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(Business Insider)   Urban Outfitters comes up with a new (and brilliant) way to separate hipster douches from their money   (businessinsider.com) divider line 177
    More: Cool, polos, trespassing, markup, designer labels  
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33010 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Dec 2012 at 11:40 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



177 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-12-10 08:45:08 PM  
vintage

Ah, 2012, an excellent year for hosing hipsters.
 
2012-12-10 08:46:33 PM  
All goods are worth what people are willing to pay for them.

Inflation is the child of idiots.
 
2012-12-10 09:53:02 PM  
We interviewed a "vintage seller" at the Artists & Fleas market in Williamsburg, Brooklyn about how he got his merchandise.

He was selling vintage Lacoste and Polo sweaters for $45.

"Basically I just go to Texas once a year, go to the Goodwill store in a nice suburban neighborhood, and load up on stuff that just costs a few dollars," he said. "Then I come here and people go crazy for it."


wait until brooklyn hipsters find out they are wearing the rejected garments of texan suburbanites.
 
2012-12-10 10:15:34 PM  
Wait until they find out about the thrift stores? They are having a massive sale with those great prices.
 
2012-12-10 10:51:35 PM  
Allow me to say, HA HA HA HA HA HA HA
 
2012-12-10 10:53:06 PM  

Makh: Wait until they find out about the thrift stores? They are having a massive sale with those great prices.


No, no, no. Thrift stores are for the common, the mainstream, and the terminally unhip. The cool and ironic individual buys their used clothing at a massive markup at a cool and ironic place with a cool and ironic name like Artists and Fleas. It is also cool and ironic to wear sweaters discarded by Texan suburbanites who obviously are not worthy of this cool and ironic clothing, else they wouldn't have sold them at a yard sale.
 
2012-12-10 11:21:46 PM  
I don't generally shop at Urban Outfitters but I'm okay with this. I hate taking the time in Goodwill/Salvation Army/Random thrift store and sorting through all the clothes attempting to find something I like, in my size, and also in wearable condition. I want to walk in, maybe do quick browse (15 minutes, tops) and leave. Preferably without needing to try on clothes as well. I hate clothes shopping.
 
2012-12-10 11:27:55 PM  
It's worth it to not have to deal with the poor people at Goodwill.
 
2012-12-10 11:42:36 PM  
Hipster claiming there's no such thing as hipsters in 3...2...1...
 
2012-12-10 11:43:27 PM  
Same thing as the 'holes in jeans' thing right?
 
2012-12-10 11:43:59 PM  
Selling old clothes as "vintage" is wrong and new?

How?
 
2012-12-10 11:44:10 PM  
upload.wikimedia.org

Approves
 
2012-12-10 11:44:31 PM  
vintage stores are nothing new. they charge about 10x as much as thrift stores, they generally pay for used clothes and dont just take whatever you have. there was a farging episode of seinfeld about this, thats how not news this is
 
2012-12-10 11:45:51 PM  
"Our One-Of-A-Kind Vintage collection is a curated selection of vintage items that our buyers have found throughout their travels from various cities and locations."

Oh, I'll bet they curate the crap out of it. "Vinnie! Cut open that new bale of clothes that just got dumped on the loading dock."
 
2012-12-10 11:46:07 PM  

Abox: Hipster claiming there's no such thing as hipsters in 3...2...1...


just a smarmier synonym for douche or asshole.
 
2012-12-10 11:46:46 PM  

SlothB77: wait until brooklyn hipsters find out they are wearing the rejected garments of texan suburbanites.


If anything, they'll revel in the irony of it all.
 
2012-12-10 11:48:23 PM  
*shrug* It's kind of like a Stupid Tax. Like the lottery, but über hip.
 
2012-12-10 11:48:26 PM  
Also, Thrift Shop. (NSFW lyrics)
 
2012-12-10 11:50:14 PM  

Abox: Hipster claiming there's no such thing as hipsters in 3...2...1...


Dude. I live in Portland. Hipsters exist, I know many and probably would be called one by most of Fark. I just don't know any who shop at Urban Outfitters.
 
2012-12-10 11:51:20 PM  
"Our One-Of-A-Kind Vintage collection is a curated..."

OK, I can now totally hate this. Choosing crap not curating.

/ Brother is an actual curator
// Of museum items you have likely gazed upon
 
2012-12-10 11:51:32 PM  

Abox: Hipster claiming there's no such thing as hipsters in 3...2...1...


Let me head off that bullshiat by giving an easy definition of a hipster that does not include mention of specific items of clothing or objects they carry:

A hipster can be defined by liking things for ironic purposes only. Value in their eyes is determined by liking things because they are "lame" or "square" or "uncool." Obscurity helps. Step 2 is defining an ingroup of other people that like things in an ironic fashion. Not to embrace kitsch or retro on its own merits. Thus the circle is squared.
 
2012-12-10 11:52:32 PM  
I'm fairly sure that anyone shopping at Urban Outfitter would be considered a poser at best, not a hipster.
 
2012-12-10 11:52:39 PM  
And I sit back and wonder how China got all of the US' money?

/LOLs
 
2012-12-10 11:53:13 PM  
Hipsters that buy that crap at Urban Outfitters are paying an order of magnitude higher price to have someone pick it for them out of a thrift shop.

Like buying a stoner T-shirt at Haight & Ashbury.
 
2012-12-10 11:54:10 PM  

Fano: Abox: Hipster claiming there's no such thing as hipsters in 3...2...1...

Let me head off that bullshiat by giving an easy definition of a hipster that does not include mention of specific items of clothing or objects they carry:

A hipster can be defined by liking things for ironic purposes only. Value in their eyes is determined by liking things because they are "lame" or "square" or "uncool." Obscurity helps. Step 2 is defining an ingroup of other people that like things in an ironic fashion. Not to embrace kitsch or retro on its own merits. Thus the circle is squared.


But they have to like the SAME things, right? Or are the hipster friends expected to each have mutually-exclusive interests?

/We need anthropologists to study this question.
 
2012-12-10 11:55:25 PM  
It IS WORTH $50..... they went out and picked through all kinds of shiat to find it. People who think they should be able to purchase things at wholesale bother me. There is a cost associated with finding the stuff and shipping it, etc...

That being said, if you are such a loser that you can't go to ACTUAL yardsales to by your shiat and instead hit UO because you have no actual knowledge of style....... well then, you are a douchebag.
 
2012-12-10 11:55:37 PM  
I just never throw away any of my old clothes. Most of them are vintage by now. Sometimes they literally fall apart and that's when I know I should throw them away
 
2012-12-10 11:56:52 PM  

skylabdown: It IS WORTH $50..... they went out and picked through all kinds of shiat to find it. People who think they should be able to purchase things at wholesale bother me. There is a cost associated with finding the stuff and shipping it, etc...

That being said, if you are such a loser that you can't go to ACTUAL yardsales to by your shiat and instead hit UO because you have no actual knowledge of style....... well then, you are a douchebag.


You are a douchebag for calling it "UO".

/We all know you shop there.
 
2012-12-10 11:57:40 PM  

Happy Hours: I just never throw away any of my old clothes. Most of them are vintage by now. Sometimes they literally fall apart and that's when I know I should throw them away


You sound old.
 
2012-12-11 12:00:03 AM  

JohnAnnArbor: Fano: Abox: Hipster claiming there's no such thing as hipsters in 3...2...1...

Let me head off that bullshiat by giving an easy definition of a hipster that does not include mention of specific items of clothing or objects they carry:

A hipster can be defined by liking things for ironic purposes only. Value in their eyes is determined by liking things because they are "lame" or "square" or "uncool." Obscurity helps. Step 2 is defining an ingroup of other people that like things in an ironic fashion. Not to embrace kitsch or retro on its own merits. Thus the circle is squared.

But they have to like the SAME things, right? Or are the hipster friends expected to each have mutually-exclusive interests?

/We need anthropologists to study this question.


Hipster is like twins, it usually skips a generation.

Person 1 likes a new band and is a hipster because the new band is obscure. You probably haven't heard of them.
Person 2 starts liking the band, is a poser. Person 1 liked that band before they sold out.
Person 3 starts liking the band and is a hipster because they are ironically liking a band that only posers like.
 
2012-12-11 12:03:59 AM  

Heamer: Also, Thrift Shop. (NSFW lyrics)


This is my new favorite track.

/can't wait for the dubstep remix
//not sure if being ironic
 
2012-12-11 12:04:28 AM  
There was a Simpsons/Portlandia crossover episode last night, Springfield was invaded by hipsters.

/can I donate clothes to Goodwill that I bought at Goodwill?
 
2012-12-11 12:08:22 AM  

CruJones: There was a Simpsons/Portlandia crossover episode last night, Springfield was invaded by hipsters.

/can I donate clothes to Goodwill that I bought at Goodwill?


No. It creates a black hole where all the mass of all the hipness condences into a point of ironic singularity so dense that eventually we will all be swallowed by smug.
 
2012-12-11 12:08:48 AM  

TofuTheAlmighty: I'm fairly sure that anyone shopping at Urban Outfitter would be considered a poser at best, not a hipster.


Calculation: Most likely result. Much like Gap Brand Grunge Clothing in the 90s. Query: How can one buy cast off clothing for severe markup and be considered "knowledgable?"
 
2012-12-11 12:08:59 AM  
/looks down at attire

//doggone...I'm a hipster
 
2012-12-11 12:09:28 AM  
Is it ridiculous to pay $50 for something you could buy for $5? Yes.

Is it ridiculous to not sell something for $50 wen you bought it for $5, if some idiot didn't read the first Q&A? Yes.
 
2012-12-11 12:12:41 AM  
And hipsters shell out the money regardless. It's no different in Florida, I know someone who buys jeans from Bealls Outlet, fades them and adds a few decorations from a kit she bought from walmart. I don't recall the name of the kit she buys, but she adds some fake plastic jewels to the clothes and simply re-sells them on ebay, and she turns out a few shirts/pants every week.

/funniest thing i've seen was she took a cheap $10 pair of jeans, and using the jewels she glued "ABBA" on the butt of it, they sold on ebay for $131 plus shipping.
//I would laugh, but frankly I'd rather punch the person who bought jeans for that much
 
2012-12-11 12:13:18 AM  

CruJones: can I donate clothes to Goodwill that I bought at Goodwill?


My mother always gave clothes to the 7th Day Adventists, not Goodwill or the Salvation Army, because the 7th Day Adventists did not sell the duds, they gave them to needy people.

My mother - you've probably never heard of her, she's kind of obscure.
 
2012-12-11 12:14:36 AM  
Can I disown my generation?
 
2012-12-11 12:15:43 AM  
I had a read about something called "The New Sincerity" which is apparently the philosophical wellspring of the hipster movement. My head nearly exploded wide open from the pretension of it all. I wish I could pimp that sort of horse shiat with a straight face so that I could separate the insecure from their money.
 
2012-12-11 12:17:35 AM  
Anyone ever been to downtown Santa Cruz? Every damn store is a vintage retailer yet there is a farkin Urban Outiftters in the center of it all. I can't say that the vintage retailers are any less overpriced, though.
 
2012-12-11 12:19:00 AM  

RogermcAllen: JohnAnnArbor: Fano: Abox: Hipster claiming there's no such thing as hipsters in 3...2...1...

Let me head off that bullshiat by giving an easy definition of a hipster that does not include mention of specific items of clothing or objects they carry:

A hipster can be defined by liking things for ironic purposes only. Value in their eyes is determined by liking things because they are "lame" or "square" or "uncool." Obscurity helps. Step 2 is defining an ingroup of other people that like things in an ironic fashion. Not to embrace kitsch or retro on its own merits. Thus the circle is squared.

But they have to like the SAME things, right? Or are the hipster friends expected to each have mutually-exclusive interests?

/We need anthropologists to study this question.

Hipster is like twins, it usually skips a generation.

Person 1 likes a new band and is a hipster because the new band is obscure. You probably haven't heard of them.
Person 2 starts liking the band, is a poser. Person 1 liked that band before they sold out.
Person 3 starts liking the band and is a hipster because they are ironically liking a band that only posers like.


I was about to say that the ingroup also likes said uncool things, but you posted a complicating wrinkle that explains why the concept of being a hipster is inherently unstable and indefensible as an ethos. I was presenting a Ptolemaic version of Hipsterdom, where the Hipsters formed into interlocking orbits based on their shared likes. I realize I stand corrected that one of the most pernicious sins of Hipsters is as you describe, eating their own. My central premise still holds up though I didn't consider the consequences of multiple iterations of enjoying things ironically. My view is now going fractal.
 
2012-12-11 12:19:15 AM  
In the late '70s I worked at a tourist restaurant on the beach islands in Tampa/St. Pete, Florida. I drew charcoal portraits of folks waiting for tables during season. I rented space from dealers who traveled the US, buying turquoise and silver jewelry in the Southwest and selling it to the Yankee Jews, affluent Midwesterners and Canadians in FL. They then bought fancy shells and sold them to landlocked folks in New Mex and AZ. Cycle of desire. Portraits and porno sell anywhere, thank christ.
 
2012-12-11 12:20:12 AM  
Recycling clothes in your store = bad.

Recycling Reddit threads as "news" stories = good.

Got it.
 
2012-12-11 12:20:26 AM  
Who gives a fluck what people spend their money on? It's their money. You buy shti that I would never buy and I'm sure I buy shti you would never buy. Big deal. Get over yourselves.
 
2012-12-11 12:21:38 AM  

ArcadianRefugee: Is it ridiculous to pay $50 for something you could buy for $5? Yes.

Is it ridiculous to not sell something for $50 wen you bought it for $5, if some idiot didn't read the first Q&A? Yes.


Also when it was brand new it probablys cost LESS than 2 dollars to make and therefore the first round consumer was paying an even higher markup.
 
2012-12-11 12:23:16 AM  

spacemanjones: Who gives a fluck what people spend their money on? It's their money. You buy shti that I would never buy and I'm sure I buy shti you would never buy. Big deal. Get over yourselves.


I'll sell you my shiat for fifty bucks. It's vintage.
 
2012-12-11 12:23:54 AM  

spamdog: I had a read about something called "The New Sincerity" which is apparently the philosophical wellspring of the hipster movement. My head nearly exploded wide open from the pretension of it all. I wish I could pimp that sort of horse shiat with a straight face so that I could separate the insecure from their money.


Ouroboros

Money quote from wiki:

Critic Jim Collins introduced the concept of "new sincerity" to film criticism in his 1993 essay entitled "Genericity in the 90s: Eclectic Irony and the New Sincerity." In this essay he contrasts films that treat genre conventions with "eclectic irony" and those that treat them seriously, with "new sincerity." Collins describes

the 'new sincerity' of films like Field of Dreams (1989), Dances With Wolves (1990), and Hook (1991), all of which depend not on hybridization, but on an "ethnographic" rewriting of the classic genre film that serves as their inspiration, all attempting, using one strategy or another, to recover a lost "purity," which apparently pre-existed even the Golden Age of film genre.

Other critics have suggested "new sincerity" as a descriptive term for work by American filmmakers such as Wes Anderson, P. T. Anderson, Todd Louiso, Sofia Coppola, and Charlie Kaufman, Zach Braff, and Jared Hess,[18] and filmmakers from other countries such as Michel Gondry, Lars von Trier, the Dogme 95 movement, Aki Kaurismäki, and Pedro Almodóvar. The "aesthetics of new sincerity" have also been connected to other art forms including "reality television, Internet blogs, diary style 'chicklit' literature, [and] personal videos on You-Tube. . . . "
 
2012-12-11 12:24:04 AM  
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-12-11 12:25:21 AM  

spacemanjones: Who gives a fluck what people spend their money on? It's their money. You buy shti that I would never buy and I'm sure I buy shti you would never buy. Big deal. Get over yourselves.


you said "shti" twice
 
2012-12-11 12:25:58 AM  
I never really understood all the anti-hipster sentiment on fark.

That is, until the other night when I found myself in a local brewery completely filled with hipsters. I honestly wanted to start kicking people in the nuts. It's really that annoying. Frankly I'm amazed I ever got in the place without cuffed skinny jeans, thick plastic-rimmed glasses, and a secondhand fedora. Maybe they just wanted to laugh at the normal guy with a real job. In which case I say, laugh away.
 
2012-12-11 12:26:19 AM  

Fano: RogermcAllen: JohnAnnArbor: Fano: Abox: Hipster claiming there's no such thing as hipsters in 3...2...1...

Let me head off that bullshiat by giving an easy definition of a hipster that does not include mention of specific items of clothing or objects they carry:

A hipster can be defined by liking things for ironic purposes only. Value in their eyes is determined by liking things because they are "lame" or "square" or "uncool." Obscurity helps. Step 2 is defining an ingroup of other people that like things in an ironic fashion. Not to embrace kitsch or retro on its own merits. Thus the circle is squared.

But they have to like the SAME things, right? Or are the hipster friends expected to each have mutually-exclusive interests?

/We need anthropologists to study this question.

Hipster is like twins, it usually skips a generation.

Person 1 likes a new band and is a hipster because the new band is obscure. You probably haven't heard of them.
Person 2 starts liking the band, is a poser. Person 1 liked that band before they sold out.
Person 3 starts liking the band and is a hipster because they are ironically liking a band that only posers like.

I was about to say that the ingroup also likes said uncool things, but you posted a complicating wrinkle that explains why the concept of being a hipster is inherently unstable and indefensible as an ethos. I was presenting a Ptolemaic version of Hipsterdom, where the Hipsters formed into interlocking orbits based on their shared likes. I realize I stand corrected that one of the most pernicious sins of Hipsters is as you describe, eating their own. My central premise still holds up though I didn't consider the consequences of multiple iterations of enjoying things ironically. My view is now going fractal.


A fractal Venn diagram of hipster preferences. I bet not even the xkcd could draw that up.
 
2012-12-11 12:26:54 AM  
...the xkcd guy...
 
2012-12-11 12:28:16 AM  
Anybody want to buy my old boxers? They're vintage.
 
2012-12-11 12:28:19 AM  
As much as I like to hate on the hipster crowd in my area, what they've been replaced with as the rents have risen is the worst sort of frat boy "bro" club. We still have plenty of great establishments for cheap beer off the beaten path, and the hipster crowd is opening up more places to drink as they get displaced to Logan Square (I never leave the Boiler Room sober), but I'll take skinny jeans and fixies weaving in and out of traffic at night with no lights or reflectors while riding with earbuds on Western and Ashland over "dude! man! let's get farked up and puke!" any day of the week.

/Wicker Park, Chicago.
 
2012-12-11 12:29:36 AM  

dudemanbro: Anybody want to buy my old boxers? They're vintage.


Would you run them through the wash first?

Hot cycle, with bleach?
 
2012-12-11 12:31:50 AM  

spacemanjones: Who gives a fluck what people spend their money on? It's their money. You buy shti that I would never buy and I'm sure I buy shti you would never buy. Big deal. Get over yourselves.



the shti you buy is unhip, thus you are beneath me.
 
2012-12-11 12:32:26 AM  
Hilarious!
I actually didn't know what Urban Outfitters was all about until less than a year ago, I had just never gone into one.
Having done so now, I can say that UO has some of the ugliest farking clothes and styles I've ever seen.
 
2012-12-11 12:33:23 AM  

The Dog Ate My Homework: I never really understood all the anti-hipster sentiment on fark.

That is, until the other night when I found myself in a local brewery completely filled with hipsters. I honestly wanted to start kicking people in the nuts. It's really that annoying. Frankly I'm amazed I ever got in the place without cuffed skinny jeans, thick plastic-rimmed glasses, and a secondhand fedora. Maybe they just wanted to laugh at the normal guy with a real job. In which case I say, laugh away.


Just never set foot in Williamsburg Brooklyn. If nothing else all the "hipster" all the neighborhoods in chicago are diverse enough so that the skinny jeans-wearing, ironic facial hair-sporting crowd are just here and there. Williamsburg felt like being at Epcot and having a "hipster-world" wedged in between "Canada" and "Morocco" where everyone was required to be in full costume the entire time.
 
2012-12-11 12:35:37 AM  

Longtime Lurker: The Dog Ate My Homework: I never really understood all the anti-hipster sentiment on fark.

That is, until the other night when I found myself in a local brewery completely filled with hipsters. I honestly wanted to start kicking people in the nuts. It's really that annoying. Frankly I'm amazed I ever got in the place without cuffed skinny jeans, thick plastic-rimmed glasses, and a secondhand fedora. Maybe they just wanted to laugh at the normal guy with a real job. In which case I say, laugh away.

Just never set foot in Williamsburg Brooklyn. If nothing else all the "hipster" all the neighborhoods in chicago are diverse enough so that the skinny jeans-wearing, ironic facial hair-sporting crowd are just here and there. Williamsburg felt like being at Epcot and having a "hipster-world" wedged in between "Canada" and "Morocco" where everyone was required to be in full costume the entire time.


But any name tags would be ironic.
 
2012-12-11 12:38:23 AM  

Longtime Lurker: As much as I like to hate on the hipster crowd in my area, what they've been replaced with as the rents have risen is the worst sort of frat boy "bro" club.


Are you trying to tell us there's a difference?
 
2012-12-11 12:41:10 AM  

Notabunny: spacemanjones: Who gives a fluck what people spend their money on? It's their money. You buy shti that I would never buy and I'm sure I buy shti you would never buy. Big deal. Get over yourselves.

you said "shti" twice


Shti, sorry.
 
2012-12-11 12:43:19 AM  

netcentric: spacemanjones: Who gives a fluck what people spend their money on? It's their money. You buy shti that I would never buy and I'm sure I buy shti you would never buy. Big deal. Get over yourselves.


the shti you buy is unhip, thus you are beneath me.


Agreed. I haven't bought anything hip in about 10 years. I'm ok with that. 3 kids will grow you up real quick. Comfy shoes. That's all I want.
 
2012-12-11 12:45:25 AM  

Heamer: Also, Thrift Shop. (NSFW lyrics)


They be like, Oh that Gucci, that's hella tight
I'm like, yo, that's $50 for a t-shirt!
Limited edition, let's do some simple addition
$50 for a t-shirt that's just some ignorant biatch, shiat
I call that get swindled and pimped, shiat
I call that getting tricked by a bizness
That shirt's hella dope
And having the same one as six other people in this club is a hella don't
Peep game, come take a look through my telescope
Trying to get girls from a brand? Then you hella won't
 
2012-12-11 12:47:37 AM  
Urban Outfitters is SO OVER! caskstrength.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-12-11 12:48:27 AM  
UO is one of my clients. The women who work in their corporate offices are incredibly hot.
 
2012-12-11 12:48:34 AM  
I don't even know what hipsters are, but I'm pretty sure I wouldn't like them.
 
2012-12-11 12:48:51 AM  
I wish thrift stores or Goodwill had anything I could wear. I'm 6'3", roughly 165 lbs, so... basically built like a telephone poll. It's rough finding pants and shirts that fit me, and they often have to be ordered online.
 
2012-12-11 12:51:25 AM  

spacemanjones: Notabunny: spacemanjones: Who gives a fluck what people spend their money on? It's their money. You buy shti that I would never buy and I'm sure I buy shti you would never buy. Big deal. Get over yourselves.

you said "shti" twice

Shti, sorry.


I just figured you like shti
 
2012-12-11 12:51:41 AM  

Wayne 985: basically built like a telephone poll


In other words, you're built like a survey? Like one Gallup would call you up for?
 
2012-12-11 12:52:05 AM  

Longtime Lurker: The Dog Ate My Homework: I never really understood all the anti-hipster sentiment on fark.

That is, until the other night when I found myself in a local brewery completely filled with hipsters. I honestly wanted to start kicking people in the nuts. It's really that annoying. Frankly I'm amazed I ever got in the place without cuffed skinny jeans, thick plastic-rimmed glasses, and a secondhand fedora. Maybe they just wanted to laugh at the normal guy with a real job. In which case I say, laugh away.

Just never set foot in Williamsburg Brooklyn. If nothing else all the "hipster" all the neighborhoods in chicago are diverse enough so that the skinny jeans-wearing, ironic facial hair-sporting crowd are just here and there. Williamsburg felt like being at Epcot and having a "hipster-world" wedged in between "Canada" and "Morocco" where everyone was required to be in full costume the entire time.


Busch Gardens, the Old Country, the Dark Continent, Retard Land.

Everytime I see Williamsburg, Brooklyn it makes no sense to me and I think "Williamsburg, Brooklyn, NY came around 200 years after Williamsburg, VA. Is this a divide by zero for hipsters? "
 
2012-12-11 12:52:50 AM  
igcelebs.com

FUTURE HIPSTERS. i shudder to think about what they're all going to look like when they're old.
 
2012-12-11 12:54:46 AM  

Misconduc: And hipsters shell out the money regardless. It's no different in Florida, I know someone who buys jeans from Bealls Outlet, fades them and adds a few decorations from a kit she bought from walmart. I don't recall the name of the kit she buys, but she adds some fake plastic jewels to the clothes and simply re-sells them on ebay, and she turns out a few shirts/pants every week.

/funniest thing i've seen was she took a cheap $10 pair of jeans, and using the jewels she glued "ABBA" on the butt of it, they sold on ebay for $131 plus shipping.
//I would laugh, but frankly I'd rather punch the person who bought jeans for that much


I'm stealing that terrible, terrible idea.
 
2012-12-11 12:57:57 AM  
Not surprised one bit when you have "hipsters" buying (soon) $7.00/cup for coffee at
Starbucks, waiting in line for days/weeks for the latest iJunk, is anyone surprised?
 
2012-12-11 12:59:51 AM  

Happy Hours: Wayne 985: basically built like a telephone poll

In other words, you're built like a survey? Like one Gallup would call you up for?


I guess I could be, if you had a vertical bar graph with one really popular option.
 
2012-12-11 01:05:02 AM  
doin it for twenty years - good for you but now -
CATS OUTTA THE BAG

time for a new gig
 
2012-12-11 01:06:50 AM  
Thats so awesome and putrid at the same time... The key to the 'scam' is simply to just never admit how shady it is... Just keep on parroting the claim that its an exclusive item appealing to a select demographic.
 
2012-12-11 01:15:47 AM  

Abox: Hipster claiming there's no such thing as hipsters in 3...2...1...


I'm not really a hipster, I'm only acting like one ironically.
 
2012-12-11 01:19:12 AM  
I'm sure they're not buying them from "flea markets and yard sales" but rather from second-hand clothing dealers who buy and sell this stuff by the container-load. They're the people who are responsible for all the out-of-date American clothes seen on people in Africa and other parts of the 3rd world.
 
2012-12-11 01:20:59 AM  
Alll the old hipsters around here pay top dollar for "antique" furniture and other used junk.
 
2012-12-11 01:35:20 AM  
It actually should be illegal for a huge corporation like Urban Outfitters to do this.
 
2012-12-11 01:35:42 AM  

Abox: Hipster claiming there's no such thing as hipsters in 3...2...1...


Or Hipster claiming "too many Hipsters around here" when shopping at Urban Outfitters while sidestepping the fact that himself/herself obviously *is* a Hipster
 
2012-12-11 01:42:58 AM  
Perfect opportunity to use the Ironic Tag, and subbie blew it.
 
2012-12-11 01:43:22 AM  
dcist.com

The Real Deal

/Urban Outfitters even tries to cop the look of the place.
 
2012-12-11 01:44:21 AM  

The Dog Ate My Homework: I never really understood all the anti-hipster sentiment on fark.

That is, until the other night when I found myself in a local brewery completely filled with hipsters. I honestly wanted to start kicking people in the nuts. It's really that annoying. Frankly I'm amazed I ever got in the place without cuffed skinny jeans, thick plastic-rimmed glasses, and a secondhand fedora. Maybe they just wanted to laugh at the normal guy with a real job. In which case I say, laugh away.


I was that 'normal guy' two weeks ago at The Brooklyn Bowl, which is around the corner from the Brooklyn Brewery. Unlike you, I don't care. I'm old-ish and I have earned the privilege of being uncool. The folks there were nice enough, but I did get the sense of "c'mon, really?" at what they were charging for stuff. Lanes there go for $25/half hour for example.
 
2012-12-11 01:58:57 AM  

Fano: A hipster can be defined by liking things for ironic purposes only. Value in their eyes is determined by liking things because they are "lame" or "square" or "uncool." Obscurity helps. Step 2 is defining an ingroup of other people that like things in an ironic fashion. Not to embrace kitsch or retro on its own merits. Thus the circle is squared.


I actually read the best description of hipsters in this thread once upon a time. I'll repost for emphasis:


At the base of hipsterism is the search for "authenticity" in the existentialist sense -being true to themselves despite external pressure- and an idea that their own contemporary culture is inauthentic. But not everyone who seeks authenticity outside the mainstream is a hipster: the key ingredient is the idea that authenticity is something you can get from somebody else: mimed, traded for, or bought outright. The theory goes that by doing what "authentic" people do and not doing what "inauthentic" people do, one will eventually become authentic.

The thing about hipsters is that they seek "authenticity" (in the existentialist sense: being true to one's self despite external pressure), but they think authenticity is something that can be mimed, but they also think that their own contemporary culture is hopelessly inauthentic. By doing what "authentic" people do and avoiding what "inauthentic" people do, the theory goes, they too will eventually find their own authenticity.

Almost any non-hipster can tell you that this is absurd, but it is key to understanding how hipsters work: they have a massive blind spot with respect to their own inauthenticity. They look outside themselves to find something authentic, spot it in another culture and/or time period, and take on the trappings of what they have found. That's an inherently inauthentic thing to do, but the hipsters don't get that.

Eventually, though, pop culture -which has always been fascinated by hipsters and their predecessors- picks up on the latest thing, and starts doing it themselves. Now the hipsters can see the inauthenticity, because "inauthentic" people are doing it too. But rather than seeing the inauthenticity in their own actions, they blame the thing itself, claiming that it has become inauthentic (or, to use a popular term, "sold out"): a thing that is rarely if ever true. The hipsters then abandon their old pursuit and look for the next authentic thing to mime.

This is why hipsters cannot create. Creating things is, in and of itself, a demonstration that the creator understands something critical: that authenticity comes from within. You cannot understand this and be a hipster; it will either stop you from miming others' authenticity in the first place, or it will stop you from seeing what you're doing in those terms, which in turn prevent you from fleeing ahead of the mainstream tide.
 
2012-12-11 02:03:12 AM  

whidbey: It actually should be illegal for a huge corporation like Urban Outfitters to do this.


lol ok
 
2012-12-11 02:05:12 AM  

Longtime Lurker: The Dog Ate My Homework: I never really understood all the anti-hipster sentiment on fark.

That is, until the other night when I found myself in a local brewery completely filled with hipsters. I honestly wanted to start kicking people in the nuts. It's really that annoying. Frankly I'm amazed I ever got in the place without cuffed skinny jeans, thick plastic-rimmed glasses, and a secondhand fedora. Maybe they just wanted to laugh at the normal guy with a real job. In which case I say, laugh away.

Just never set foot in Williamsburg Brooklyn. If nothing else all the "hipster" all the neighborhoods in chicago are diverse enough so that the skinny jeans-wearing, ironic facial hair-sporting crowd are just here and there. Williamsburg felt like being at Epcot and having a "hipster-world" wedged in between "Canada" and "Morocco" where everyone was required to be in full costume the entire time.


No joke there. I think the only reason I survived my trip to Williamsburg is because I was fully "Goth'd out" when I decided to venture there (I still felt like a fish out of water, with how the people acted around me). They still didn't let me modify the cheeseburger I ordered. I felt going full Jack Nicholson on them (since I was born in his town where he grew up, I was feeling his spirit rise into me... oh wait, he's not dead yet!), but felt too tired and hungry at the time to complain and decided, "What the hell, I am trying to figure out what these people are like, I might as well eat their food." Big mistake, the burger was hell; an over spiced mishmash of confusing flavors. Whole bunch of vinyl shops, no record player stores though. (weird!) The people were even worse.
 
2012-12-11 02:07:53 AM  
To

DarkSoulNoHope: I think the only reason I survived my trip to Williamsburg is because I was fully "Goth'd out" when I decided to venture there (I still felt like a fish out of water, with how the people acted around me). They still didn't let me modify the cheeseburger I ordered.


To be fair, no one knows what the fark a "dark cheeseburger" is
 
2012-12-11 02:11:43 AM  

whidbey: It actually should be illegal for a huge corporation like Urban Outfitters to do this.


No. But they should have a labeling requirement on the rack that says "We got these outfits at a garage sale and marked them up after cleaning them."
 
2012-12-11 02:16:28 AM  

BigJake: ToDarkSoulNoHope: I think the only reason I survived my trip to Williamsburg is because I was fully "Goth'd out" when I decided to venture there (I still felt like a fish out of water, with how the people acted around me). They still didn't let me modify the cheeseburger I ordered.

To be fair, no one knows what the fark a "dark cheeseburger" is


They didn't know what a "plain cheeseburger" was either. The topping they used didn't come off easy, it looked like cooked spinach out of the can, though the menu claimed a more exotic title for the foodstuff. So I ate it whole, my mouth didn't approve. I should have gone to a Kosher shop a few blocks away in the Orthodox section; I wouldn't been able to get a cheeseburger but at least they know what "plain" means (or with "just ketchup").
 
2012-12-11 02:16:44 AM  

Ishkur: Fano: A hipster can be defined by liking things for ironic purposes only. Value in their eyes is determined by liking things because they are "lame" or "square" or "uncool." Obscurity helps. Step 2 is defining an ingroup of other people that like things in an ironic fashion. Not to embrace kitsch or retro on its own merits. Thus the circle is squared.

I actually read the best description of hipsters in this thread once upon a time. I'll repost for emphasis:


At the base of hipsterism is the search for "authenticity" in the existentialist sense -being true to themselves despite external pressure- and an idea that their own contemporary culture is inauthentic. But not everyone who seeks authenticity outside the mainstream is a hipster: the key ingredient is the idea that authenticity is something you can get from somebody else: mimed, traded for, or bought outright. The theory goes that by doing what "authentic" people do and not doing what "inauthentic" people do, one will eventually become authentic.

The thing about hipsters is that they seek "authenticity" (in the existentialist sense: being true to one's self despite external pressure), but they think authenticity is something that can be mimed, but they also think that their own contemporary culture is hopelessly inauthentic. By doing what "authentic" people do and avoiding what "inauthentic" people do, the theory goes, they too will eventually find their own authenticity.

Almost any non-hipster can tell you that this is absurd, but it is key to understanding how hipsters work: they have a massive blind spot with respect to their own inauthenticity. They look outside themselves to find something authentic, spot it in another culture and/or time period, and take on the trappings of what they have found. That's an inherently inauthentic thing to do, but the hipsters don't get that.

Eventually, though, pop culture -which has always been fascinated by hipsters and their predecessors- picks up on the latest thing ...


That is a perfect description. I feel humbled by my attempt to circumvent a Hipster debate thread based on what I considered first principles. Your data should be posted in every Hipster thread, as it is entirely accurate. I don't hate them; I haven't run into enough of them to get that visceral feeling. I pity such folks that have such a worldview.
 
2012-12-11 02:20:23 AM  
I love Urban! I worked there part time (2nd job) and they had the most amazing employee sales. And the discounts counted for Anthropologie and Free People. That being said, I'm all about the thrift stores... I find great stuff there sometimes. For a while I had an Etsy account and yes I marked up the hell out of stuff. It takes a lot of effort to find stuff though, but I did make money. Fashion is fun! You don't have to be a hipster to like to look nice. Too bad I spend half my week covered in hay and/or poop. Sometimes I think about quitting the day job and doing Etsy full time, But my benefits are too good and my job is too stable... For now.
 
2012-12-11 02:23:21 AM  

Fano: A hipster can be defined by liking things for ironic purposes only. Value in their eyes is determined by liking things because they are "lame" or "square" or "uncool." Obscurity helps. Step 2 is defining an ingroup of other people that like things in an ironic fashion.


Is something cool because it is inherently cool, or because cool people like it? i.e., is coolness objective or relative?

If coolness is objective, then the liking of something ironically (being a thing) is itself objectively cool or uncool, which leaves four possibilities depending on the coolness of the original thing (for simplicity, say each hipster only likes one thing ironically).

Cool thing the ironic liking of which is also cool (impossible by definition since hipsters only ironically like uncool things)
Cool thing the ironic liking of which is uncool (paradoxical meta-hipster)
Uncool thing the ironic liking of which is cool (classic hipster)
Uncool thing the ironic liking of which is uncool (the hipster's hipster, the meta-hipster)

Now, does a particular hipster care what other people think of their hipsterism? i.e. is a particular hipster a solitary hipster, or a 'hipster disciple'? This can't affect the objective coolness of anything, since people could in principle think differently (unless you don't believe in free will).

Consider the classical hipster: do he believe his hipsterism is cool, or uncool? i.e., is he a classic hipster who thinks he is a meta-hipster, or a meta-hipster who thinks he is a classic hipster? Or has he correctly self-categorized?

Assuming correct self-categorization, is he happy with his lot? Unhappy meta-hipsters will tend to form groups, to create a supportive environment where the can safely delude themselves into thinking they are cool. Unhappy classic hipsters will tend to self-isolate, most easily achieved by placing a higher value on obscurity.

Happy classic hipsters will also tend to self-isolate, and happy meta-hipsters may form groups, although the dual uncoolness of their hipsterism is likely to inhibit group-formation, plus there probably aren't that many of them.

Thus I present to you (given the assumptions above), the Hipster Disciple Conjecture: an in-group of hipsters is most likely to consist of unhappy classic hipsters, or meta-hipster wannabes.
 
2012-12-11 02:30:59 AM  

The Dog Ate My Homework: I never really understood all the anti-hipster sentiment on fark.

That is, until the other night when I found myself in a local brewery completely filled with hipsters. I honestly wanted to start kicking people in the nuts. It's really that annoying. Frankly I'm amazed I ever got in the place without cuffed skinny jeans, thick plastic-rimmed glasses, and a secondhand fedora.


There seems to be two distinctly different, shall we say, "styles" of hipster.
One is that subtype that can all be described the way you did: skinny jeans, glasses, etc.
The other is the kind that takes their fetish for ironic / obscure things into the clothing realm as well. They have no uniform, per se, but can be identified by the ridiculosity level of their outfit. Even beyond shopping at thrift stores or some local designer you've never heard of, the things they wear are ironic because nobody in their right farking mind would wear them. A Canadian fur hat with a tank top, or cutoff shorts with an ugly knit sweater? Scarves in any given weather, or a dude wearing a dress with a beret? Hipsters are like the Rule 34 for clothing: if you can think of it, a hipster has worn it. I know more than one person who lives in a hipster-dense area that plays the game "costume or outfit?".

lookatthisfuckinhipster.comlookatthisfuckinhipster.comlookatthisfuckinhipster.com
lookatthisfuckinhipster.com
 
2012-12-11 02:33:48 AM  
pretty sure they've been doing this for ages. the clothing had a tag that said 'urban renewal.'

even without the tag it's easy to tell which clothes were copped from a thrift store (with 500% markup).
 
2012-12-11 02:35:59 AM  

arghyematey: You don't have to be a hipster to like to look nice.


That's hipster-level irony, right there. LOL XD
 
2012-12-11 02:37:12 AM  

Ishkur: I actually read the best description of hipsters in this thread once upon a time. I'll repost for emphasis:


Huh... that's a great description, actually.
 
2012-12-11 02:39:46 AM  

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: Fano: A hipster can be defined by liking things for ironic purposes only. Value in their eyes is determined by liking things because they are "lame" or "square" or "uncool." Obscurity helps. Step 2 is defining an ingroup of other people that like things in an ironic fashion.

Is something cool because it is inherently cool, or because cool people like it? i.e., is coolness objective or relative?

If coolness is objective, then the liking of something ironically (being a thing) is itself objectively cool or uncool, which leaves four possibilities depending on the coolness of the original thing (for simplicity, say each hipster only likes one thing ironically).

Cool thing the ironic liking of which is also cool (impossible by definition since hipsters only ironically like uncool things)
Cool thing the ironic liking of which is uncool (paradoxical meta-hipster)
Uncool thing the ironic liking of which is cool (classic hipster)
Uncool thing the ironic liking of which is uncool (the hipster's hipster, the meta-hipster)

Now, does a particular hipster care what other people think of their hipsterism? i.e. is a particular hipster a solitary hipster, or a 'hipster disciple'? This can't affect the objective coolness of anything, since people could in principle think differently (unless you don't believe in free will).

Consider the classical hipster: do he believe his hipsterism is cool, or uncool? i.e., is he a classic hipster who thinks he is a meta-hipster, or a meta-hipster who thinks he is a classic hipster? Or has he correctly self-categorized?

Assuming correct self-categorization, is he happy with his lot? Unhappy meta-hipsters will tend to form groups, to create a supportive environment where the can safely delude themselves into thinking they are cool. Unhappy classic hipsters will tend to self-isolate, most easily achieved by placing a higher value on obscurity.

Happy classic hipsters will also tend to self-isolate, and happy meta-hipsters may form groups ...


After original principles, hipsters divide by zero and walk themselves into a hall of mirrors. I cannot vouch for any of these things. Better posters than I have listed the caveats.
 
2012-12-11 02:50:50 AM  

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: Consider the classical hipster: do he believe his hipsterism is cool, or uncool? i.e., is he a classic hipster who thinks he is a meta-hipster, or a meta-hipster who thinks he is a classic hipster? Or has he correctly self-categorized?


You're over-thinking this. Let me restate in my own words the brilliance of farker Millenium in breaking down hipsters:

Hipsters want authenticity. They think they can get it by miming whatever else has been deemed authentic, but they are tragically unable to grasp the internal contradiction that miming authenticity is an inherently inauthentic act.

When the authentic thing that they are inauthentically miming gets popular and other people start doing it, hipsters always react negatively because they see the inauthenticity in other people joining a fad or trend but are unable to see it in themselves. This is why they always respond with scorn and derision when it comes to knowing/liking/listening to music before others have. Or better yet, music that no one else has heard (thus preserving their faux-inauthenticity).

To be a hipster is to be in a state of constantly searching for an authentic source of something that is not currently being expressed inauthentically by anyone else (hence the mashing of retro styles). If this is not possible, then they will indulge it on a superficial level (ie: for the irony) to maintain the insecure notion of their own authenticity.... so long as they enjoy it on a different level than anyone else, they consider themselves in the clear.
 
2012-12-11 03:07:18 AM  

Gawdzila: arghyematey: You don't have to be a hipster to like to look nice.

That's hipster-level irony, right there. LOL XD


If I were a hipster, would I be posting on Fark? Fark is decidedly un-hip. I'm just a nerd who happens to like fashion.
 
2012-12-11 03:28:52 AM  
Props to the marketing people who thought up this little scheme.
 
2012-12-11 03:34:18 AM  

arghyematey: Gawdzila: arghyematey: You don't have to be a hipster to like to look nice.

That's hipster-level irony, right there. LOL XD

If I were a hipster, would I be posting on Fark? Fark is decidedly un-hip. I'm just a nerd who happens to like fashion.


I didn't suggest that you were a hipster, necessarily, I only meant that there was irony in implying that hipsters "look nice".
 
2012-12-11 03:49:01 AM  

Gawdzila: arghyematey: Gawdzila: arghyematey: You don't have to be a hipster to like to look nice.

That's hipster-level irony, right there. LOL XD

If I were a hipster, would I be posting on Fark? Fark is decidedly un-hip. I'm just a nerd who happens to like fashion.

I didn't suggest that you were a hipster, necessarily, I only meant that there was irony in implying that hipsters "look nice".


Oh, gotcha. Although I will say, at least hipsters (and goths, and preps, and [enter sub-genre here]) try to look... something. I'd rather have people be dressed outlandishly than roll out of bed and throw on sweatpants, a ratty old shirt, and flip flops. Hell, wear Halloween costumes every day of the year- at least it's interesting.
 
2012-12-11 03:51:37 AM  
People buy stuff at Urban Outfitters?
 
2012-12-11 05:57:44 AM  
pjmedia.com
 
2012-12-11 06:13:06 AM  
"Urban Renewal has been a part of Urban Outfitters for over 20 years. It is an exclusive brand that offers our customers' unique goods handcrafted in Philadelphia from recycled fabrics and dead stock materials sourced from around the world."



"Urban Renewal" is not visiting garage sales and thrift stores.
 
2012-12-11 07:14:47 AM  

davidphogan: Abox: Hipster claiming there's no such thing as hipsters in 3...2...1...

Dude. I live in Portland. Hipsters exist, I know many and probably would be called one by most of Fark. I just don't know any who admit to shopping at Urban Outfitters.


FTFY.
 
2012-12-11 07:27:38 AM  

arghyematey: Gawdzila: arghyematey: Gawdzila: arghyematey: You don't have to be a hipster to like to look nice.

That's hipster-level irony, right there. LOL XD

If I were a hipster, would I be posting on Fark? Fark is decidedly un-hip. I'm just a nerd who happens to like fashion.

I didn't suggest that you were a hipster, necessarily, I only meant that there was irony in implying that hipsters "look nice".

Oh, gotcha. Although I will say, at least hipsters (and goths, and preps, and [enter sub-genre here]) try to look... something. I'd rather have people be dressed outlandishly than roll out of bed and throw on sweatpants, a ratty old shirt, and flip flops. Hell, wear Halloween costumes every day of the year- at least it's interesting.


That something isn't interesting.
 
2012-12-11 07:42:27 AM  
images2.static-bluray.com
"What, would you say, is the easiest way to get money away from a Hipster?..."
 
2012-12-11 07:49:07 AM  
While I'm nowhere near a "hipster" lifestyle/mindset, I have been doing this for years buying at the local Goodwill/Salvation army and reselling on eBay for markup and profit. You'ld be amazed at what you can find, last week I picked up two A&F and Hollister sweatshirts from Goodwill for $4 each. They still had the original pricetag on there with one marked at $29.99. I pulled the tag off and sold it on eBay for $40 +shipping BIN and it sold within 6 hours.

I typically stick to clothes because it's easier to ship and you can offer deals like combined shipping, but I have found some good deals on watches and small electronics (picked up two like-new Nintendo 3DS units, both for the price I'd pay for one new in the store, and 5 games for the kids.

I see nothing wrong with this, what I see is people too lazy to do their own research and find things like thrift stores or who think they're too good to goto garage sale/yard sales.

There are stores out here called Plato's Closet, that will buy back "gently used" clothing and turn around and re-sell them. They only take name-brand clothes however (A&F, Hollister, etc. No Walmart/Samsclub stuff is even looked at)

They turn around and sell that stuff for crazy prices (but still well below the "new" price you'ld pay at any of those retailers)
 
2012-12-11 07:55:02 AM  
"Urban Outfitters putting on some crazy markup and charging $50 for a shirt you could've gotten for $5," one commenter noted. "They're basically selling old clothes to people for a new clothes price, and calling it vintage."

So, this guy considers $50 a normal price for a shirt and he complains about other people overpaying?
 
2012-12-11 08:00:11 AM  
141. Only fools pay retail.
 
2012-12-11 08:00:18 AM  
no hipster on earth would shop at urban outfitters
 
2012-12-11 08:12:43 AM  
jaytkay


CruJones: can I donate clothes to Goodwill that I bought at Goodwill?

My mother always gave clothes to the 7th Day Adventists, not Goodwill or the Salvation Army, because the 7th Day Adventists did not sell the duds, they gave them to needy people.

My mother - you've probably never heard of her, she's kind of obscure.


No, we all know about your mother (wink, wink)
 
2012-12-11 08:19:53 AM  
A fool and his money are soon drinking douche.
 
2012-12-11 08:28:06 AM  
This just in! Kids are stupid. News at 11pm.
 
2012-12-11 08:46:22 AM  
I like to think of myself as a pioneer of the "bought at Sears" look....
 
2012-12-11 08:59:09 AM  

Wayne 985: I wish thrift stores or Goodwill had anything I could wear. I'm 6'3", roughly 165 lbs, so... basically built like a telephone poll. It's rough finding pants and shirts that fit me, and they often have to be ordered online.


I was that size when I graduated high school and can attest. You look like an incredible asshole while swimming in an XLarge tshirt but anything smaller is too short. My advice is to drink lots of beer to fill out.
 
2012-12-11 09:03:36 AM  
 
2012-12-11 09:11:40 AM  
Back in college (early '70s), one of my friends would buy new coveralls and trade them to the other farmers in his town for their old ones. He then sold the old ones to the "hippy" kids from the City for 5 times as much. Kept him in beer and books.
 
2012-12-11 10:33:38 AM  
1. Buy Levis
2. Shoot full of holes with shotgun.
3. Sell at 10 times purchase price.
4. Profit
 
2012-12-11 10:41:52 AM  

SarahDiddle: I don't generally shop at Urban Outfitters but I'm okay with this. I hate taking the time in Goodwill/Salvation Army/Random thrift store and sorting through all the clothes attempting to find something I like, in my size, and also in wearable condition. I want to walk in, maybe do quick browse (15 minutes, tops) and leave. Preferably without needing to try on clothes as well. I hate clothes shopping.


This is why I buy the same six shirts in different colors in the same size I've always been online at Gap. Their clothes don't look like you're a tween prostitute or that rainbow bright threw up on them.

Way to go, UO! A fool and his money are soon parted.
 
2012-12-11 10:45:55 AM  

Ishkur: You're over-thinking this.


Most definitely. But since there is nothing riding on the outcome, I feel free to.

Ishkur: Let me restate in my own words the brilliance of farker Millenium in breaking down hipsters:


Thank you. His words are undeniably brilliant, and I appreciate your perspective on them.

Having established what hipsterism *is*, the thing I find interesting is what RogermcAllen and Fano pointed out:

RogermcAllen:

Person 1 likes a new band and is a hipster because the new band is obscure. You probably haven't heard of them.
Person 2 starts liking the band, is a poser. Person 1 liked that band before they sold out.
Person 3 starts liking the band and is a hipster because they are ironically liking a band that only posers like.


Fano:

...the consequences of multiple iterations of enjoying things ironically. My view is now going fractal.

So, when the 'other people' (who reveal inauthenticity) are themselves hipsters, we've got, as Fano put it, a hall of mirrors.

That's what I was thinking out loud about. Fano referred to coolness, or squareness. But it seems he agrees authenticity is a better descriptor. Whatever 'authenticity' is (do you have a definition?), I think probing the hall of mirrors requires, as a first step, asking whether authenticity is objective or relative.

If it's objective, then whether it can be bought or mimed is an interesting question. If it is relative, then why shouldn't it be possible to buy or mime it?
 
2012-12-11 10:54:25 AM  
This isn't a big bad pharmaceutical charging $5000 a dose for cancer medication. It isn't even an abusive monopoly situation.

Urban Outfitters is free to charge whatever they think they can get for their clothes. You are free to buy your clothes anywhere else. This is the free market. This is how it works.
 
2012-12-11 11:02:22 AM  
This idea of authenticity=hip is nothing new.

Frank Zappa nailed it some 40 years ago: "Is that a real poncho or a Sears poncho?"
 
2012-12-11 11:08:07 AM  

believe the hype: FUTURE HIPSTERS. i shudder to think about what they're all going to look like when they're old.


And that my friends is EXACTLY why all 17 of my tattoos are easily covered by a standard t-shirt and jeans. So that when I'm all old and wrinkly I won't look quite as stupid as the rest of these yahoos.
 
2012-12-11 11:30:38 AM  

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: Whatever 'authenticity' is (do you have a definition?), I think probing the hall of mirrors requires, as a first step, asking whether authenticity is objective or relative.
If it's objective, then whether it can be bought or mimed is an interesting question. If it is relative, then why shouldn't it be possible to buy or mime it?


Whatever it is, it has to come from within. True originality and inspiration must be your own, individual, indomitable self. You can be influenced by other styles and ideas, but what you come up with must germinate from your own imagination. And it must be honest and true to yourself. That is the nature of authenticity.

Hipsters are creative, but they do not create. In fact, they cannot create because in that moment of creation they cease to be hipsters. Creating things is a demonstration that the creator understands that true authenticity comes from within. You cannot understand this and be a hipster.

Man....someone should write a thesis on this.
 
2012-12-11 11:31:01 AM  

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: Whatever 'authenticity' is


Sorry, you already provided the defintion as 'being true to yourself despite external pressure'.

In which case, what does it mean to be true to yourself? What if your true self is a person who seeks to mime, buy, or trade for authenticity? That kind of a hipster would not be barred for creating, as Millenium put it, since his hipsterism *is* a manifestation of his true self.

But maybe that is an impossible true self to have, or an illegitimate one?
 
2012-12-11 11:32:54 AM  
I'm too hip to be a hipster.

I'd think most hipsters are just about at the age limit for the affectation. I wonder what the next fad will be....
 
2012-12-11 11:34:32 AM  

jaytkay: CruJones: can I donate clothes to Goodwill that I bought at Goodwill?

My mother always gave clothes to the 7th Day Adventists, not Goodwill or the Salvation Army, because the 7th Day Adventists did not sell the duds, they gave them to needy people.

My mother - you've probably never heard of her, she's kind of obscure.


This is my new favorite comment ever.
 
2012-12-11 11:35:15 AM  
I'm not sure what's more evil here - the fact that Urban Outfitters includes a business model that fleeces their less-than-intelligent customers directly, or that their business model depends on buying up affordable clothing for the poor to do so?
 
2012-12-11 11:43:39 AM  

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: In which case, what does it mean to be true to yourself?


It means be honest about what you're wearing, what you're liking, and what you're interested in. Don't fake a pet interest or style just because you want to be separate and different from everyone else. It outs you as a poseur for one thing, and moreover it gives off the indication that you are not liking things for their own sake but as a means to an end..... peer approval/acceptance or to associate with a specific group.

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: What if your true self is a person who seeks to mime, buy, or trade for authenticity?


This is like when Elim Garak in DS9 told Julian Bashir: "Everything I say is true, especially the lies." Because lies are a form of truth, if you're being true in lying about them.

Or if you want to define it in Boolean logic, you can evaluate whether a false statement is true. It is true that it is false, but just because the validity of the statement is true does not mean that it is not true.

What I'm trying to say is -- no. You cannot mime other styles and call it your own style of "miming other styles". It'd be like a painter cutting out parts of other paintings and putting them on his canvas and calling it an original painting. Yes, the collage is a valued form of art, but it is not an original painting if you did not paint it.

That is what hipsters are doing. They are mistaking the aesthetics of the style for the intent.
 
2012-12-11 12:00:29 PM  

MythDragon: [images2.static-bluray.com image 728x409]
"What, would you say, is the easiest way to get money away from a Hipster?..."


i47.tinypic.com
 
2012-12-11 12:01:52 PM  

Ishkur: True originality and inspiration must be your own, individual, indomitable self.


Well, as Newton said,"If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants."

I think that emphasizing the distinction between 'true' or authentic originality, and 'false', inauthentic originality, can be viewed as an attempt by a thinker to divorce themselves from the intellectual debt they owe their forebears and contemporaries. The shared birthright of human knowledge bars anyone from making the claim, "I am a creator -- you are merely creative", imo.

If a person wants to try out standing on the shoulders of various giants find a pleasing view, how do they see themselves when they're going through that period of trial and error, before they've committed themselves to a particular course? Probably as inauthentic. How to combat that feeling? Maybe with the soothing balm of irony.
 
2012-12-11 12:07:25 PM  

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: Well, as Newton said,"If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants."


Yes, but he saw further and saw new things. That's authentic.

Hipsters are looking at the same things the giants are.

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: an attempt by a thinker to divorce themselves from the intellectual debt they owe their forebears and contemporaries.


Not necessarily. You can always take what someone else has done and make it your own, or apply a new spin on it. Hipsters don't do this, or if they do, it's always kitsch-ironic. And doing things ironically -- pretending to like something because nobody else does -- is the pinnacle of inauthentic behavior.
 
2012-12-11 12:18:18 PM  

Ishkur: Hipsters are looking at the same things the giants are.


Wildly optimistic. After all, those giants were simply Newton's forebears, who had, in turn, stood upon the shoulders of others to achieve their own stature.

Hipsters stare at the kneecaps of giants and celebrate their membership in the forest of legs.
 
2012-12-11 12:25:47 PM  

Ishkur: You cannot mime other styles and call it your own style of "miming other styles". It'd be like a painter cutting out parts of other paintings and putting them on his canvas and calling it an original painting. Yes, the collage is a valued form of art, but it is not an original painting if you did not paint it.


Ishkur: And doing things ironically -- pretending to like something because nobody else does -- is the pinnacle of inauthentic behavior.


So consistency between what kind of artist you consider yourself to be, the process you use to create the art, and how you categorize the result...is that authenticity? Such a person could still be an original collage-is, in the eyes of other collage-ists, even if they don't consider themselves to be one.

So is this authentic or inauthentic? Specifically, the part where he implores the audience that he's not trying to be funny. According to what art form? 

If authenticity is linked to a particular taxonomy of art, then how does one go about creating a new art form?
 
2012-12-11 12:47:12 PM  

FormlessOne: Hipsters stare at the kneecaps of giants and celebrate their membership in the forest of legs.


Bwahaha! That's beautiful, man.

Between that and the Elim Garak quote, this thread delivers.
 
2012-12-11 12:47:19 PM  

FormlessOne: stare at the kneecaps of giants and celebrate their membership in the forest of legs.


If that's your original metaphor, it is very very good.
 
2012-12-11 12:56:02 PM  

H31N0US: FormlessOne: stare at the kneecaps of giants and celebrate their membership in the forest of legs.

If that's your original metaphor, it is very very good.


It is, indeed, original. Feel free to apply it where needed. :)
 
2012-12-11 01:14:37 PM  

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: So consistency between what kind of artist


Don't attack the analogy, attack the meaning. (this is why I hate using analogies)

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: So is this authentic or inauthentic?


Andy Kaufman was never authentic. Ever. About anything. Everything was kayfabe to him.
 
2012-12-11 01:45:24 PM  

Ishkur: Andy Kaufman was never authentic. Ever. About anything. Everything was kayfabe to him.


So, things were kayfabe, *to him*. But is there an authenticity to be found in his performances, even if not in the way *he* intended?

Ishkur: Don't attack the analogy, attack the meaning


Choosing to interpret my question as an attack, rather than as a request for clarification on your viewpoint, is the wrong tack. My question is phrased in terms of art in general. Afterwards I tied it to the analogy you had offered, because you have been generous enough follow me down the rabbit holes of my thought process (references to Newton's giant metaphor, etc) which I found illuminating (and which had the knock on effect of setting up FormlessOne to make, imo, the winning post of the thread).
 
2012-12-11 01:55:04 PM  

Ishkur: Don't attack the analogy, attack the meaning. (this is why I hate using analogies)


I've appreciated you humoring me so far, and if you're tired of it, I take no offense. But I imagine statements like that are most often employed to evade questions for which no satisfying answer is forthcoming.

As for your comment on analogies, allow me to make an analogy between people who hate using analogies, and programmers who hate using untyped languages: Yes, it's easy to get into trouble if you don't know what you're doing. On the other hand, if you can handle the increased ambiguity you gain the leverage of the power of your intution, which is often substantial.
 
2012-12-11 02:01:33 PM  

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: But is there an authenticity to be found in his performances, even if not in the way *he* intended?


Maybe that doesn't do him enough credit. Can the deliberate inauthenticity of his performances, on one level, not be the essence of a deliberately authentic performance, on another level?
 
2012-12-11 02:12:51 PM  
Or to put it another way, you seem to be saying authenticity is a first-order concept, whereas I am trying to make the case it *can be* (whether or not it often is, in practice) a second-order concept, putting forward Andy Kaufman as evidence.
 
2012-12-11 02:14:53 PM  

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: So, things were kayfabe, *to him*. But is there an authenticity to be found in his performances, even if not in the way *he* intended?


No.

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: Choosing to interpret my question as an attack


You can attack or question all you like, that's not the issue (I'm not offended). The issue was you addressed the analogy directly. Don't do that.
 
2012-12-11 02:18:03 PM  

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: I've appreciated you humoring me so far, and if you're tired of it, I take no offense. But I imagine statements like that are most often employed to evade questions for which no satisfying answer is forthcoming.


No, it's because you went down a tangent that's not germaine to the discussion. I hate using analogies and I refrain as much as possible from using them or addressing them (and I really shouldn't have with the Newton comment). I usually have a small disclaimer for situations like these:


Never use an analogy as an argument. Never use an analogy to replace an argument. That leads to strawmen, side tangents and sub-arguments that have nothing to do with your actual argument. It's okay to use an analogy if the other side misunderstands you, to clarify things, but never as the argument itself nor the main thrust of the argument.

Analogies are not arguments. They are red herrings, usually weighted in the argument's favor. This is a common tactic among all theologians, charlatans and hustlers, to argue in parables and analogies instead of facts. Don't derail the discussion.
 
2012-12-11 02:21:05 PM  

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: Or to put it another way, you seem to be saying authenticity is a first-order concept, whereas I am trying to make the case it *can be* (whether or not it often is, in practice) a second-order concept, putting forward Andy Kaufman as evidence.


No, because then you risk running into an infinite regress fallacy. I mean, why stop at two?

It either is what it is, or what it is not. Adding any further clauses or propositions to that order of logic does nothing, goes nowhere, helps no one, and doesn't clarify any point you think you're trying to make. In fact, if anything it confuses the point further with bamboozling sophistry.
 
2012-12-11 02:27:06 PM  
Where I am going with this, is to the idea of the theatre of everyday social interaction. Why can't performances in that realm exhibit the same features as artists such as Kaufman, i.e. operate on the meta-level?

I'm not saying every hipster is an unfamous Andy Kaufman, but that there could be proto-Kaufman's among them. In other words, some hipsters may be authentically inauthentic meta-hipsters, or may be in the process of becoming such, and therefore the phenomenon of hipsterism is not as culturally barren as is most often supposed, even if the terrain frequently resembles a desert. And also that the capacity for deliberate artistic creation is not necessarily closed off to them.

Another point is, that whether or not deliberate artistic creation is closed off to them, inadvertent or unclassified art (I'm referring here to your collage/painted example) must certainly not be closed off.
 
2012-12-11 02:40:12 PM  
www.sitcomsonline.com
 
2012-12-11 02:44:56 PM  

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: So consistency between what kind of artist you consider yourself to be, the process you use to create the art, and how you categorize the result...is that authenticity? Such a person could still be an original collage-is, in the eyes of other collage-ists, even if they don't consider themselves to be one.


Ishkur: The issue was you addressed the analogy directly.


Feel free to ignore the second sentence if you prefer. I believe I've explained in my last post (submitted subsequent to which I am now replying) how the question is germane to the discussion.

Ishkur: No, because then you risk running into an infinite regress fallacy. I mean, why stop at two?


Mathematicians don't seem to have a problem with higher-order logics, but two levels often permits sufficient expressivity for the statements humans are likely to make in conversation.

Ishkur: a tangent that's not germaine to the discussion


I would consider being forced to defend the germaneness of my questions to be a tangent that's not germane to the discussion. Is the germaneness of any particular statement in a discussion between two or more parties not determined collaboratively? Am I unworthy to be given any benefit of the doubt? If not, in that case, could you at least give me some clear direction as to what *is* germane, in your opinion?
 
2012-12-11 02:46:58 PM  

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: Where I am going with this, is to the idea of the theatre of everyday social interaction


Well, that's certainly true. People behave differently depending on the level of social interactivity. For instance:

- With their teammates in the locker room (lots of racist/sexist/vulgar language)
- With their friends on the street (lots of idioms, slang, and in-jokes)
- With their lover in the bedroom (lots of compassion, caring and understanding their needs)
- With their family during holiday dinners (lots of clean-cut, pious, polite mannerisms)
- With their boss at the office (lots of professional, businesslike rote behavior)

There we go: Five entirely different personality frameworks that probably everyone has, but would be completely inappropriate in any setting other than their own. People have to adopt the mores and norms of whatever the environment suggests. But as you move through and adapt the mode of behavior to each of these sub-cultural social tribes, which one is the real, authentic you? Well, they all are, as they have been acquired from years of experience and you use them because that is the best way to interface with that environment. Manners, ethics and all that.

From my understanding, I don't think hipsters do that. They tend to act the same way no matter what social situation they are in, because they think deviation from whatever core trait they're aping would be seen as inauthentic.... even though the core trait itself is inauthentic.

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: some hipsters may be authentically inauthentic meta-hipsters, or may be in the process of becoming such, and therefore the phenomenon of hipsterism is not as culturally barren as is most often supposed, even if the terrain frequently resembles a desert.


So, basically, you're saying that nothing is still a thing.
 
2012-12-11 02:49:30 PM  

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: Mathematicians don't seem to have a problem with higher-order logics, but two levels often permits sufficient expressivity for the statements humans are likely to make in conversation.


Yes, but we're not talking about mathematics, we're talking about the ability for people to conceptualize a trend.
 
2012-12-11 02:50:37 PM  

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: I would consider being forced to defend the germaneness of my questions to be a tangent that's not germane to the discussion. Is the germaneness of any particular statement in a discussion between two or more parties not determined collaboratively? Am I unworthy to be given any benefit of the doubt? If not, in that case, could you at least give me some clear direction as to what *is* germane, in your opinion?


^^^ These are all tangents. Back on track, folks.
 
2012-12-11 03:01:08 PM  

Ishkur: So, basically, you're saying that nothing is still a thing.


No, I'm saying there is such a thing as a desert rose.

The *idea* of nothing (that lives in a human brain) is a thing, although that's not the same as the nothingness it is trying to refer to.

A performance can be inauthentic. That inauthenticity may resonate within me. I take the *idea* of that inauthenticity, and mime it, to create my own sincere performance that to many if not all observers exhibits an inauthenticity indistinguishable from the original performance. Whether Kaufman did that or not (I think he did), any person so inclined could make such a performance. A sincere inauthentic performance is one that is possible to make. By setting out to make such a performance deliberately, one could express authenticity.
 
2012-12-11 03:02:31 PM  
Ah yes, the elusive triple post pontificating in its native environment, the Hipster Thread.
 
2012-12-11 03:05:22 PM  

Ishkur: ^^^ These are all tangents. Back on track, folks.


If that post wasn't made ironically, then I have no idea what to think of you.
 
2012-12-11 03:07:26 PM  

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: A performance can be inauthentic. That inauthenticity may resonate within me. I take the *idea* of that inauthenticity, and mime it, to create my own sincere performance that to many if not all observers exhibits an inauthenticity indistinguishable from the original performance. Whether Kaufman did that or not (I think he did), any person so inclined could make such a performance. A sincere inauthentic performance is one that is possible to make. By setting out to make such a performance deliberately, one could express authenticity.


Yes, I believe we call it Poe's Law -- one man's [inauthentic] satire is another man's [authentic] extremism.

Fine. But hipsters don't do that.
 
2012-12-11 03:08:38 PM  

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: If that post wasn't made ironically, then I have no idea what to think of you.


You're the hipster. You tell me.
 
2012-12-11 03:13:40 PM  
The idea is that the authentically inauthentic performance is a different kind of performance than the one it is based on. To evalulate it as not having been artistically created, because it does not fit the expected cateogry (i.e. "that collage of paintings is not authentic, because you claim to be a painter, even though what you've made is not a painting!"). I think it's germane to point out here that Kaufman didn't consider himself to be a comedian, although he was referred to as one.

This goes back to my question of whether a taxonomy of art is necessary to specify authenticity, and what to do when things don't fit your taxonomy.
 
2012-12-11 03:16:26 PM  

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: The idea is that the authentically inauthentic performance is a different kind of performance than the one it is based on. To evalulate it as not having been artistically created, because it does not fit the expected cateogry (i.e. "that collage of paintings is not authentic, because you claim to be a painter, even though what you've made is not a painting!"). I think it's germane to point out here that Kaufman didn't consider himself to be a comedian, although he was referred to as one.

This goes back to my question of whether a taxonomy of art is necessary to specify authenticity, and what to do when things don't fit your taxonomy.


You really like the word germane.
 
2012-12-11 03:16:42 PM  

Ishkur: s, I believe we call it Poe's Law -- one man's [inauthentic] satire is another man's [authentic] extremism.


Poe's Law is inauthentic satire built on authentic extremism. I'm talking about the opposite -- an authentic performance built on inauthentic satire.
 
2012-12-11 03:17:47 PM  

sp86: You really like the word germane.


I like to ham it up. Apparently it's what hipsters do.
 
2012-12-11 03:25:50 PM  

Ishkur: You're the hipster. You tell me.


I would find it hard to believe if you weren't. On the other hand I found it hard to believe that you couldn't conceive the question that I had asked wasn't germane, so clearly I'm not the best person to ask.
 
2012-12-11 03:26:47 PM  

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: I'm talking about the opposite -- an authentic performance built on inauthentic satire.


Okay, but hipsters don't do that.
 
2012-12-11 03:34:14 PM  

Ishkur: Okay, but hipsters don't do that.


Apparently you consider me a hipster, so if I do that haven't I proven you wrong? 

Or does it matter whether or not I objectively am a hipster, irrrespective of what you think?

If I were to make an authentically inauthentic performance, say by playing devil's advocate for the sake of an interesting discussion, would you revise your definition of hipster or your classification of me as a hipster?

If you're always willing to do the latter whenever anyone violates your definition of what a hipster is, then your definition is essentially a smokescreen for your subjective opinion.

I submit that it would be easier and in better service of the beautiful definition provided by Millenium, to incorporate the existence of meta-hipsters into your definition.

/that's all I've got
 
2012-12-11 03:48:45 PM  
This whole discussion between you two seems to amount to mutual taxonomic masturbation.
 
2012-12-11 03:52:18 PM  

sp86: This whole discussion between you two seems to amount to mutual taxonomic masturbation.


Which would make you the pervy voyeur.

/hands in the air!
//I meant both hands
 
2012-12-11 03:57:12 PM  

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: sp86: This whole discussion between you two seems to amount to mutual taxonomic masturbation.

Which would make you the pervy voyeur.

/hands in the air!
//I meant both hands


Well played.
 
2012-12-11 04:11:46 PM  

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: Apparently you consider me a hipster, so if I do that haven't I proven you wrong?


No, because nobody cares what hipsters think.

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: If I were to make an authentically inauthentic performance, say by playing devil's advocate for the sake of an interesting discussion, would you revise your definition of hipster or your classification of me as a hipster?


If you are playing devil's advocate for the sake of interesting discussion then by default you are being inauthentic no matter how sincere you make your argument.

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: I submit that it would be easier and in better service of the beautiful definition provided by Millenium, to incorporate the existence of meta-hipsters into your definition.


You could, but that would be redundant.

The problem with meta-hipsters is they are insecure miscreants with a heavy penchance for never committing to any convictions or values. What I mean by that is, they are deathly afraid of being sincere about anything for fear that their sincerity will be ridiculed by other hipsters (and it would because hipsters are antisocial like that).

It requires a certain level of vulnerability and courage to stick up for something that you genuinely believe in irrespective of its worth, value, or criticism. Having convictions is something that regular hipsters sorely lack so the applied attitude of meta-hipsters in any situation is to never be sincere. They (usually) call it trolling, but it's really just typical post-teenage insecurity.
 
2012-12-11 04:41:20 PM  

Ishkur: No, because nobody cares what hipsters think.


Lol!

Ishkur: If you are playing devil's advocate for the sake of interesting discussion then by default you are being inauthentic no matter how sincere you make your argument.


Of course, in some sense. The unaddressed point is whether there are other valid senses than the superficial one. There's more to life than can be expressed using first-order predicate logic.

Ishkur: The problem with meta-hipsters is they are insecure miscreants with a heavy penchance for never committing to any convictions or values.


Other than hipsterism, that is.

Ishkur: What I mean by that is, they are deathly afraid of being sincere about anything for fear that their sincerity will be ridiculed by other hipsters (and it would because hipsters are antisocial like that).


That has the ring of truth.

Ishkur: It requires a certain level of vulnerability and courage to stick up for something that you genuinely believe in irrespective of its worth, value, or criticism.


I believe in the value of principled argument, and in the objective reality of ideas (although not necessarily the things to which they attempt to refer), and that a language capable of expressing statements about statements is at a minimum necessary to have any hope of getting a handle on truth.

Ishkur: They (usually) call it trolling, but it's really just typical post-teenage insecurity.


And here I thought it was just pre-resigned-to-my-fate openmindedness.
 
2012-12-11 05:03:59 PM  

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: The unaddressed point is whether there are other valid senses than the superficial one.


Not when we're talking about hipsters.

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: Other than hipsterism, that is.


No hipster ever admits to being a hipster. To do so is to disavow being a hipster.

The Voice of Sarcastic Reason: I believe in the value of principled argument, and in the objective reality of ideas (although not necessarily the things to which they attempt to refer), and that a language capable of expressing statements about statements is at a minimum necessary to have any hope of getting a handle on truth.


That's funny. As hipsters go, you're an alright dude.
 
2012-12-11 05:11:23 PM  

Ishkur: at's funny. As hipsters go, you're an alright dude.


Cheers to you, and thanks for the discussion.

/I would pay monies to get Millenium's opinion of all this
 
2012-12-11 07:26:10 PM  
I posted in this thread before it became popular.
 
2012-12-11 08:50:03 PM  
How many hipsters does it take to screw in a lightbulb?

Eh, nevermind, it's some obscure number you've never head of.
 
2012-12-11 09:03:40 PM  

Notabunny: spacemanjones: Notabunny: spacemanjones: Who gives a fluck what people spend their money on? It's their money. You buy shti that I would never buy and I'm sure I buy shti you would never buy. Big deal. Get over yourselves.

you said "shti" twice

Shti, sorry.

I just figured you like shti


Bienvenue chez les shtis
 
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