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(BBC)   Childlessness linked to early death, though chances are you'll die happy   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 158
    More: Interesting, Journal of Epidemiology, community health  
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4266 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Dec 2012 at 8:24 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-09 11:57:04 AM  

cryinoutloud: Girion47: You have veins bursting in parents' brains right now.
I swear people with kids HATE those of us without kids. It's all snide remarks and "who will take care of you when you're older?"

I was never even aware of this strange persecution complex until I read about it on Fark. But now that I know about it--you are all perfectly justified in hating anyone who has kids. You poor things--maybe you can buy something that will soothe your butthurt. You know, with all the money you've saved by not having kids. And if that's not enough, why, just keep acting like a martyr. Someone is bound to care.


Or you could keep on being bitter that you had kids. Either or.
 
2012-12-09 11:58:50 AM  

Goddess of Atheism: My husband and I are childless by choice, and we've been lucky in that nobody has tried minding our business for us -- except one weird friend-of-a-friend I met last summer. She tried the "but if nobody had kids then humanity would die out" argument, and I pointed out you could say the same thing about any choice anybody made -- "You want to be a doctor? But if everybody wanted to be a doctor, we'd all starve to death because there would be nobody to raise our food!" "You want to be a farmer? But if everybody wanted to be a farmer, we'd all die of easily treatable diseases because there would be no doctors!"

She was not amused.


You could always turn it into "If everybody had kids than humanity would have no space to live."
 
2012-12-09 11:59:01 AM  

the ha ha guy: If you like kids, great, but saying it once is enough.


Not even sure how that is possible. I have a friend who lived in Spain for a year. He had an awesome experience - one I appreciate, but will never do myself. I don't get all pissy when he talks about it or suggests I try something like it myself. He invested a part of his life in it and shares how valuable it was. In a similar manner, I've invested in kids and I'm likely to share how that's turning out for me. I do consciously work to make sure it's not all I talk about (particularly with the wife; I can see how it's way too easy to fall into the trap of only relating to each other as parents and losing the arguing politics/movie geekery/bad puns/trivia arguments/etc aspects that make the relationship satisfying) but unless it's just casual chit-chat you're going to hear about the biggest time investment of my life more than once.
 
2012-12-09 12:00:33 PM  
My eldest niece asked me why I didn't have any kids. I told her it was because it was illegal to beat them.
 
2012-12-09 12:01:42 PM  

QT_3.14159: I don't have a problem with people who choose not to have kids. I'm not a big fan of other people's kids either, so I understand where the motivation comes from.


So what makes you think grandchildren are a good fit for you?
 
2012-12-09 12:02:44 PM  

Abox: I always feel like I've committed a social faux pas when I turn a random gathering into a conversation about my interests


What do you talk about then? Seriously, I suck at small talk. I have a standard algorithm - weather, sport headlines - but if it's more than a hi in the hallway, I typically try to get them to talk about their interests. I'd rather hear the minutia of selecting a golf driver than spend an hour chatting about how the East coast winters suck.

What do people talk about if not their interests?
 
2012-12-09 12:09:26 PM  

Surpheon: Abox: I always feel like I've committed a social faux pas when I turn a random gathering into a conversation about my interests

What do you talk about then? Seriously, I suck at small talk. I have a standard algorithm - weather, sport headlines - but if it's more than a hi in the hallway, I typically try to get them to talk about their interests. I'd rather hear the minutia of selecting a golf driver than spend an hour chatting about how the East coast winters suck.

What do people talk about if not their interests?


There's a world of difference between getting other people to talk about their interests, and talking about your own interests (unless they're similar to the group).

If you get other people to talk about their interests, you're an interesting person
If you talk about your interests, you're a boring person
 
2012-12-09 12:16:16 PM  

Surpheon: Abox: I always feel like I've committed a social faux pas when I turn a random gathering into a conversation about my interests

What do you talk about then?



Stuff everyone can relate to. The band playing, the hot chicks at the next table, the food we're eating. If it's a work crowd then rip on work people. It's a lot less of a night killer than 'hey it's winter so can we talk about skiing even though I'm the only one here that skis'. Or in this case, 'hey I like kids so can we talk about kids even though nobody here gives a crap'.
 
2012-12-09 12:17:02 PM  

WhippingBoy: If you get other people to talk about their interests, you're an interesting person
If you talk about your interests, you're a boring person


So I'm always talking to a boring person?
 
2012-12-09 12:21:10 PM  

Laocoon: and alone


This. When the hubs and I got together, we decided we didn't want kids. Six years later we decided that we didn't want to die alone and wanted someone to love and care for so, in return (hopefully), they'll do the same for us in our old age. Our son is the best thing we ever did.
 
2012-12-09 12:21:39 PM  

Abox: Stuff everyone can relate to. The band playing, the hot chicks at the next table, the food we're eating.


That's what I talk to strangers about. Well, twenty years ago when I was rutting. As I said earlier, now it's weather, sports, and oddly cellphones - many folks in my casual circles have a strong iPhone/Android/Crackberry opinion that can get them chatting (but not politics-pissy-strong). Anyhow, that's what I chat with to people who happen to be the same place as me, not friends and family with diverse interests who I make an effort to see.
 
2012-12-09 12:22:37 PM  
QT, while I respect that you are being polite I don't think you get it. You say the childless lives you see are empty or lonely? Who are you to judge that emotion in other?

My wife and I are approaching 40 with no kids and are totally happy. I'm about to start my second business and spent the last 4 years traveling around the world in support of the electric vehicle industry.

Fulfillment is where you find it. My amazing and awesome life would not be possible with children. Either myself or my wife would have to give up our dreams to make it happen and we're not willing to do that. Is it selfish? Maybe a little, but my EV work alone has made the lives of thousands of people better and green'd up a little bit of this planet, so I don't fear for my karma.

One man loneliness is another mans paradise my friend. Have a good one.
 
2012-12-09 12:28:20 PM  

QT_3.14159: The reason I spoke up in this thread at all was the notion that those who are kid-less will die happy.


One of my best friends is a 73 year old man who has never had a wife or kids. He has been on charity trips all around the world, and has saved countless lives, in no small part due to his ability to leave without worrying about his family. He still gets letters, phone calls, and even visits from the people he's helped over the years.

He might not be ecstatic 24/7, but I can assure you he is far happier than my aunt, who was divorced with two kids at 16. Or my coworker, who is raising four kids alone while her husband is running around with some girl he met at a bar. Or my uncle, whose kids all disowned him. Or one of my other friends, whose young kids all hate him because they have taken their mothers side in some decades-long fight over some long forgotten topic. Or my grandfather, who lived next door to his son on one side, and his daughter on the other, yet was dead for two months before anyone found out. And so on.

All in all, the only parent I know who is happy with his life is my Amish neighbor, but that can be attributed just as much to the Amish lifestyle as it can to the children.
 
2012-12-09 12:29:05 PM  

Surpheon: WhippingBoy: If you get other people to talk about their interests, you're an interesting person
If you talk about your interests, you're a boring person

So I'm always talking to a boring person?


There's a difference between responding to someone's queries about yourself, and speaking about yourself unbidden.
 
2012-12-09 12:31:42 PM  

Surpheon: the ha ha guy: If you like kids, great, but saying it once is enough.

Not even sure how that is possible. I have a friend who lived in Spain for a year. He had an awesome experience - one I appreciate, but will never do myself. I don't get all pissy when he talks about it or suggests I try something like it myself. He invested a part of his life in it and shares how valuable it was. In a similar manner, I've invested in kids and I'm likely to share how that's turning out for me. I do consciously work to make sure it's not all I talk about (particularly with the wife; I can see how it's way too easy to fall into the trap of only relating to each other as parents and losing the arguing politics/movie geekery/bad puns/trivia arguments/etc aspects that make the relationship satisfying) but unless it's just casual chit-chat you're going to hear about the biggest time investment of my life more than once.


There's nothing wrong with your friend talking about what a great time he had in Spain; the problem is if he constantly talks about why YOU need to go to Spain, why you'll never be a complete human being unless you go to Spain, why God disapproves of people who choose not to go to Spain, or how he just can't understand how ANYBODY can find life worth living, if it's not lived in Spain.
 
2012-12-09 12:32:47 PM  
The real reason why everyone tells you to get married and have kids: Misery loves company

/married
//has kids
 
2012-12-09 12:32:55 PM  
... And of course, once you've had children, you're not exactly allowed to "change your mind" and realize they're not worth the trouble.

"Tot Mom".
 
2012-12-09 12:36:07 PM  

WhippingBoy: There's a difference between responding to someone's queries about yourself, and speaking about yourself unbidden.


That's not a very useful formula to get to know people. It cleaves too closely to the "shut up and stand against the wall until you can go home" introvert strategy I inherently want to take.
 
2012-12-09 12:36:34 PM  
I have a cell of Jehova's Witnesses in my family. My experience has been that when someone tries desperately to guilt or scare you into joining their group, it's typically for their benefit rather than yours.
 
2012-12-09 12:41:52 PM  

Surpheon: I have a friend who lived in Spain for a year. He had an awesome experience - one I appreciate, but will never do myself. I don't get all pissy when he talks about it or suggests I try something like it myself.


Does he turn other people against you over your choice not to go to Spain, to the extent that you have to cut off contact with them? Does he insult you over your choice to not live in Spain every time he speaks to you? Does he invite you on trips, intending to trick you into being stranded in Spain? Does he send you books, videos, and plane tickets to guilt you into going to Spain? Does he use religious texts to convince you that you're "diseased" for not going to Spain?

If the problem were just a few comments, virtually nobody would be complaining. But this problem has literally destroyed families and friendships, yet these people just keep on until one side either gives in, or dies.
 
2012-12-09 12:43:39 PM  

Goddess of Atheism: the problem is if he constantly talks about why YOU need to go to Spain,


If he did that constantly, it would get boring not offensive. But when he busts out with some version of "You really need to immerse yourself living in a foreign country - it's an amazing experience!" my reaction is not to get all butthurt about him playing 'world traveler bingo' or something but rather to appreciate what he's saying. It is friends like him that make me appreciate that kids are maybe not the end-all of life changing experiences, and if he restricted his enthusiasm for travel out of concern of offending he would be depriving me of that interesting information.

Now that I think about it, all my childless friends have similarly invested at least a portion of their life in something big - travel, starting a business, a political campaign (wait - she has kids now too; damn overachiever), overcoming chronic illness - something.
 
2012-12-09 12:45:31 PM  
Once I finally trained my cats to cook, drive for small errands and clean house and do laundry, I stopped regretting having kids.
 
2012-12-09 12:45:51 PM  

the ha ha guy: Does he turn other people against you over your choice


As a rule, my friends aren't assholes. Neither is my family, although I recognize you can't chose your family so some people do have assholes as family.

It sounds like the problem is more having lousy friends than 'breeders versus kid-haters'.
 
2012-12-09 12:47:59 PM  

Surpheon: WhippingBoy: There's a difference between responding to someone's queries about yourself, and speaking about yourself unbidden.

That's not a very useful formula to get to know people. It cleaves too closely to the "shut up and stand against the wall until you can go home" introvert strategy I inherently want to take.


It's simple (in theory, not practice): make it about the other person, not about yourself. If you can get someone to talk about themselves so that they don't feel like their imposing or pushing themselves on you you'll have a friend for life.

Have you ever just met someone, and in 10 minutes you know everything about their dietary choices, their religious beliefs, and who they think should have won "American Idol" without you actually asking about those things? Those are the boring people.
 
2012-12-09 12:49:10 PM  

Surpheon: Goddess of Atheism: the problem is if he constantly talks about why YOU need to go to Spain,

If he did that constantly, it would get boring not offensive. But when he busts out with some version of "You really need to immerse yourself living in a foreign country - it's an amazing experience!" my reaction is not to get all butthurt about him playing 'world traveler bingo' or something but rather to appreciate what he's saying. It is friends like him that make me appreciate that kids are maybe not the end-all of life changing experiences, and if he restricted his enthusiasm for travel out of concern of offending he would be depriving me of that interesting information.

Now that I think about it, all my childless friends have similarly invested at least a portion of their life in something big - travel, starting a business, a political campaign (wait - she has kids now too; damn overachiever), overcoming chronic illness - something.


You sound mature and self-confident. What the hell are you doing on Fark?
 
2012-12-09 12:57:43 PM  

Surpheon: It sounds like the problem is more having lousy friends than 'breeders versus kid-haters'.


I have plenty of friends who are perfectly happy with their life. None have kids.
 
2012-12-09 01:06:25 PM  
It's entertaining how the cry of "childless couples live empty lives devoid of meaning" are in-effect agreeing with the regressive, evangelical belief system that casts homosexuals as inferior beings. I wonder how many of them even realize what role they play in that argument.
 
2012-12-09 01:36:23 PM  

Fizics: This does not surprise me at all, there is a childless man who lives down the street from my family that is just insufferable about our children practicing their chosen sport in the public street in front of his house. My daughter has just entered competitive singing and is building her endurance by some light sprints up and down the road while practicing her song registers. I realize the man works at night but this is simply unreasonable, some singing and light wind-sprints should absolutely not bother this man but he insists on complaining to her. This is just a case of the "child-free" thinking their rights supersede everyone else's.


Wow. Are you really taking your daughter's side in this scenario? Wow.
 
2012-12-09 01:38:50 PM  

8 inches: Fizics: This does not surprise me at all, there is a childless man who lives down the street from my family that is just insufferable about our children practicing their chosen sport in the public street in front of his house. My daughter has just entered competitive singing and is building her endurance by some light sprints up and down the road while practicing her song registers. I realize the man works at night but this is simply unreasonable, some singing and light wind-sprints should absolutely not bother this man but he insists on complaining to her. This is just a case of the "child-free" thinking their rights supersede everyone else's.

Wow. Are you really taking your daughter's side in this scenario? Wow.


Wow. Are people really responding to an obvious troll? Wow.
 
2012-12-09 01:42:48 PM  

the ha ha guy: I have plenty of friends who are perfectly happy with their life. None have kids.


That's a bit of a non-sequitor. As I thought I'd clearly stated, I also know quite a few happy childless kids. And it may have been a bit implied, but I admire many of their experiences (as they honestly appreciate my kids).

WhippingBoy: What the hell are you doing on Fark?


Just hanging out until the kids go home, which just occurred. So I'm off for now. They're young'ns and having the experience of my nieces growing into teenagers, I know that I have limited time to enjoy the 'center of their universe' days.
 
2012-12-09 01:44:12 PM  

willfullyobscure: the one thing you will miss out on by choosing not to have kids is knowing what true, unconditional love means.


I have a dog. Bonus: she doesn't complain that her squeaky toys are the wrong color, or when I knit her ugly sweaters (aka "dog humiliators".)

I'm only being semi-facetious.
 
2012-12-09 01:57:39 PM  
There are many people's evolutionary lines that need to leave the gene pool. I have no problem with self-darwination.
 
2012-12-09 01:57:46 PM  
For many, raising children is a rewarding experience that they enjoy sharing with others who haven't had that experience.
For many, raising children has been a terrible experience that they share with others as a way of trying to validate a choice that just didn't work out for them the way they thought it would.

My ex-wife wanted kids for the reason that she didn't want to die alone. That's a pretty crappy reason IMO.

/Part of the reason she is ex
//May have kids for better reasons
 
2012-12-09 02:05:00 PM  

QT_3.14159: the ha ha guy: But if your kid chooses to have no children, will you respect his/her decision? Or will you start with all the same complaints that have turned so many of the childless hostile against breeders?

How would you like it if your parents demanded that you NOT have children? How would you like it if they tried to sabotage your every attempt to live life in the way you choose, just to further their own agenda of making you die childless?

That's exactly what it's like for those who are childless by choice. No matter what we do, some busybody is always there to try to run our lives, to try to force us, sometimes violently, to conform to their way of life, just because we have a different opinion on what to do with the rest of our lives.

I have 4 kids. I'm sure that one of them will likely choose not to have kids and I will be sad with them on days they're sad about it and I'll be happy with them when they're happy about it. (yes, both happen - at least in most women who choose not to have kids).

I figure I'm in for grandkids from at least one of my spawn, though. Surely. *crosses fingers*


Where are these people who are sad about their choice to not have children? There is no research at all that supports your claim that women who choose not to have children are 'sad' about their choice. Finding people who have regret about being childfree is not easy.

I have never met someone who was sad about being childfree. On the contrary, they're all happier than the parents I know, who constantly look at the things we have and the places we go and say 'It must be nice.'

Yes, it farking is nice. Why do you think we childfree people don't have kids?

Childfree people are NOT looking wistfully at those with kids and lamenting what we don't have. We are not 'sad' about this.
 
2012-12-09 02:08:50 PM  

heili skrimsli: Childfree people are NOT looking wistfully at those with kids and lamenting what we don't have. We are not 'sad' about this.


Some are. Some aren't.

I don't understand why some people don't realize that everyone is different and has different ideas about what they want out of life.
 
2012-12-09 02:15:30 PM  

trappedspirit: There are many people's evolutionary lines that need to leave the gene pool. I have no problem with self-darwination.


Everybody check off "genetic immortality" on your cards.
 
2012-12-09 02:23:34 PM  
Seriously, same thing. The worst is my cousin's wife. They met on eHarmony. Within a year they were married. Seven months after that, baby.

She won't farking stop with the constant bingo comments. I think this Thanksgiving she actually hit me with everything on the card and she kept trying to shove her baby at me. No, I don't want to hold your baby. That's why I have a drink in each hand.



Print out and take the breeder bingo card to the next family event. Yell "BINGO!" when you have a row or column checked off. Point out to her the ones she missed and/or what would have given you a bingo earlier.

Also, as a female, people are always trying to hand me babies. I find that if I hold them with my arms fully extended from my body and hands flat and open towards the ceiling, that the parents take them back immediately and do not hand them to me again.


How can you die happy without grandchildren?

Really? No old person could possibly be happy without grandchildren? They can't have other interests and goals? At what age does this happen?


the one thing you will miss out on by choosing not to have kids is knowing what true, unconditional love means.

My husband and I have unconditional love. My dog loves me unconditionally. I know people who hate their parents, so a child's love is not unconditional.

When the hubs and I got together, we decided we didn't want kids. Six years later we decided that we didn't want to die alone and wanted someone to love and care for so, in return (hopefully), they'll do the same for us in our old age.


Really? You had a kid because you didn't want to hire a nurse or make some friends? Visit any nursing home to see how likely the kid caring for you in your old age is. Also consider how much time and energy you spent on taking care of YOUR parents.
 
2012-12-09 02:25:35 PM  
I'm 23 and both me and my long term girlfriend know we don't want kids. We would rather have money and go do fun things and play awesome aunt and uncle to our siblings kids.

Unfortunately it is a pain in the ass to find a doctor to perform a vasectomy on a 23 year old. I'll probably need to go to planned parenthood and see if they can find one for me.
 
2012-12-09 02:33:37 PM  

Swoop1809: I'm 23 and both me and my long term girlfriend know we don't want kids. We would rather have money and go do fun things and play awesome aunt and uncle to our siblings kids.

Unfortunately it is a pain in the ass to find a doctor to perform a vasectomy on a 23 year old. I'll probably need to go to planned parenthood and see if they can find one for me.


You could have had them pulled off in an accident.
 
2012-12-09 02:40:19 PM  
So after reading through this thread, the only conclusion I can come to is I'm glad I don't belong to some of your families and/or have some of your friends.

I am 27, I don't have kids, and I can't ever imagine wanting kids.

Sure, this may change in 5 or 10 years, but at the moment, I am content living my life as if I'm in college and doing whatever the hell I want on the weekends. Sleep til noon? Sure. Come home at 3am? No problem. Watch football all day? Fabulous.

No one in my family bothers me even a little about it. None of my friends with kids try to persuade me to find a husband and have kids. Of course they talk about their kids. Why wouldn't they talk about their kids? That is a huge part of their lives. They aren't offended when I talk about the things I do with my life that are important to me, why should I be offended when they do the same? I'm genuinely interested in the things they have to say.

However, if they got preachy, I'm sure I would change my opinion.

I am super pumped about my brother and his wife having a baby. I am going be the cool aunt. I will have the perks of kids without the detriments.
 
2012-12-09 02:43:31 PM  

WhippingBoy: heili skrimsli: Childfree people are NOT looking wistfully at those with kids and lamenting what we don't have. We are not 'sad' about this.

Some are. Some aren't.

I don't understand why some people don't realize that everyone is different and has different ideas about what they want out of life.


So there are people who are just beside themselves with grief because they don't have kids they don't want?

Where?

Remember that childfree is very different than childless.
 
2012-12-09 03:00:15 PM  

Swoop1809: I'm 23 and both me and my long term girlfriend know we don't want kids. We would rather have money and go do fun things and play awesome aunt and uncle to our siblings kids.

Unfortunately it is a pain in the ass to find a doctor to perform a vasectomy on a 23 year old. I'll probably need to go to planned parenthood and see if they can find one for me.


In Greenland the farm women castrate reindeer bucks with their teeth. Just takes a second.
 
2012-12-09 03:04:06 PM  

WhippingBoy: heili skrimsli: Childfree people are NOT looking wistfully at those with kids and lamenting what we don't have. We are not 'sad' about this.

Some are. Some aren't.

I don't understand why some people don't realize that everyone is different and has different ideas about what they want out of life.



There are plenty of childless couples who look at those with kids and wish they could have that life. In fact, they are so common that there's even a special word for them. "Expecting".

There is one subtle difference though. When a childless couple decides that their life would be better with children, they have it within their power to change that.
But when a couple with children decides that their life would be better without children, and act on that desire, they usually end up with a concrete apartment and a headline on Fark.
 
2012-12-09 03:09:26 PM  

heili skrimsli: WhippingBoy: heili skrimsli: Childfree people are NOT looking wistfully at those with kids and lamenting what we don't have. We are not 'sad' about this.

Some are. Some aren't.

I don't understand why some people don't realize that everyone is different and has different ideas about what they want out of life.

So there are people who are just beside themselves with grief because they don't have kids they don't want?

Where?

Remember that childfree is very different than childless.


When I originally made the statement you were replying to I was talking about older women who sometimes regret their choice. I'm not saying they regret it every minute of everyday, but MOST women will have days of regret and grief and wonder what if. These days are more pronounced when their decision was made in sacrifice to their marriage, but I imagine it happens occasionally with those who genuinely don't want kids on their own as well.

Life is not static. We do have regrets. Sometimes we wonder what if.
 
2012-12-09 03:27:00 PM  

WhippingBoy: How do you really know that you're happier without kids if you've never had them.

/I do not like them, Sam-I-Am...


Simply put, I'm not ready to have them. And I think it the responsible thing to do to not have kids until you are good and ready to have them. And that means not pawning off the raising of your children to society at large when it should be your responsibility.

My parents were rotten people; my mother was a manipulative, lazy hag and my father a passive-aggressive. Last I spoke with them two years ago they were miserable and angry at everything and I assume that hasn't changed. I want to assure myself that I am not going to be like them when or if I bring kids into the world because it's the responsible thing to do.
 
2012-12-09 03:29:54 PM  

heili skrimsli: WhippingBoy: heili skrimsli: Childfree people are NOT looking wistfully at those with kids and lamenting what we don't have. We are not 'sad' about this.

Some are. Some aren't.

I don't understand why some people don't realize that everyone is different and has different ideas about what they want out of life.

So there are people who are just beside themselves with grief because they don't have kids they don't want?

Where?

Remember that childfree is very different than childless.


They flock to Fark parenting threads and rabidly post about how wonderful their child-free lives are in a vain attempt to convince themselves that they've made the right decision.
Obviously.
 
2012-12-09 03:31:44 PM  

QT_3.14159: I'm not saying they regret it every minute of everyday, but MOST women will have days of regret and grief and wonder what if.


There's no possible way you could know this; you're just embarrassing yourself.
Certainly, it's likely that SOME women will have days of regret, but you're painting with an awfully broad brush.
 
2012-12-09 03:38:29 PM  

Arthen: In other news, infertility linked to many life shortening disorders.


This....

Myself - So far three lumps have been removed due to cancer (I'm only 31), total removal of one breast, a disorder called Ehler-Danlos syndrome and to top it all off - my uterus is malformed, it's bicornuate or heart shaped. Two miscarriages and one pre-term birth daughter that didn't live very long. I wised up and quit but depression is a biatch due to failure in having children (plus crappy childhood and failed marriage). I almost offed myself, spend some time in a mental hospital and then started to put the pieces back together. I don't believe I will live to see 70 and to be frank I don't care. It's not depression - my opinion on dying early is not based in inability to have children. I don't want to end up in nursing home, the current state of things makes it very hard even if you have children for them to take care of you. When the parents are still mobile, it's not much to stop in and check up on them. When they starting needing more hands on care, it gets really hard. Especially if the children have kids of their own to consider. I'd much rather enjoy life to it's fullest (I refuse to let my inability to have kids ruin anymore of my life) and then end my life when I get to the point of needing the care of a nursing home.

My adoptive mother - bi-polar and manic depressive (can't be sure, she never got help, this is based on what my own therapist thinks she had based on the stories of abuse and general craziness in my own childhood). I know she had early menopause since they tried to natural conceive until she was in her early thirties and menopause started and they switched over to adoption. To add to the above mental health problems, my mother was one of the first generations to be raised a part of the quiver-full movement (as was I). The stress on couples that want a child but can't have one is already high due to mainstream pressure. The stress on an infertile women in the quiver-full movement is about 10 times worse. Throw in a husband that grew more and more resentfulness of her every year but couldn't leave her due to their religion. He also beat her, not sure when it all started but I know for a fact it was going on long before I was adopted. No wonder she was never able to get pregnant - it's not always physical problems, mental problems and a rotten home life can also cause a ton of issues.  To be honest I'm surprised my dad hasn't beaten to her death or she hasn't killed herself - and to be frank I really don't care anymore what happens to either of them. They will die alone, enough of my life has been ruined by them.
 
2012-12-09 03:39:30 PM  

WhippingBoy: you're painting with an awfully broad brush.


An equally broad brush is the absolute statement:
heili skrimsli: "Childfree people are NOT looking wistfully at those with kids and lamenting what we don't have. We are not 'sad' about this."

Unless you play dumbass language games like anyone who has a moment of regret is no longer "childfree" but now defined as "childless".

Absolutes are always wrong.
 
2012-12-09 04:21:44 PM  

LouDobbsAwaaaay: trappedspirit: There are many people's evolutionary lines that need to leave the gene pool. I have no problem with self-darwination.

Everybody check off "genetic immortality" on your cards.


That bingo card is about having kids. I am decidedly for certain people getting out of that business altogether. I don't know why you would try and convince other people to have or not have kids any more than you would try and convince other people to eat or not eat meat.
 
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