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(Time)   Childhood obesity now said to be caused by *shakes Magic 8 ball* too much salt   (healthland.time.com) divider line 4
    More: PSA, magic, childhood obesity, fruit juices, salts  
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1872 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Dec 2012 at 6:18 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-11 07:13:49 AM
1 votes:

LonMead: FeedTheCollapse: Subby: *shakes Magic 8 ball*


this implies the outcome is random. Kids getting fat by too much salt seems fairly logical.

Check back next week for the NEW reason for childhood obesity.


i blame scales. for allowing weights up to 300 lbs. there should be a cut off at 250. and anything above they display "too fat" and will call 911 emergency services. to put them in a prison camp to lose weight
2012-12-11 06:56:41 AM
1 votes:

log_jammin: stuhayes2010: No, too much Xbox. We ate crap as children. But we ran outside, ran inside, never sat down.

Video games have been around a lot longer than XBOX.


lol, you ever try to play pong for 4 hours a day? Shiat is fun, but nowhere near as fun as building tire forts or making bows and arrows out of sticks and balloons and chasing friends around. Blades of Steel was amazing, but still nowhere near as fun as actually playing street hockey.
2012-12-11 01:18:50 AM
1 votes:

fusillade762: DON.MAC: A common trick. If you want people to buy beer, give them salty snacks.

So we should be giving our kids beer?


Why not? It keeps them quiet. When was the last time you saw a five year old mean drunk?
2012-12-11 12:02:10 AM
1 votes:
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