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(Kotaku)   Nintendo decides that the best way to protect children from mature games is to only allow the digital version of the games to be purchased after bedtime   (kotaku.com) divider line 48
    More: Strange, Wii U, Nintendo, Europe, adaptations, error messages  
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2072 clicks; posted to Geek » on 07 Dec 2012 at 5:58 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-07 03:23:33 PM  
Dear customer, we would like to let you know that Nintendo has always aimed to offer gameplay experiences suited to all age groups, observing carefully all the relevant regulations regarding content access that are present in the various European countries.
We have thus decided to restrict the access to content which is unsuitable to minors (PEGI) to the 11 P.M. - 3 A.M. time window


Well that's just stupid. Why not put an option to password protect purchases so the kids have to ask mom or dad to download it? Then it'll send a confirmation e-mail to the parent's address (in case the kid somehow figures out the password, at least they know before racking up a huge digital game bill). If they're responsible parents they'll actually read the ratings and decide if it's suitable. All they're doing here is pissing off the gamers who don't have kids and want to purchase a game between normal hours when most people are awake.
 
2012-12-07 03:35:10 PM  
Actually, this isn't a bad idea. Now, my 15 year old wouldn't have a problem staying up past 11 to circumvent the process, but he would have had a hard time doing that at 10-11 years old. It won't stop kids from getting and playing the games they want, but it will ensure a lot of parents are aware of and making decisions about these games.
 
2012-12-07 03:39:10 PM  
So when the latch key kid gets home from school he won't just download it then?
 
2012-12-07 04:12:34 PM  
This isn't a terrible idea because it does make it more difficult for kids to download M-rated games, but I think I prefer scottydoesntknow's approach where download / purchase approval is tied to specific individual authorization.
 
2012-12-07 06:15:47 PM  
This sounds a tad overboard, besides aren't responsible adults sleeping during those hours because they have to you know, work.
 
2012-12-07 06:16:32 PM  
Nintendo did remember that its probably perfectly possible to change the clock on the system, meaning this won't stop kids, right?
 
2012-12-07 06:19:46 PM  

scottydoesntknow: Well that's just stupid. Why not put an option to password protect purchases so the kids have to ask mom or dad to download it? Then it'll send a confirmation e-mail to the parent's address (in case the kid somehow figures out the password, at least they know before racking up a huge digital game bill). If they're responsible parents they'll actually read the ratings and decide if it's suitable. All they're doing here is pissing off the gamers who don't have kids and want to purchase a game between normal hours when most people are awake.


The problem with this (which is still present in Nintendo's implementation) is that it seems to do nothing once the game is already downloaded. It doesn't matter how many hoops you have to jump through to acquire the damn thing if it's ready to play at any time of the day once you have it. All this does is put more steps in the pipeline for casual (adult) gamers.

This is just a token CYA effort by Nintendo. It's ultimately the parent's responsibility to control the exposure mature content to their kids, as they're (theoretically) the best entities to judge when their child is mature enough to handle more adult content. This shouldn't be Nintendo's (or Microsoft's or Sony's) burden.
 
2012-12-07 06:23:57 PM  

ATRDCI: Nintendo did remember that its probably perfectly possible to change the clock on the system, meaning this won't stop kids, right?


When you sign in it automatically resets the console to the correct date/time.
 
2012-12-07 06:25:08 PM  
I was always staying up for the 'late' and late late' shows on television when I was 10 and up.
I don't see this as a deterrent for kids, but it would make me not want to buy the products as an adult.
You want to limit your kids ability to purchase anything, then you need to learn how to do so, as they are able to get whatever they want through the 'schoolhouse mafia'. If you don't know or remember what that is, you had better start learning...
 
2012-12-07 06:25:10 PM  

ATRDCI: Nintendo did remember that its probably perfectly possible to change the clock on the system, meaning this won't stop kids, right?


Doubt it. Oh I imagine the clock has an automatic internet update every time you log on, but as Gearbox found out with the BL2 raid bosses, it's easily disabled.
 
2012-12-07 06:49:39 PM  
So...me, it's just me and my wife, no children ever. I also have to wait until after bedtime before I can have the privileged of downloading an M rated game?

Do kids even have bedtimes anymore??? My sister didn't give her daughters bedtimes until they were in school. My neighbor had her preschool aged daughter outside playing last night around midnight. I've seen kids at Walmart at 2am with their parents grocery shopping on a school night, and I've been stuck behind an SUV in the McDonalds drive thru around midnight while the drive thru worker loaded five or more happy meals into the SUV. I don't think parents believe in bed times anymore.
 
2012-12-07 06:49:51 PM  

Elandriel: This isn't a terrible idea because it does make it more difficult for kids to download M-rated games, but I think I prefer scottydoesntknow's approach where download / purchase approval is tied to specific individual authorization.


Hah! That would involve a parent being...*shudder*...responsible.
 
2012-12-07 06:57:42 PM  
How about you don't give kids your credit card number and free, unsupervised, access to the store?
 
2012-12-07 07:01:32 PM  

Lucky LaRue: but it will ensure a lot of parents are aware of and making decisions about these games.


At the expense of regular adults who don't have kids and want to play these games. Fark off.
 
2012-12-07 07:15:08 PM  
And that's why I'm done with gaming. You can't have both the focus on online capabilities and huge communities AND appease the "think of the children" morons without a huge clusterfark.

There are so many Playstation 2 games I've yet to play. And Sony won't come to my house and tell me I can't play them.
 
2012-12-07 07:16:20 PM  

Flappyhead: ATRDCI: Nintendo did remember that its probably perfectly possible to change the clock on the system, meaning this won't stop kids, right?

Doubt it. Oh I imagine the clock has an automatic internet update every time you log on, but as Gearbox found out with the BL2 raid bosses, it's easily disabled.


i'd bet it's a server side restriction, Unless you change your location, changing the clock won't do anything.
 
2012-12-07 07:24:02 PM  
Nintendo really has me by the balls on this one because there really is no where else I can play zombie shooter games or Call of Duty other than the Wii U!
 
2012-12-07 07:30:57 PM  
Obvious solution? Put more nudity, and homosexual characters in games. Most parents only seem to sit up and take notice of what their kids are playing when there's a chance the might see boobies, or catch teh ghey.
 
2012-12-07 07:45:48 PM  
Don't rule out the possibility that it's the EU regulations that are stupid, not just Nintendo's attempt to conform to them.
 
2012-12-07 07:47:57 PM  
Well, that was the last piece. Not buying a console anymore. All the good games will likely get released on the pc anyway and I don't need to deal with this bs.

/Have a NES still hooked u to the tv
//Playing duckhunt with my too-realistic-for-modern-sensibilities lightgun.
 
2012-12-07 07:54:50 PM  
Nintendo really wants to follow in Sega's footsteps, don't they?
 
2012-12-07 07:58:14 PM  
Dear customer, we would like to let you know that Nintendo has always aimed to offer gameplay experiences suited to all age groups, observing carefully all the relevant regulations regarding content access that are present in the various European countries.
We have thus decided to restrict the access to content which is unsuitable to minors (PEGI) to the 11 P.M. - 3 A.M. time window
 
2012-12-07 07:58:44 PM  

leviosaurus: Flappyhead: ATRDCI: Nintendo did remember that its probably perfectly possible to change the clock on the system, meaning this won't stop kids, right?

Doubt it. Oh I imagine the clock has an automatic internet update every time you log on, but as Gearbox found out with the BL2 raid bosses, it's easily disabled.

i'd bet it's a server side restriction, Unless you change your location, changing the clock won't do anything.


Because who would ever use a proxy?
 
2012-12-07 07:59:35 PM  

Flappyhead: leviosaurus: Flappyhead: ATRDCI: Nintendo did remember that its probably perfectly possible to change the clock on the system, meaning this won't stop kids, right?

Doubt it. Oh I imagine the clock has an automatic internet update every time you log on, but as Gearbox found out with the BL2 raid bosses, it's easily disabled.

i'd bet it's a server side restriction, Unless you change your location, changing the clock won't do anything.

Because who would ever use a proxy?


Kids this is aimed at deterring, obviously.
 
2012-12-07 08:30:00 PM  

jack21221: Lucky LaRue: but it will ensure a lot of parents are aware of and making decisions about these games.

At the expense of regular adults who don't have kids and want to play these games. Fark off.


Dude.. it's Wii. If you are an adult, you should probably get a grown-up console.
 
2012-12-07 08:30:12 PM  
So an adult who lives alone with no children cannot purchase an M rated game until after 11:00 PM? That is utterly absurd. What if they work nights?
 
2012-12-07 08:43:47 PM  
This doesn't happen stateside. So, I guess it just kinda sucks to be a Nintendo fan in Europe.

Lucky LaRue: jack21221: Lucky LaRue: but it will ensure a lot of parents are aware of and making decisions about these games.

At the expense of regular adults who don't have kids and want to play these games. Fark off.

Dude.. it's Wii. If you are an adult, you should probably get a grown-up console.


The Wii U is a "grown-up" console. I'm enjoying mine quite a bit. ZombiU is pretty awesome (and very M-rated), and I can't wait to see what they can do with the GamePad with other games if this is how they're using it at launch.

And I'm not a Nintendo fan. I generally dislike Nintendo's tendency to rehash the same old NES titles over and over. I skipped the Wii entirely. But in this case, I have to say you probably shouldn't judge the first next-gen console to hit the market until you try it. Even if you don't like the games, it's still one of the best devices for Netflix, Hulu Plus, Amazon Video, and Web Browsing on a TV. The web browser is really quite impressive, because it combines the best of touch screen, large screen, and physical controls (analog sticks) to make the experience very smooth and easy to use.

But yes-- ZombiU rocks, and because of the nature of the controls, it's exclusive to the Wii U.
 
2012-12-07 08:46:58 PM  

IlGreven: Elandriel: This isn't a terrible idea because it does make it more difficult for kids to download M-rated games, but I think I prefer scottydoesntknow's approach where download / purchase approval is tied to specific individual authorization.

Hah! That would involve a parent being...*shudder*...responsible.


It would also require Nintendo to know how that farking Internet thing works.

Seriously. Big N's still in the '90s when it comes to network support. Hell, Kali was less of a pain in the ass.
 
2012-12-07 08:50:32 PM  
This is in Europe only. They're touchy about all that violence stuff. Something about something called WW2 or something.
 
2012-12-07 08:58:44 PM  

ReapTheChaos: ATRDCI: Nintendo did remember that its probably perfectly possible to change the clock on the system, meaning this won't stop kids, right?

When you sign in it automatically resets the console to the correct date/time.


ah, I'm just guessed it would similar to a regular computer in that regard

/only reason I had the idea was because the most idiotic asinine glitch I had ever seen (not Skyrim, not even a Bethesda product, but MLB 2K12)
 
2012-12-07 08:59:45 PM  
Translation: "We don't want to spend money producing a product that you can own, lend, or resell. Please give us $60 for the privilege of playing the game instead. all the cool corporations kids are doing it, so it's not like we're screwing you over or anything. Think of the children."
 
2012-12-07 09:15:28 PM  

Ego edo infantia cattus: Translation: "We don't want to spend money producing a product that you can own, lend, or resell. Please give us $60 for the privilege of playing the game instead. all the cool corporations kids are doing it, so it's not like we're screwing you over or anything. Think of the children."


The game is still available to buy a physical copy of in a store.
 
2012-12-07 10:00:46 PM  

leviosaurus: i'd bet it's a server side restriction, Unless you change your location, changing the clock won't do anything.


My thought was to change the timezone east a few zones, or perhaps west and buy it in the morning.
 
2012-12-07 11:10:48 PM  

scottydoesntknow: Dear customer, we would like to let you know that Nintendo has always aimed to offer gameplay experiences suited to all age groups, observing carefully all the relevant regulations regarding content access that are present in the various European countries.
We have thus decided to restrict the access to content which is unsuitable to minors (PEGI) to the 11 P.M. - 3 A.M. time window

Well that's just stupid. Why not put an option to password protect purchases so the kids have to ask mom or dad to download it? Then it'll send a confirmation e-mail to the parent's address (in case the kid somehow figures out the password, at least they know before racking up a huge digital game bill). If they're responsible parents they'll actually read the ratings and decide if it's suitable. All they're doing here is pissing off the gamers who don't have kids and want to purchase a game between normal hours when most people are awake.


Cause Asian!

Sony is not much brighter when it comes to social media / web 2.0 / online gaming....
 
2012-12-07 11:17:17 PM  

Elandriel: This isn't a terrible idea because it does make it more difficult for kids to download M-rated games, but I think I prefer scottydoesntknow's approach where download / purchase approval is tied to specific individual authorization.


I love how everyone thinks it's some officially sanctioned board, but it isn't.

The companies rate the games. They go to a secondary board to see if that rating is "justified".

That secondary board is made up of nothing but the same people, just peer-reviewing the game. It's a crock.

/Amusingly enough, this is an idea concocted by Sega - and they had VERY stringent guidelines on how their ratings worked. The ESRB doesn't.
 
2012-12-08 12:08:09 AM  

Jedekai: Elandriel: This isn't a terrible idea because it does make it more difficult for kids to download M-rated games, but I think I prefer scottydoesntknow's approach where download / purchase approval is tied to specific individual authorization.

I love how everyone thinks it's some officially sanctioned board, but it isn't.

The companies rate the games. They go to a secondary board to see if that rating is "justified".

That secondary board is made up of nothing but the same people, just peer-reviewing the game. It's a crock.

/Amusingly enough, this is an idea concocted by Sega - and they had VERY stringent guidelines on how their ratings worked. The ESRB doesn't.


Same with the MPAA. Clout and cash can do a lot with both organizations.
 
2012-12-08 01:20:49 AM  
60% of pay-per-view porn is ordered during working hours.

That's not me pulling crap out of my arse, that's the Supreme Court's findings.

Most porn is watched while kids are IN SCHOOL.
 
2012-12-08 01:51:51 AM  

Lucky LaRue: Dude.. it's Wii. If you are an adult, you should probably get a grown-up console.


No More Heroes would like a farkin' word with you.
 
2012-12-08 01:57:06 AM  
Why the strange tag instead of stupid? Nothing stops kids, who have infinite planning time, from creeping downstairs to get the forbidden games, like telling kids where christmas presents are hid
 
2012-12-08 02:40:56 AM  
I'm sure it matters for the Wii U's 5 games.
But hey, in 3 years there will be 5,000 of them and 3 of them will be good.

/Wii was such wasted potential
 
2012-12-08 05:32:24 AM  

God-is-a-Taco: I'm sure it matters for the Wii U's 5 games.
But hey, in 3 years there will be 5,000 of them and 3 of them will be good.

/Wii was such wasted potential


Umm, your troll kinda falls apart when the Wii U had one of the biggest launch lineups of any console ever. Seriously. 29 Launch titles in the US, 26 in Europe, 25 in Australia, and *only* 11 in Japan. For comparison the PS3 has 12 titles at launch in the US and 6 in Japan. Every other region had way more because of the delayed lauch in other regions due to manufacturing shortages. Xbox 360 had 18 in North America, 16 in Europe, and 6 in Japan.

So please, complain more about the lack of launch titles.
 
2012-12-08 12:52:44 PM  
As a retail cashier, I have discovered that many parents don't mind their eight-year-olds playing Call of Duty and other similar, violent games.
 
2012-12-08 08:58:40 PM  

The Downfall: As a retail cashier, I have discovered that many parents don't mind their eight-year-olds playing Call of Duty and other similar, violent games.


I grew up with parents who gave me a waiver to rent R rated movies when I was old enough to go to the store and pick movies. My only rule was 'no horrors'. Meanwhile, my best friend's religious parents forbid him anything but PG and under until he was 18.

Studies have shown that violent videogames actually tend to reduce violent crime, though it can increase violent behavior for a limited time in very young kids. By 'violence' I mean stuff like 'Cowboys and Indians' play with firing of fake guns and shouts of 'bang! You're dead!'.
 
2012-12-08 11:42:20 PM  
Well, are they wrong? Is there any better method console makers could possibly implement?

Not that most M-rated games are mature in any meaningful way.
 
2012-12-09 12:54:02 AM  

The Downfall: As a retail cashier, I have discovered that many parents don't mind their eight-year-olds playing Call of Duty and other similar, violent games.


Where do you work? When I was at Toys R Us, I had to ask for ID to sell M-rated games. I was also obligated to inform a parent purchasing an M-rated game for a child that was clearly underage of the content of said game, so that the parent wouldn't complain when they saw the game in action. Dad would usually roll his eyes and tell me junior heard worse language at school. Moms/aunts tended to be members of the pearl-clutching brigade and would act as if I just saved the innocent babe's immortal soul by offering just a little information (Information that, had they really cared what their child was interested in, was readily available ON THE BACK OF THE BOX THEY WERE JUST HOLDING). Around the same time, most of the other retailers in my area tightened their restrictions on M-rated games as well. This was about a decade ago, though, so maybe things have changed.
 
2012-12-09 08:56:30 PM  

Millennium: Well, are they wrong? Is there any better method console makers could possibly implement?

Not that most M-rated games are mature in any meaningful way.


Optional passcode for ratings of selected maturity. You set it up in the options and unless you enter it it doesn't let you buy games above the set maturity level, nor allow access to games if they're set to require the code.

Blam, single adults aren't inconvenienced, nor are parents who don't care, and 'waking up in the middle of night to sneak down to make the purchase' doesn't work either to bypass parents who DO care. Also, said parents can restrict games they don't desire their children play irregardless of time zone or working schedule.
 
2012-12-10 06:40:33 PM  

razyjean: The Downfall: As a retail cashier, I have discovered that many parents don't mind their eight-year-olds playing Call of Duty and other similar, violent games.

Where do you work? When I was at Toys R Us, I had to ask for ID to sell M-rated games. I was also obligated to inform a parent purchasing an M-rated game for a child that was clearly underage of the content of said game, so that the parent wouldn't complain when they saw the game in action. Dad would usually roll his eyes and tell me junior heard worse language at school. Moms/aunts tended to be members of the pearl-clutching brigade and would act as if I just saved the innocent babe's immortal soul by offering just a little information (Information that, had they really cared what their child was interested in, was readily available ON THE BACK OF THE BOX THEY WERE JUST HOLDING). Around the same time, most of the other retailers in my area tightened their restrictions on M-rated games as well. This was about a decade ago, though, so maybe things have changed.


Walmart. We do card for rated M games and R rated movies, if you look under 17, but parents can buy whatever for their kids. Except booze/tobacco of course. I don't think we are supposed to discourage them from buying the game, and we certainly are not required to point out that it may be inappropriate. Sometimes you do get grannies asking questions, in which case I give an honest answer.
 
2012-12-10 11:41:36 PM  

The Downfall: Walmart. We do card for rated M games and R rated movies, if you look under 17, but parents can buy whatever for their kids. Except booze/tobacco of course. I don't think we are supposed to discourage them from buying the game, and we certainly are not required to point out that it may be inappropriate. Sometimes you do get grannies asking questions, in which case I give an honest answer.


Wow, good luck with the next few weeks. I know retail and xmas is tough!

We weren't supposed to "discourage" really, just make sure the parent knew what was in the game so they didn't call corporate and complain with something like "how could you sell a game you knew had violence/sex/whatever to my poor precious snowflake!?" all outrage-y. It's nice to know at least some parents are trying to be informed :)
 
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