was Sissy Spacek's obvious thyriod problem {the bulging eyes}) but afterwards his Weeners was "WTF was that part with the guy in the dog suit about?"

but honestly what has the Great Grey Lady come to that the phrase "the wierd guy in the bear suit" made it into print?
 
2012-12-11 02:10:48 PM
I guess the Times couldn't mention that the "Weird Guy in a Bear Suit" was actually a "Weird Guy in a Dog Suit fellating another guy in a tuxedo."
 
2012-12-11 02:10:50 PM
www.muppetcentral.com

grizzlybomb.com

Separated at birth?
 
2012-12-11 02:11:16 PM
How about his minor correction in the NYT:

"
Because of an editing error, an article last Saturday about Israel's decision to move forward with planning and zoning for settlements in an area east of Jerusalem known as E1 described imprecisely the effect of such development on access to the cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem from Jerusalem. While development of E1 would limit access to Ramallah and Bethlehem to narrow corridors far from the Old City and downtown Jerusalem, it would not completely separate those cities from Jerusalem."


http://www.camera.org/index.asp?x_context=2&x_outlet=35&x_article=235 7

Yup, no bias there at all.....
 
2012-12-11 02:12:02 PM
img294.imageshack.us
 
2012-12-11 02:20:18 PM
imageshack.us
 
2012-12-11 02:25:09 PM
#1: ERMAHGERD! CORRERCTION!
 
2012-12-11 02:25:34 PM
cdn.theatlanticwire.com

So meta.
 
2012-12-11 02:29:41 PM
"Bear Farker, do you need assistance?"
 
2012-12-11 02:34:05 PM

Nurglitch: Pretty sure it was a dog costume.


From the Script: Driven to madness herself, Wendy rushes upstairs looking for Danny. She hears echoes of chanting. Through one of the hotel room's open bedroom doors, she catches a disturbing glimpse of a sexually perverse scene from the hotel's sordid past - another piece of evidence proving the entire family's possession of the 'shining' phenomenon. A man in a dog outfit (with a open bottom) that masks his face, possibly a guest who has wandered up from one of the hotel's ancient costume balls, is stretched out over a formally-dressed male lover on a bed. The decadent sex act of the participants is interrupted - they look up and stare back at Wendy.

I never gave it much thought, or considered if it was a man or woman in the costume.

Googling 'dog ear costume', and 'bear ear costume', the round above the head ears seem to be more associated with bears. Dog ears would be floppy (see above Ralph comparison), or pointed like a doberman.
 
2012-12-11 02:37:05 PM
It was a dog costume. There is a matching character in the book.
 
2012-12-11 02:50:04 PM
Hello chaps. You know what I think would be rather droll? If we all sat down and looked at some etchings.
 
2012-12-11 02:55:08 PM

Good Behavior Day: [www.muppetcentral.com image 200x150]

[grizzlybomb.com image 500x313]

Separated at birth?


Dr. Soong created him first.
 
2012-12-11 02:58:17 PM

Magorn: Sissy Spacek's obvious thyriod problem


Shelley Duvall not Sissy Spacek. But yeah, those eyes were creepy.
 
2012-12-11 03:01:48 PM

Magorn: CatfoodSpork: For me, that was, by far, the weirdest part of that movie.

For everyone I think. Even my son when he saw it recently for the first time, was weirded out by a lot in the movie, (not the least of which was Sissy Spacek's obvious thyriod problem {the bulging eyes}) but afterwards his Weeners was "WTF was that part with the guy in the dog suit about?"

but honestly what has the Great Grey Lady come to that the phrase "the wierd guy in the bear suit" made it into print?


sissy spacek? i'm sure you're thinking of shelley duvall.
 
2012-12-11 03:03:07 PM

HailRobonia: [img294.imageshack.us image 750x600]


It made more sense in the book... really, it did.
 
2012-12-11 03:07:16 PM
The differences between the two above photos are rather minor but unmistakable. Makes me curious.
 
2012-12-11 03:39:06 PM
I think my favorite correction is also due to the NY times:

An item in the Extra Bases baseball notebook last Sunday misidentified, in some editions, the origin of the name Orcrist the Goblin Cleaver, which Mets pitcher R. A. Dickey gave one of his bats. Orcrist was not, as Dickey had said, the name of the sword used by Bilbo Baggins in the Misty Mountains in "The Hobbit"; Orcrist was the sword used by the dwarf Thorin Oakenshield in the book. (Bilbo Baggins's sword was called Sting.)
 
2012-12-11 03:45:47 PM

Pangea: The differences between the two above photos are rather minor but unmistakable. Makes me curious.


One is anamorphic (stretched for DVD), one isn't. Any minor differences might be from digital changes that studios insist on making, to keep people buying.
 
2012-12-11 03:52:50 PM
I just think it's funny that anagrams for New York Times include Enormity Skew and Monkeys Write
 
2012-12-11 03:56:28 PM

evaned: I think my favorite correction is also due to the NY times:

An item in the Extra Bases baseball notebook last Sunday misidentified, in some editions, the origin of the name Orcrist the Goblin Cleaver, which Mets pitcher R. A. Dickey gave one of his bats. Orcrist was not, as Dickey had said, the name of the sword used by Bilbo Baggins in the Misty Mountains in "The Hobbit"; Orcrist was the sword used by the dwarf Thorin Oakenshield in the book. (Bilbo Baggins's sword was called Sting.)


It's a good thing baseball fans and Lord of the Rings fans are never the same people.
*waits*
 
2012-12-11 03:59:22 PM

foxyshadis: Pangea: The differences between the two above photos are rather minor but unmistakable. Makes me curious.

One is anamorphic (stretched for DVD), one isn't. Any minor differences might be from digital changes that studios insist on making, to keep people buying.


But...the eyes?
 
2012-12-11 04:06:06 PM
s3-ec.buzzfed.com

/hot
 
2012-12-11 04:06:51 PM

Pangea: The differences between the two above photos are rather minor but unmistakable. Makes me curious.


I'm not seeing the differences, at least no differences that can't be explained by a different frame being captured, or cropping. The top of the second photo is closer to the top of the lamp, hence the apparent disappearance of the photo, though the frame can still be made out.

Ok, they eyes seem to have closed slightly on the dog mask. The I-Phone below the lamp is a doubly surprising anachronism.
 
2012-12-11 04:21:12 PM
He keeps saying 'spelled wrong', 'painted wrong'.

If he's going to call out others, he should say 'spelled incorrectly' or 'wrongly spelled'.

/ Meta Meta?
// Nazi
 
2012-12-11 04:31:36 PM

GlobalStrategic MapleSyrup Reserve: evaned: I think my favorite correction is also due to the NY times:

An item in the Extra Bases baseball notebook last Sunday misidentified, in some editions, the origin of the name Orcrist the Goblin Cleaver, which Mets pitcher R. A. Dickey gave one of his bats. Orcrist was not, as Dickey had said, the name of the sword used by Bilbo Baggins in the Misty Mountains in "The Hobbit"; Orcrist was the sword used by the dwarf Thorin Oakenshield in the book. (Bilbo Baggins's sword was called Sting.)

It's a good thing baseball fans and Lord of the Rings fans are never the same people.
*waits*


Geddy Lee frowns on your shillelagh
 
2012-12-11 04:39:54 PM
I still have, from the late 70s, a newspaper clipping from my hometown paper that says, "Boston superstar John Havlicek put in a shiat from the corner."
In those pre-computer days, it was quite a funny/unusual thing to see. Also, being a teen boy helped.
 
2012-12-11 04:41:08 PM

Hobber: He keeps saying 'spelled wrong', 'painted wrong'.

If he's going to call out others, he should say 'spelled incorrectly' or 'wrongly spelled'.

/ Meta Meta?
// Nazi


Glass houses.

The OED has several definitions for an adverbial form of "wrong". The first definition begins its etymology at 1330: "He sailed al day, & on þe nyght, Vmwhile boþe wrong & ryught, Til he com in-til an ilde." Here's one from 1572: "He winked wrong, and so let slippe the [bow-]string, Which cast him wide"

Or from a slightly different definition (pointing to "wrongfully", and with citations dating to circa 1200), one from 1848: "In spite of her care and assiduity she guessed wrong."

Or from another slightly different definition (with citations dating to circa 1200), one from 1787: "They will amend it whenever they find it works wrong."

This isn't even a "modern usage allows it" sort of thing; this is a "'wrong' has been an adverb for centuries" thing.
 
2012-12-11 04:43:28 PM

Mateorocks: It was a dog costume. There is a matching character in the book.


This. And that's not a typo; it's poor research and crappy fact-checking.

/Used to have a humor site with a feature called "Corection." One was "A transcription error in last week's "Comin' Down the Pike" column might have had unfortunate results. We meant to say you should castigate your congressman. We regret the error."
 
2012-12-11 04:50:12 PM
IMPORTANT NOTICE! If you are one of the many parachuting enthusiasts
who bought our Easy Sky Diving book, please make the following correction:
On page 8, line 7, the words "state zip code" should read "pull rip cord."
 
2012-12-11 05:53:01 PM

TheGogmagog: Pangea: The differences between the two above photos are rather minor but unmistakable. Makes me curious.

I'm not seeing the differences, at least no differences that can't be explained by a different frame being captured, or cropping. The top of the second photo is closer to the top of the lamp, hence the apparent disappearance of the photo, though the frame can still be made out.

Ok, they eyes seem to have closed slightly on the dog mask. The I-Phone below the lamp is a doubly surprising anachronism.


Looks like a TV remote to me. Like I said, the eyes are probably the studio screwing around with the print, assuming it's not anon trying to make the picture more "shocking." The closed eyes are the ones I remember from the movie.
 
2012-12-11 06:14:15 PM

foxyshadis: Like I said, the eyes are probably the studio screwing around with the print


The eyes just looked really blue to me in the first image but it's probably just the timing of the shot. Thanks for the input.
 
2012-12-11 07:22:29 PM
There was one a few years back, in a pretty major paper (WaPo? NYT?) something like 'Correction, the rap group Public Enemy's song '911 is a Joke' refers to the emergency response service and not to September 11. We regret the error'
 
2012-12-11 07:32:56 PM

foxyshadis: Pangea: The differences between the two above photos are rather minor but unmistakable. Makes me curious.

One is anamorphic (stretched for DVD), one isn't. Any minor differences might be from digital changes that studios insist on making, to keep people buying.


Also, one is bigger...

// Bigamorphic?
 
2012-12-11 07:58:06 PM

TheMysticS: GlobalStrategic MapleSyrup Reserve: evaned: I think my favorite correction is also due to the NY times:

An item in the Extra Bases baseball notebook last Sunday misidentified, in some editions, the origin of the name Orcrist the Goblin Cleaver, which Mets pitcher R. A. Dickey gave one of his bats. Orcrist was not, as Dickey had said, the name of the sword used by Bilbo Baggins in the Misty Mountains in "The Hobbit"; Orcrist was the sword used by the dwarf Thorin Oakenshield in the book. (Bilbo Baggins's sword was called Sting.)

It's a good thing baseball fans and Lord of the Rings fans are never the same people.
*waits*

Geddy Lee frowns on your shillelagh


What a shillelagh might look like:

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-12-12 12:33:16 AM
i.chzbgr.com

i.huffpost.com

tellemworldwide.files.wordpress.com

media-cache-ec6.pinterest.com

2.bp.blogspot.com

languageandgrammar.files.wordpress.com

cdn.lolcaption.com 

i.huffpost.com
 
2012-12-12 12:36:56 AM
www.hilariousheadlines.com

static.someecards.com
 
2012-12-12 12:46:32 AM
3.bp.blogspot.com

i.chzbgr.com

thatschurch.com

files.myopera.com

www.angryblacklady.com
 
2012-12-12 12:58:10 AM

Klom Dark: TheMysticS: GlobalStrategic MapleSyrup Reserve: evaned: I think my favorite correction is also due to the NY times:

An item in the Extra Bases baseball notebook last Sunday misidentified, in some editions, the origin of the name Orcrist the Goblin Cleaver, which Mets pitcher R. A. Dickey gave one of his bats. Orcrist was not, as Dickey had said, the name of the sword used by Bilbo Baggins in the Misty Mountains in "The Hobbit"; Orcrist was the sword used by the dwarf Thorin Oakenshield in the book. (Bilbo Baggins's sword was called Sting.)

It's a good thing baseball fans and Lord of the Rings fans are never the same people.
*waits*

Geddy Lee frowns on your shillelagh

What a shillelagh might look like:


I was hoping you'd have posted a baseball bat, but it was an informative picture, anyway-
 
2012-12-12 03:55:01 AM
I'm a journalist who reports on healthcare. I have investigated many a pubic hospital.
 
2012-12-12 05:27:02 AM
This story and thread has maid my day. God bless teh righters, and all ewe Farkers for potting sew mini blunders. Their are sertainly alo tof laughs too bee had hear.
 
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