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(Gizmag)   Collector selling every US Super Nintendo game for $20,000   (gizmag.com) divider line 78
    More: Cool, SNES, Royal Ontario Museum, selling  
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4060 clicks; posted to Geek » on 09 Dec 2012 at 11:22 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-10 03:45:53 AM
The ironic thing is...there is nothing cool about owning $20,000 worth of Nintendo games.
 
2012-12-10 07:13:16 AM

thamike: That's nice, but there's only

none that's worth playing.
 
2012-12-10 09:55:33 AM
Each?
 
2012-12-10 11:10:31 AM
I just recently finished fitting out XBMC media server with NES, SNES, GBA, N64, PS1, PS2, Gamecube etc. emulators and 'digitized' my game collections.

The temptation was there to grab those torrents that are "All 7,000 SNES games!" or whatever but I knew that huge game lists would make decisions too difficult and browsing too long and I'd never play 98% of them, so I only included games I actually had physically or wanted to. I did get a few that I'd never owned, but still had most. In the case of PS1 and PS2 I could actually rip the game discs myself.

I'll have to take some screenshots sometime, it's awesome. Browse with a coverflow GUI like album covers with the game boxes, and group all consoles together. So when you browse through my collection (~200 games total), there are sections like:

Super Mario Bros 1 > 2 > 3 > World > Yoshi's Island > 64 > Sunshine > Mario Land 1,2,3
Final Fantasy 1 -> 12, on original consoles each
Mega Man 1-10 (with 2 Wii WADs for 9 and 10), X1 - X6, Legends 1+2, Zero 1-4, Game Boy IV and V
Castlevania 1,2,3 Super 4, SotN, All 3 GBA games
Silent Hill 1,2,3,4, Origins

And I've synced up all the configs for the various emulators so I can use my USB controller to browse XBMC, launch games, play them, and quit back to menu seamlessly across all consoles. Also store games/saves on my NAS so all PCs in house can access and resume where I left off.

It's like childhood Sega Channel on crack, it owns.

/Just beat Crash Bandicoot 2 and Tomb Raider 1 last weekend, my PS3 will never be turned on again
 
2012-12-10 11:14:05 AM

bossuniversalAA: The ironic thing is...there is nothing cool about owning $20,000 worth of Nintendo games.


this right here. fact is, these things are neither valuable NOR rare. this is NOT a good investment whatsoever - especially since in about 2 more generations we will run out of people nostalgic enough for the old systems to give them any value at all.

carts became worthless once emulation became perfect (or close to it). there are collectors out there willing to pay at this point, I'd wager, but this isn't like buying an few golden or silver age comics. the value can do little but decrease. i see this on "American Pickers" and sometimes to a degree on "Pawn Stars" - people will bring in some old item, it is in great shape, and at one time would have commanded a good price, but the collectors that would have had interest are all dead bringing a once valuable item to basically zero value.
 
2012-12-10 11:20:22 AM

Electromax: I just recently finished fitting out XBMC media server with NES, SNES, GBA, N64, PS1, PS2, Gamecube etc. emulators and 'digitized' my game collections.

The temptation was there to grab those torrents that are "All 7,000 SNES games!" or whatever but I knew that huge game lists would make decisions too difficult and browsing too long and I'd never play 98% of them, so I only included games I actually had physically or wanted to. I did get a few that I'd never owned, but still had most. In the case of PS1 and PS2 I could actually rip the game discs myself.

I'll have to take some screenshots sometime, it's awesome. Browse with a coverflow GUI like album covers with the game boxes, and group all consoles together. So when you browse through my collection (~200 games total), there are sections like:

Super Mario Bros 1 > 2 > 3 > World > Yoshi's Island > 64 > Sunshine > Mario Land 1,2,3
Final Fantasy 1 -> 12, on original consoles each
Mega Man 1-10 (with 2 Wii WADs for 9 and 10), X1 - X6, Legends 1+2, Zero 1-4, Game Boy IV and V
Castlevania 1,2,3 Super 4, SotN, All 3 GBA games
Silent Hill 1,2,3,4, Origins

And I've synced up all the configs for the various emulators so I can use my USB controller to browse XBMC, launch games, play them, and quit back to menu seamlessly across all consoles. Also store games/saves on my NAS so all PCs in house can access and resume where I left off.

It's like childhood Sega Channel on crack, it owns.

/Just beat Crash Bandicoot 2 and Tomb Raider 1 last weekend, my PS3 will never be turned on again


stop living in the past, dude. on the one hand, what you have done here is very cool. on the other you have spent tons of time building a device to play old ass games that have been since far better. I like old games as well as the next guy and spend some time collecting old consoles and games.... until I realized that I NEVER played the old stuff to any real end any longer because.... man, it is hard to go back.

also - it ain't gonna get you laid, dude.
 
2012-12-10 11:23:20 AM
device to play old ass games that have been since far better bettered.


there, FTFM
 
2012-12-10 11:27:52 AM

frepnog: stop living in the past, dude. on the one hand, what you have done here is very cool. on the other you have spent tons of time building a device to play old ass games that have been since far better. I like old games as well as the next guy and spend some time collecting old consoles and games.... until I realized that I NEVER played the old stuff to any real end any longer because.... man, it is hard to go back.

also - it ain't gonna get you laid, dude.


Meh, different strokes. I play the old stuff a lot more, I couldn't get into any of the recent modern games I bought (Batman Arkham City, Dragon's Dogma, RE6) but I've played the "old ass games" regularly since middle school. Moving into the phase of my life where I stop keeping up with the New and settle in with the Familiar when I do my gaming, usually with a side of bud for relaxing. Video games IS my favorite way to revisit the past, some people read books or movies from their childhood, I like da games. Probably only play a few hours a week nowadays.

For any others with a media server, FWIW, I'd estimate it took me about 8 hours over the course of a weekend to download the emulators and rip the games/download the carts. I used a free service akin to XBMC's scrapers for movies and TV to auto-grab the box front and back and a short gameplay video that plays as you browse, didn't have to do that myself.

Also I've had a live-in girlfriend for two years, but when I'm courting the ladies you're crazy if you think they'd get any whiff that this setup exists :)
 
2012-12-10 11:29:52 AM

frepnog: bossuniversalAA: The ironic thing is...there is nothing cool about owning $20,000 worth of Nintendo games.

this right here. fact is, these things are neither valuable NOR rare. this is NOT a good investment whatsoever - especially since in about 2 more generations we will run out of people nostalgic enough for the old systems to give them any value at all.

carts became worthless once emulation became perfect (or close to it). there are collectors out there willing to pay at this point, I'd wager, but this isn't like buying an few golden or silver age comics. the value can do little but decrease. i see this on "American Pickers" and sometimes to a degree on "Pawn Stars" - people will bring in some old item, it is in great shape, and at one time would have commanded a good price, but the collectors that would have had interest are all dead bringing a once valuable item to basically zero value.


Yea, antiques don't hold any value once they are functionally replaceable. Maybe to a few people who were alive when they weren't antique and thus have a nostalgia for their own past. But who collects anything functionally worthless that existed before they were born?

On a less sarcastic note, collections are a labor of love first and an investment second. Depending on how much money one makes, 20,000 isn't a lot of money especially if spent over a decade.
 
2012-12-10 11:31:26 AM

frepnog: I like old games as well as the next guy


Obviously not.
 
2012-12-10 11:55:27 AM

Smackledorfer: frepnog: I like old games as well as the next guy

Obviously not.


paying 20000 dollars for a collection that can be functionally had for if not a fraction of then practically for free is ridiculous on its face, especially when nothing in the collection has any real intrinsic value other than nostalgia. Most of the collection is total unadulterated garbage. It was garbage at release and is just OLD garbage now. This is not like collecting old comics that have real intrinsic value (first batman, first spiderman, first xmen, ect and ACTUAL rarity), this is not like collecting rare coins made of precious metals.

this is collecting plastic and cardboard, because the actual part of the cart that is worth anything at all is the data encoded on it, and that data is freely available. video game collectors are farking INSANE. that old Atari cart Air Raid that sold for like 40 grand is a prime example - someone payed 40 grand for a blue plastic turd, a cart with no real intrinsic value OTHER than nostalgia.

Nostalgia is a dangerous thing to collect by. You will get ripped off.

This collection, at 20000 dollars, is a massive rip off.
 
2012-12-10 12:10:22 PM

frepnog: this is collecting plastic and cardboard, because the actual part of the cart that is worth anything at all is the data encoded on it,


So you understand nothing of collecting then?

Look, I'm not saying I would pay for it, nor does having something in the box, or with a worthless piece of paper or all the other little add-ons that drive antique/collector pieces up in value mean shiat to me. But I do recognize that there is clearly a portion of the population who DOES value those things, and denying that is foolish.

If you want to say there is no intrinsic value to collectors items and antiques, that is fine. If you want to say there is no value to collectors items and antiques, then you are a moran.


And the reason I say you don't like old games as much as the next guy is because there ARE people who like them more than you: both from a collection perspective AND from a playing them perspective which you say you never play.

I would never spend a significant amount of cash on these things personally, but I do still play my NES. It looks surprisingly good on a 65 inch tv.
 
2012-12-10 12:46:58 PM

Smackledorfer


Smartest
Funniest

2012-12-10 11:29:52 AM

frepnog: bossuniversalAA: The ironic thing is...there is nothing cool about owning $20,000 worth of Nintendo games.

this right here. fact is, these things are neither valuable NOR rare. this is NOT a good investment whatsoever - especially since in about 2 more generations we will run out of people nostalgic enough for the old systems to give them any value at all.

carts became worthless once emulation became perfect (or close to it). there are collectors out there willing to pay at this point, I'd wager, but this isn't like buying an few golden or silver age comics. the value can do little but decrease. i see this on "American Pickers" and sometimes to a degree on "Pawn Stars" - people will bring in some old item, it is in great shape, and at one time would have commanded a good price, but the collectors that would have had interest are all dead bringing a once valuable item to basically zero value.

Yea, antiques don't hold any value once they are functionally replaceable. Maybe to a few people who were alive when they weren't antique and thus have a nostalgia for their own past. But who collects anything functionally worthless that existed before they were born?

On a less sarcastic note, collections are a labor of love first and an investment second. Depending on how much money one makes, 20,000 isn't a lot of money especially if spent over a decade.


if i had twenty grand to burn i would buy a convertible Cadillac and tour the country with a bag of weed. i collect weird useless shiat too, so i get the whole collecting thing.

i637.photobucket.com
 
2012-12-10 12:55:12 PM

Smackledorfer: frepnog: this is collecting plastic and cardboard, because the actual part of the cart that is worth anything at all is the data encoded on it,

So you understand nothing of collecting then?

Look, I'm not saying I would pay for it, nor does having something in the box, or with a worthless piece of paper or all the other little add-ons that drive antique/collector pieces up in value mean shiat to me. But I do recognize that there is clearly a portion of the population who DOES value those things, and denying that is foolish.

If you want to say there is no intrinsic value to collectors items and antiques, that is fine. If you want to say there is no value to collectors items and antiques, then you are a moran.


And the reason I say you don't like old games as much as the next guy is because there ARE people who like them more than you: both from a collection perspective AND from a playing them perspective which you say you never play.

I would never spend a significant amount of cash on these things personally, but I do still play my NES. It looks surprisingly good on a 65 inch tv.


you miss the point.

the ONLY reason right now that there is a market for old video games is nostalgia. That makes it a prime target for speculators. This artificially drives the value of some "rare" games thru the roof, altho the actual items themselves have no real intrinsic value. Therefore, what you end up with is a few people that pay exorbitant prices for items that have little to no resale value because they think that the item HAS intrinsic value.

This is the very type thing that killed the 90's comic book market, the kind of thing that killed the Beanie Baby market, and is the very thing that will kill the video game market - the items have no intrinsic value and yet are being traded as if they do. When the speculators dry up and there is no one left to pay 40000 dollars for a blue plastic turd, you have tons of items that are worth nickles at the flea market - because the items are IN FACT worth nickels at the flea market.
 
2012-12-10 01:43:42 PM
Anyone talking about intrinsic value relative to collecting old stuff is missing the point.

Stop being obtuse.
 
2012-12-10 01:44:43 PM
Next you will tell us art holds no intrinsic value and therefore an original painting is worthless.
 
2012-12-10 01:51:55 PM

Smackledorfer: Anyone talking about intrinsic value relative to collecting old stuff is missing the point.

Stop being obtuse.


there is a difference between collecting things you like, collecting things that you intend to resale, and paying insane amounts of money for items that are almost worthless.

just because it is old, doesn't mean it is valuable. Just because it is rare, doesn't mean it is valuable.

this is the kind of thing that takes advantage of stupid people. no one buys a 20000 dollar collection because it is something they have always wanted. They do it because "if it is worth 20000 NOW, it will be worth 40000 in a few years!!!!"

um. no.... no, it won't. there will be a finite number of people willing to pay that kind of money for this kind of collection. Once those few have either acquired what they desire or made the money off the purchase that they expected, there is no other measure to say "this is worth 20000".

it is one thing to have collected SNES games since you were a kid in the 90's until you have amassed an impressive collection.

buying THIS collection at one time at this price signifies that you actually think it has true value. It does not, it is a speculator trying to make a payday on cardboard and plastic because there are a few nostalgic idiots out there currently paying too much for old SNES games.
 
2012-12-10 01:53:08 PM
Your list says Breath of Fire 3, a PlayStation game. I think you meant Breath of Fire 2.

If one of you does play BoF2, for the love of god, please play the fan-retranslated version. The official English version sucked hard.

BTW, my Fark handle Myria is the last boss of Breath of Fire 1 and 3, so I'm a fan of the series. =^-^=

/asks byuu questions on his forum
 
2012-12-10 02:03:20 PM
Video games! In case anyone else is interested, if you have ROMs you can use XBMC for free with the Rom Collection Browser add-on:
Pic
Pic
Pic

You can toggle info/video for each:
Pic

You can also filter by console/year/developer/etc:
Pic
 
2012-12-10 02:05:18 PM

Smackledorfer: Next you will tell us art holds no intrinsic value and therefore an original painting is worthless.


holding the intrinsic value of a picasso next to an "in the box" copy of the Atari 2600 cart Air Raid is ridiculous.

i get what you are saying. i do. collecting is a demon all on its own, and as a life long comic collector, I GET YOU.

but..... ask the women in the 90's about their Beanie Baby collection that was going to put little Johnny thru college.

dude - there is a difference here, and you just aren't getting it.

paying this much for something, as a collectible, is AN INVESTMENT. It isn't just "collecting" anymore when you get into thousands of dollars. Investing in old video game carts is flat out stupid and flies in the face of reason.

which is why speculators make mint, and collectors are left holding the bag on worthless crap. Right now video game collecting is HOT... because people my age are finally getting to the point where they make enough money to collect stuff from their youth. This means it is a prime market for speculators to rip people off and inflate values of worthless items to incredible numbers.

however - in ten years or so you will hear things like "the market isn't what it used to be" and things that in 2012 went for 10-20 thousand will be lucky to sell for a couple of hundred IF AT ALL. This will be because the true collectors will already have what they want and the next gen will be kids that grew up with no real attachment to physical media, so a mint in box copy of Chrono Trigger will hold no value to them, especially when they can freely play a copy of that game because the digital information on the cart was dumped eons ago.

does that not make sense to you?
 
2012-12-10 02:15:37 PM
Nothing you say makes sense except for your personal speculation that everyone will stop caring about old games.

Will an snes collection be worth 20k? Maybe not.

Is it a fleeting thing like beanie babies? No.

And art absolutely has the same intrinsic value as an nes game: both have some, but what they have can be replicated, often in a superior manner.

Side note: you ARE aware various old toys beyond nostolgia stuff are still actively collected, right?

/I bet you foam at the mouth watching antiques roadshow. Omgerd no intrinsic value!
 
2012-12-10 02:23:34 PM
Here is the thing, you SAY you understand what I am saying, and yet you insist that you know for sure that video games will be worthless in another generation.

frepnog: especially since in about 2 more generations we will run out of people nostalgic enough for the old systems to give them any value at all.


So if people aren't nostalgic for them, they will be worthless. And yet I can give you examples of all sorts of antique items that are collected, and often end up quite valuable to the right people, when these people have never been alive to have any true nostalgia for them.


I think the problem with your discussion is that you DO agree with me, but you keep using silly hyperbole and speaking in absolutes. Say 20k is too much? Great. Say something that has been known for 30 years and will always be viewed as a historical precursor to modern gaming is the same as beanie babies? Absolutely not.

IF an old game collection were the same as beanie babies then you have to admit that fine art fits the same description. Otherwise you have to admit that there are plenty of aspects of things that add staying power beyond intrinsic value and that you have nothing but a hunch to base your prediction on. And that's fine too.
 
2012-12-10 02:47:53 PM

Smackledorfer: Here is the thing, you SAY you understand what I am saying, and yet you insist that you know for sure that video games will be worthless in another generation.

frepnog: especially since in about 2 more generations we will run out of people nostalgic enough for the old systems to give them any value at all.

So if people aren't nostalgic for them, they will be worthless. And yet I can give you examples of all sorts of antique items that are collected, and often end up quite valuable to the right people, when these people have never been alive to have any true nostalgia for them.


I think the problem with your discussion is that you DO agree with me, but you keep using silly hyperbole and speaking in absolutes. Say 20k is too much? Great. Say something that has been known for 30 years and will always be viewed as a historical precursor to modern gaming is the same as beanie babies? Absolutely not.

IF an old game collection were the same as beanie babies then you have to admit that fine art fits the same description. Otherwise you have to admit that there are plenty of aspects of things that add staying power beyond intrinsic value and that you have nothing but a hunch to base your prediction on. And that's fine too.


well, difference in opinions i suppose. but remember this convo in a few years. video games as outrageously expensive collectibles is a fairly new phenomenon. It is mirrored in the 90's comic collecting fiasco, when suddenly comics that were a best a few years old were selling for gigantic numbers. Best example - a mint condition copy of Spiderman 300 went for HUGE money. Now - that is a comic with a first full appearance of a major villain. It has art by one of the best artists in comics. It was selling for outrageous numbers and seemed like it could do nothing but appreciate in value.

now it is worth 50 bucks at best, maybe a couple hundred if perfect and slabbed (another rip off, by the way) because it was a mass produced comic book with no real rarity, even with the intrinsic value.

that is what games are going thru right now - artificial scarcity and speculators tainting the market because a couple of idiots paid WAY too much for some stupid piece of crap to complete a collection. In a few (maybe as many as ten and possibly as few as 5) years the outrageous prices will settle and what you will be left with is a market with a few couple hundred dollar gems and a landfill of worthless stuff.
 
2012-12-10 02:55:53 PM

frepnog: however - in ten years or so you will hear things like "the market isn't what it used to be" and things that in 2012 went for 10-20 thousand will be lucky to sell for a couple of hundred IF AT ALL. This will be because the true collectors will already have what they want and the next gen will be kids that grew up with no real attachment to physical media, so a mint in box copy of Chrono Trigger will hold no value to them, especially when they can freely play a copy of that game because the digital information on the cart was dumped eons ago.


The difference is that collection and speculative hoarding is usually easier to find in other media because, outside of immediate-term game-dumping (i.e. used video game sales), video games have no easy examples of return on investment. And obviously, by the nature of their design, you're probably not likely to throw away video games (i.e. electronics) like you were comic books or baseball cards (i.e. worthless paper). (But hey, everyone did get rid of the boxes, which is why they carry such a premium!) There are still huge numbers of people sitting on these games, which is obviously keeping the value of common titles down. Video games are largely the antithesis of a speculator's market. You can already see the price of "uncommon" titles for systems in that "disposable income" range (Japanese Role-Playing Games for the Super Nintendo, especially Chrono Trigger and Earthbound) already beginning to skyrocket, and that would definitely be a reflection of interest in those titles. And yes, there is a lot of behavior that is irrational, especially as it applies to rare but otherwise worthless games (the most valuable NES games pretty much epitomize this circlejerk). But it would seem to me that if you're patient and capable of sitting on the right games (particularly now, when the supply of various games is getting cut drastically short by digital distribution), you can flip some money. You're not going to become a billionaire, but you can get something out of it.
 
2012-12-10 03:02:54 PM

frepnog: well, difference in opinions i suppose. but remember this convo in a few years. video games as outrageously expensive collectibles is a fairly new phenomenon. It is mirrored in the 90's comic collecting fiasco, when suddenly comics that were a best a few years old were selling for gigantic numbers. Best example - a mint condition copy of Spiderman 300 went for HUGE money. Now - that is a comic with a first full appearance of a major villain. It has art by one of the best artists in comics. It was selling for outrageous numbers and seemed like it could do nothing but appreciate in value.


Comic book and baseball card companies precisely catered to the speculators in order to make a quick buck, and printed absurd amounts of paper that are unparalleled in the history of the business. (Then the card companies just continued to make that mistake, spreading the paper around an average of fifty-to-sixty trading card sets every year, and completely confusing the average consumer.) Just do note that I completely agree about the price of the rare oddball titles being completely out of whack. Usually, when something becomes an expensive collectible, it's because it has a perception in the popular psyche. If you mention the word "Pepsi Invaders" or "Bubble Bath Babes" to the average person playing video games, they wouldn't have the slightest clue of what it is, nor should they.
 
2012-12-10 03:03:13 PM

Mike_LowELL: frepnog: however - in ten years or so you will hear things like "the market isn't what it used to be" and things that in 2012 went for 10-20 thousand will be lucky to sell for a couple of hundred IF AT ALL. This will be because the true collectors will already have what they want and the next gen will be kids that grew up with no real attachment to physical media, so a mint in box copy of Chrono Trigger will hold no value to them, especially when they can freely play a copy of that game because the digital information on the cart was dumped eons ago.

The difference is that collection and speculative hoarding is usually easier to find in other media because, outside of immediate-term game-dumping (i.e. used video game sales), video games have no easy examples of return on investment. And obviously, by the nature of their design, you're probably not likely to throw away video games (i.e. electronics) like you were comic books or baseball cards (i.e. worthless paper). (But hey, everyone did get rid of the boxes, which is why they carry such a premium!) There are still huge numbers of people sitting on these games, which is obviously keeping the value of common titles down. Video games are largely the antithesis of a speculator's market. You can already see the price of "uncommon" titles for systems in that "disposable income" range (Japanese Role-Playing Games for the Super Nintendo, especially Chrono Trigger and Earthbound) already beginning to skyrocket, and that would definitely be a reflection of interest in those titles. And yes, there is a lot of behavior that is irrational, especially as it applies to rare but otherwise worthless games (the most valuable NES games pretty much epitomize this circlejerk). But it would seem to me that if you're patient and capable of sitting on the right games (particularly now, when the supply of various games is getting cut drastically short by digital distribution), you can flip some money. You're not going to become a ...


aha. someone that GETS it.
 
2012-12-10 03:28:35 PM

Mike_LowELL: frepnog: well, difference in opinions i suppose. but remember this convo in a few years. video games as outrageously expensive collectibles is a fairly new phenomenon. It is mirrored in the 90's comic collecting fiasco, when suddenly comics that were a best a few years old were selling for gigantic numbers. Best example - a mint condition copy of Spiderman 300 went for HUGE money. Now - that is a comic with a first full appearance of a major villain. It has art by one of the best artists in comics. It was selling for outrageous numbers and seemed like it could do nothing but appreciate in value.

Comic book and baseball card companies precisely catered to the speculators in order to make a quick buck, and printed absurd amounts of paper that are unparalleled in the history of the business. (Then the card companies just continued to make that mistake, spreading the paper around an average of fifty-to-sixty trading card sets every year, and completely confusing the average consumer.) Just do note that I completely agree about the price of the rare oddball titles being completely out of whack. Usually, when something becomes an expensive collectible, it's because it has a perception in the popular psyche. If you mention the word "Pepsi Invaders" or "Bubble Bath Babes" to the average person playing video games, they wouldn't have the slightest clue of what it is, nor should they.


this is precisely what I was trying to get across to Smackledorfer - a copy of Air Raid for the Atari (for instance) MAY BE rare - but it is a turd, a blue plastic turd, with no real intrinsic value whatsoever.

If original retail copies of System Shock 2 were suddenly going for hundreds or thousands of dollars, at least I could see some value there for collectors. However - it is NOT worth that because not only is it not especially rare, but the digital info on it is too easily and perfectly reproduced to make it valuable, even with the intrinsic value that a good game has. When a complete piece of crap (that track and field game for nintendo that is "worth" a bunch of money, for instance) starts selling for huge money based on nothing but its percieved rarity however, you get a market that is out of whack because people have paid too much money for what is basically a turd.

to be truly valuable, something should be 1. truly rare, 2. truly desirable even if not rare, 3. have intrinsic value beyond its rarity.

most expensive "rare" games currently fail at all of those. No one would give two shiats about track and field for nintendo or air raid OTHER than the fact that it is "rare" because the games themselves are total garbage.
 
2012-12-10 04:39:12 PM
I agree with you. That's why I've spent so much time looking at older, boxed computer video games. Top-of-the-line computer video games would seem like a market worth exploring, but they're hardly in the public consciousness like the consoles and many of the desirable games are nearly impossible to find. (Good luck finding any games made before 1990, anything which was just "floppy disks in a plastic bag", or any boxed edition of something that elsewise used a direct-to-mail distribution model.) It strikes me amazing that I could get a fully-boxed copy of Descent II for 25 bucks. But yeah, that's the idea. In computer video games, there are tons of "extremely rare and impossible-to-find games". That doesn't make them worth anything. For whatever reason, impossible-to-find Atari 2600 games command huge premiums simply because they're bound to the media format. All of this in spite of the fact that like the computer video game market, anyone could make a game for the platform.

The mythos behind those games make little sense. The T-206 Honus Wagner is valuable because a hall-of-fame baseball player told the cigarette manufacturer he didn't want his likeness associated with tobacco, and production of his card was cut short. The 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle is valuable because 1) despite the presence of the 1951 Bowman, it is viewed as a true Mantle rookie card, 2) was included in the late-season "High Series" release that usually commanded fewer sales, and 3) the creator of the set rented out a garbage boat and sent several hundred cases of the 1952 Topps High Series into the Atlantic Ocean. Action Comics #1 is obviously the first appearance of an iconic media figure, but most comic books of the era were scrapped because 1) they were never considered to have any value in the first place, and 2) were one of the first kinds of paper salvaged for World War II. (The comic books had ads imploring readers to scrap materials as part of the war effort, so what do you think got scrapped?) And meanwhile, Stadium Events is popular because its shelf life was cut short and transformed into a peripheral that doesn't get half the attention of the Zapper or even the Power Glove. That's a bubble if I ever saw one.
 
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