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(Washington Post)   A reporter's eyewitness news story on the aftermath of the Pearl Harbor attack published for the first time 71-years later. Okay technically it's not a "news" story so much as a history lesson now, but it's still very good   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 32
    More: Interesting, Pearl Harbor, news stories, lorry, firebombing  
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4488 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Dec 2012 at 8:33 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-07 05:26:42 PM  
What was the before math on Pearl Harbor? Less eastern influence?
 
2012-12-07 05:49:53 PM  
I was told there would be no after math.
 
2012-12-07 06:53:02 PM  
Should have used the Followup tag.
 
2012-12-07 07:15:52 PM  
God I love this place.
 
2012-12-07 07:17:21 PM  
Think of all the seamen!
 
2012-12-07 08:09:40 PM  
Why do Navy uniforms suck harder than Larry Craig in airport bathroom?
www.washingtonpost.com
 
2012-12-07 08:44:26 PM  
she's a slow writer
 
2012-12-07 08:46:39 PM  

djkutch: Why do Navy uniforms suck harder than Larry Craig in airport bathroom?
[www.washingtonpost.com image 296x391]

It was three years later before the first regulations concerning the EMs' uniform were sent to the Navy. They came from Secretary of the Navy Crowninshield in September 1817 and both a summer and winter uniform were described for general wear throughout the Navy. The summer uniform was described as, "a white duck jacket, trousers and vest." The winter uniform prescribed was similar to that worn by Decatur's men and was to be, "Blue jacket and trousers, red vest, yellow buttons and black hat."

Secretary Crowninshield's regulations also provided that when men were employed in washing the decks they were to be barefooted and have their pants rolled up. From this it has been generally acknowledged that the original purpose of the bell bottoms was to facilitate pulling the bottoms up over the knee when swabbing down the decks. This throws another old idea out the window, namely the school of thought that maintains that bell bottoms were designed so they could easily be slipped off in an emergency when abandoning ship.

Take away the vests from those 1817 uniforms, add a few minor changes and additions such as the rating badges, which were first introduced in 1866, and you have the uniform that today's Navyman wears. A uniform that can be rolled up, packed tightly in a seabag, carried halfway around the world, unrolled and worn without pressing or other maintenance and yet retain a smart appearance.

There is another big advantage to the rolling and packing procedure. You can, with little strain, get all the uniforms you need for an extended tour of duty in one seabag or one small locker aboard ship.


Link
 
2012-12-07 08:47:24 PM  
Math?
 
2012-12-07 09:09:41 PM  

toddalmighty: I was told there would be no after math.


Here ya go:

watchseries.li
 
2012-12-07 09:09:43 PM  
www.antrumdraconis.altervista.org

Before math


25.media.tumblr.com

After math
 
2012-12-07 09:10:52 PM  
Graphic, holy shiat, I cried reading the accounts in the morgue.
 
2012-12-07 09:17:34 PM  
aftermath is one word.
 
2012-12-07 09:25:57 PM  
Wow, quite gripping (this coming from someone who loves reading military history/biographies). That said one little part made me question how much she remembered a week later & how much she made up.

"Charred, ripply walls, as high as the first story, alone remained to give any hint of where the store had been. At the smashed soda fountain was a half-eaten chocolate sundae..."


Half eaten sundae at 7am on a Sunday? Certainly within the realm of possibility but not all that probable.

Still an enormous day in the nation's history. Thanks for the link subby.
 
2012-12-07 10:08:02 PM  

Recoil Therapy


Half eaten sundae at 7am on a Sunday? Certainly within the realm of possibility but not all that probable.


A fair number of military people do not work Monday-Friday, 9-5. When you're doing shift work, you might have the equivalent of breakfast at 5pm or at midnight; basically nothing occurs at what most people would consider a normal time.

Stores and such around military installations tend to support military personnel. I have no problem believing there might have been an unfinished sundae on the counter on a Sunday morning.
 
2012-12-07 10:10:18 PM  
It should probably be noted. after her description of burned houses, that most of the damage to the Honolulu was caused by antiaircraft shells falling back down on the city.
 
2012-12-07 10:10:55 PM  
I really should use preview more.
 
2012-12-07 10:16:05 PM  
After Math, PE.

/dodgeball, mofos!
 
2012-12-07 10:27:25 PM  
Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor?!
 
2012-12-07 10:33:34 PM  
I was previously taught that a red T on the forehead stood for tourniquet. I find it hard to believe that medics were applying tetanus shots...but I guess it's possible.
 
2012-12-07 10:39:52 PM  

toddalmighty: I was told there would be no after math.


curses foiled again!
 
2012-12-07 10:41:43 PM  

Beerbarian: I was previously taught that a red T on the forehead stood for tourniquet. I find it hard to believe that medics were applying tetanus shots...but I guess it's possible.




It's quite possible she was confused, as one doesn't normally find tourniquets in the kitchen.
 
2012-12-07 10:46:12 PM  
"Betty McIntosh"

She typed it out on a Mac...no wonder it took 71yrs of software decoding to figure it out.

/amirite?
 
2012-12-07 10:51:16 PM  
It was very vivid, but in the story itself she says that's the point, she's trying to make an impression on her intended(female) readers.
 
2012-12-07 11:44:07 PM  

Beerbarian: I was previously taught that a red T on the forehead stood for tourniquet. I find it hard to believe that medics were applying tetanus shots...but I guess it's possible.


T=ourniquet. M=orphine. S=hrapnel. A=vulsion (interior). R=adioactive (Washdown).
 
2012-12-08 12:15:06 AM  
More Math: Pearl Harbor is 3500 miles from Japan,2000 miles from the US. If the IJN could go that far to get to Hawaii,it would be very bad if they decided to invade and take it over next time.

As much as a lot of Americans wanted to stay out of war, it was on.
 
2012-12-08 01:03:46 AM  
I was hoping this thread was nothing but "after math" bashing...
 
2012-12-08 02:03:06 AM  

djkutch: Why do Navy uniforms suck harder than Larry Craig in airport bathroom?


I had a pair of WWII-era Navy bells that I wore when I was a teen. They were the most comfortable pants I think I've owned. Two problems: they don't fit well if you're fat and the pockets are almost non-existent.
 
2012-12-08 02:38:42 AM  

Beerbarian: I was previously taught that a red T on the forehead stood for tourniquet. I find it hard to believe that medics were applying tetanus shots...but I guess it's possible.


No. TQ.
 
2012-12-08 03:24:43 AM  

djkutch: Why do Navy uniforms suck harder than Larry Craig in airport bathroom?
[www.washingtonpost.com image 296x391]


1.bp.blogspot.com

25.media.tumblr.com

i.ytimg.com
 
2012-12-08 10:35:45 AM  

Jedekai: Beerbarian: I was previously taught that a red T on the forehead stood for tourniquet. I find it hard to believe that medics were applying tetanus shots...but I guess it's possible.

T=ourniquet. M=orphine. S=hrapnel. A=vulsion (interior). R=adioactive (Washdown).


I'd bet "R" hadn't made it into the military first aid lexicon yet, but I was taught if you marked someone with a "t" you needed to add the time you applied it , so the doctor would know if the limb could be saved
 
2012-12-08 07:11:57 PM  
Betty was a hottie back in her day. Hard to tell, but she probably had sharp knees though.
 
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