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(Slate)   NASA's 1970s conceptual drawings of space colonies still looking pretty freaking cool   (slate.com) divider line 10
    More: Interesting, NASA, space colonies, Centrifugal Force, Ames Research Center, drawings, O'Neill, Phil Plait  
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5850 clicks; posted to Geek » on 08 Dec 2012 at 7:26 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-08 06:46:15 PM  
3 votes:
I thought I would be living on one of these. Instead, I have a phone I can play music on. This future sucks.
2012-12-08 09:56:35 PM  
2 votes:
www.slate.com

Why go through the trouble of building a suspension bridge when you are the ones building the lake?
2012-12-09 08:33:50 PM  
1 votes:
I'm thinking someone on the art team went to Pepperdine in Malibu:

www.slate.com

www.pepperdine.edu
2012-12-09 10:27:23 AM  
1 votes:

HindiDiscoMonster: MadRocketScientist: I actually have a copy of the original study from a summer program I attended in 1989. It goes into quite a bit of detail on everything from getting the initial resources into space, mining, refining, and manufacturing of the structure utilizing lunar and/or asteroids for raw materials (it wouldn't be purely prefab sections hauled up from earth), to detailed maintenance requirements of the station once completed. A good read if you're into that sort of thing:

[i.imgur.com image 495x640]

any chance of a pdf?


Looks like NASA's got you covered. The first 2 hits on google for NASA SP-413 are for a .pdf and HTML version of the report.
2012-12-09 09:04:59 AM  
1 votes:
The huge open spaces are silly. One rouge meteoroid and everyone is dead.
2012-12-09 06:32:16 AM  
1 votes:
Of all the retro-future stuff, the graphics from the 70's and early 80's have to be my favorite. The covers on some of the old pulp publications from those days are just awesome. Spaceship design, mostly, with big yellow or orange stripes on a white hull, and a large, single-digit number painted somewhere on the vessel.
2012-12-08 11:08:12 PM  
1 votes:

SN1987a goes boom: Sounds all good and well until the Principality of Zeon starts trying to drop colonies on the planet to force the rest of us to move into space.


images1.wikia.nocookie.net

Approves

/I liked Zechs, better, though
2012-12-08 10:57:30 PM  
1 votes:
I actually have a copy of the original study from a summer program I attended in 1989. It goes into quite a bit of detail on everything from getting the initial resources into space, mining, refining, and manufacturing of the structure utilizing lunar and/or asteroids for raw materials (it wouldn't be purely prefab sections hauled up from earth), to detailed maintenance requirements of the station once completed. A good read if you're into that sort of thing:

i.imgur.com
2012-12-08 07:59:17 PM  
1 votes:

Quantum Apostrophe: Generation_D: And in 2012, they're still not funded.

They still don't make sense either. Fantasy poster art is not engineering, n'en déplaise au Space Nutters. 

It was just an idle daydream. It's not possible, and it never will be. Ever.


Are you the same guy that everything that could be patented has been?
2012-12-08 07:40:13 PM  
1 votes:
Why would you move all that shiat into space when you can use it on another planetary body instead?

ie, Moon colonies are easier than that bullshiat.
 
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