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(Telegraph)   "Catcher in the Rye", and "To Kill a Mockingbird" to be replaced in US classrooms by texts such as "Recommended Levels of Insulation," "Invasive Plant Inventory," and "How to Turn Critical Thinkers in to Welfare Recipients"   (telegraph.co.uk) divider line 352
    More: Asinine, Catcher in the Rye, Harper Lee, classic book, J.D. Salinger, National Governors Association, curriculum, standards-based education reform, critical thinking  
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9347 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Dec 2012 at 5:43 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-07 09:07:06 PM

muck4doo: rhondajeremy: Looks like Brave New World more & more is becoming a reality...scary stuff.

Have your soma and be happy.


Do I have to be one of those filthy Epsilons?
 
2012-12-07 09:08:22 PM

muck4doo: James F. Campbell: Well, I don't have to work because I get paid to go to school. And I get paid to go to school because I'm good at what I do.

fark everyone else. You got yours.


I think getting paid to go to school at the management level is a crime funded by criminals.

When I arrest you, your arm may be broken, self-aggrandized jackhat, and I hope you learn from that experience, for if you don't learn there, I'll teach you here...

*)
 
2012-12-07 09:14:32 PM

djkutch: AssAsInAssassin: Is it any wonder that the monkey's confused?
He said "Mama, Mama, the presiden'ts a fool.
Why do I have to keep reading these technical manuals?"
And the joint chiefs of staff and the brokers on Wall Street said
"Don't make us laugh, you're a smart kid
Time is linear, memory's a stranger, history is for fools,
Man is a tool in the hands of the Great God Almighty."
And they gave him command
of a nuclear submarine
and sent him back
in search of the Garden of Eden.

/Roger Waters

He's a prophet.


Also, a profit: Link

/Saw The Wall in Chicago this year. Best. Concert. Ever.
 
2012-12-07 09:16:43 PM

Indubitably: Skirl Hutsenreiter: cptjeff: Skirl Hutsenreiter: Summercat: Can we get rid of Hemingway too? Old Man and the Sea was... Blesgh.

I don't know why anyone uses that piece of crap. Prejudiced me against Hemingway for years. After some more exposure, now I actually quite like Hemingway's short fiction. Still haven't found a novel of his that I'm really a fan of.

\I don't know why teachers seem surprised when modern children don't relate to postwar literature.

I loved Hemmingway as a teen. Still do, though I don't read much of him often these days, I've got so much other stuff piled up and waiting. Hemmingway isn't a crappy writer just because his style isn't to your taste, and the fact that you don't like him doesn't mean that everybody in your age group hates him.

I enjoyed The Old Man and the Sea the first time I read it, middle school IIRC, and still enjoy rereading it every couple of years today. And I can't say I can remember hearing many people in classes where it was read complain, at least any more than the standard, "I hate reading" group.

On the other hand, I loathe Dickens. I have a friend who loves everything he's ever written. I love Victor Hugo, my brother couldn't make it more than 50 pages into The Hunchback of Notre Dame. All three of those authors are literary greats, and should be broadly read. Will you like every writing style? No. Is it worth being exposed to them? Hell yes. And if you don't like Hemmingway's style, you should be thankful your teacher didn't assign you For Whom the Bell Tolls. The Old Man and the Sea is at least short, though the high school you might have enjoyed the sex in For Whom the Bell Tolls.

We had The Sun Also Rises in high school. It was another one that didn't particularly resonate with the class at an all girls school, but I didn't find it as simplistic and monotonous as The Old Man and the Sea.

Willa Cather was another one where the teacher's choice did not line up with the author's best work IMHO. We did My Antonia, and I got ti ...

I think you suck as a teacher at your school apparently?

Please.

Quit insulting our collective intelligence, please.

To engage


What?
 
2012-12-07 09:20:12 PM

Skirl Hutsenreiter: Indubitably: Skirl Hutsenreiter: cptjeff: Skirl Hutsenreiter: Summercat: Can we get rid of Hemingway too? Old Man and the Sea was... Blesgh.

I don't know why anyone uses that piece of crap. Prejudiced me against Hemingway for years. After some more exposure, now I actually quite like Hemingway's short fiction. Still haven't found a novel of his that I'm really a fan of.

\I don't know why teachers seem surprised when modern children don't relate to postwar literature.

I loved Hemmingway as a teen. Still do, though I don't read much of him often these days, I've got so much other stuff piled up and waiting. Hemmingway isn't a crappy writer just because his style isn't to your taste, and the fact that you don't like him doesn't mean that everybody in your age group hates him.

I enjoyed The Old Man and the Sea the first time I read it, middle school IIRC, and still enjoy rereading it every couple of years today. And I can't say I can remember hearing many people in classes where it was read complain, at least any more than the standard, "I hate reading" group.

On the other hand, I loathe Dickens. I have a friend who loves everything he's ever written. I love Victor Hugo, my brother couldn't make it more than 50 pages into The Hunchback of Notre Dame. All three of those authors are literary greats, and should be broadly read. Will you like every writing style? No. Is it worth being exposed to them? Hell yes. And if you don't like Hemmingway's style, you should be thankful your teacher didn't assign you For Whom the Bell Tolls. The Old Man and the Sea is at least short, though the high school you might have enjoyed the sex in For Whom the Bell Tolls.

We had The Sun Also Rises in high school. It was another one that didn't particularly resonate with the class at an all girls school, but I didn't find it as simplistic and monotonous as The Old Man and the Sea.

Willa Cather was another one where the teacher's choice did not line up with the author's best work IMHO ...

To teach

 
2012-12-07 09:21:06 PM

AssAsInAssassin: djkutch: AssAsInAssassin: Is it any wonder that the monkey's confused?
He said "Mama, Mama, the presiden'ts a fool.
Why do I have to keep reading these technical manuals?"
And the joint chiefs of staff and the brokers on Wall Street said
"Don't make us laugh, you're a smart kid
Time is linear, memory's a stranger, history is for fools,
Man is a tool in the hands of the Great God Almighty."
And they gave him command
of a nuclear submarine
and sent him back
in search of the Garden of Eden.

/Roger Waters

He's a prophet.

Also, a profit: Link

/Saw The Wall in Chicago this year. Best. Concert. Ever.


Agreed. Saw The Wall and Amused to Death/Dark Side of the Moon in PHX. Both epic.
 
2012-12-07 09:21:43 PM

IronMyno: Indubitably: Indubitably: Skirl Hutsenreiter: Summercat: Can we get rid of Hemingway too? Old Man and the Sea was... Blesgh.

I don't know why anyone uses that piece of crap. Prejudiced me against Hemingway for years. After some more exposure, now I actually quite like Hemingway's short fiction. Still haven't found a novel of his that I'm really a fan of.

\I don't know why teachers seem surprised when modern children don't relate to postwar literature.

Try his travel pieces and think.

"How can I make history come to light for my students? Is it the text? Or is it me? Or both?"

Whenever I hear about a book that didn't work in a class, I hear about a teacher more...

I dunno, I had an English Lit teacher that i would have sold my soul to have as a lover and even she couldn't make "Ethan Frome" tolerable.

// that was a terrible story.. well written but awfull none-the less


It is a terrible story, but I guess I've always been susceptible to terrible stories. That was one of my favorite books we read in school.
 
2012-12-07 09:23:29 PM

Etchy333: There was once this guy that wasted his time in calligraphy class in college. He wasn't even going to the school that was teaching the class, he just wanted to learn a dying art. Can you imagine that, calligraphy? Long story short, he was a miserable failure his whole life and never did anything worthwhile, except be one of the founders of Apple computers.


What's the parallel? People should be able to go someplace that's not their school to pursue personal interests? Sure, agree.
 
2012-12-07 09:27:20 PM
They can always read the Pokemon versions.

i255.photobucket.com

boourns.cjb.net

i.imgur.com

www.videogamedj.com

images.geeknative.com.s3.amazonaws.com
 
2012-12-07 09:27:21 PM

James F. Campbell: Ishidan: There's a reason your profile says "I get paid to go to school" instead of "I get paid to work", I suppose. However, most people won't and can't be like you. They need to be EMPLOYABLE.

What am I? I'm employed. You?

Well, I don't have to work because I get paid to go to school. And I get paid to go to school because I'm good at what I do. Listening to your sad sack story now, it's no surprise you look down your nose at me and at literature in general. You pretty much have to in order to feel like you're worth anything. You bitter, pathetic man.


Yeah...I used to love literature, actually. Used to be the bookworm, the reader, the one who could and did read and walk at the same time.
Fact of the matter is, you know what it is to be an ivory tower intellectual. I know what the job market wants out of line workers.
 
2012-12-07 09:28:43 PM

James F. Campbell: Ishidan: There's a reason your profile says "I get paid to go to school" instead of "I get paid to work", I suppose. However, most people won't and can't be like you. They need to be EMPLOYABLE.

What am I? I'm employed. You?

Well, I don't have to work because I get paid to go to school. And I get paid to go to school because I'm good at what I do. Listening to your sad sack story now, it's no surprise you look down your nose at me and at literature in general. You pretty much have to in order to feel like you're worth anything. You bitter, pathetic man.


Can you be more vague? I can't tell if you've got a grant or you get paid to mop the floors after-hours. Both are "getting paid to go to school," in the literal sense. So, is this a scholarship where they're paying to better their reputation, a grant where they're paying for your findings, some sort of secret-shopper-like program where they're paying you for critiques, the government in the hopes you'll be useful to the economy, or are you actually getting paid for clean floors?

Because I unequivocally guarantee you that no one is paying you to go to school for the sole purpose of you expanding your horizons.
 
2012-12-07 09:28:51 PM

djkutch: AssAsInAssassin: djkutch: AssAsInAssassin: Is it any wonder that the monkey's confused?
He said "Mama, Mama, the presiden'ts a fool.
Why do I have to keep reading these technical manuals?"
And the joint chiefs of staff and the brokers on Wall Street said
"Don't make us laugh, you're a smart kid
Time is linear, memory's a stranger, history is for fools,
Man is a tool in the hands of the Great God Almighty."
And they gave him command
of a nuclear submarine
and sent him back
in search of the Garden of Eden.

/Roger Waters

He's a prophet.

Also, a profit: Link

/Saw The Wall in Chicago this year. Best. Concert. Ever.

Agreed. Saw The Wall and Amused to Death/Dark Side of the Moon in PHX. Both epic.


Saw the DSOM tour in 2006, Radio KAOS in 1987, Floyd twice in '87.

There was never an Amused To Death tour. He only played selections from it.

/FWIW.
 
2012-12-07 09:30:04 PM

Keizer_Ghidorah: boourns.cjb.net


I tried reading the Oddishey. Kept putting me to sleep.
 
2012-12-07 09:35:16 PM
I graduated HS in the mid 90's and I was never required to read these books, matter of fact I don't remember any required reading in HS, but perhaps I missed those because I was taking AP Physics and Earth Science classes.
 
2012-12-07 09:35:53 PM

Ishidan: James F. Campbell: Ishidan: There's a reason your profile says "I get paid to go to school" instead of "I get paid to work", I suppose. However, most people won't and can't be like you. They need to be EMPLOYABLE.

What am I? I'm employed. You?

Well, I don't have to work because I get paid to go to school. And I get paid to go to school because I'm good at what I do. Listening to your sad sack story now, it's no surprise you look down your nose at me and at literature in general. You pretty much have to in order to feel like you're worth anything. You bitter, pathetic man.

Yeah...I used to love literature, actually. Used to be the bookworm, the reader, the one who could and did read and walk at the same time.
Fact of the matter is, you know what it is to be an ivory tower intellectual. I know what the job market wants out of line workers.


He's a special little snowflake. You should be happy to support him so you can hear more of his wisdom on Fark.
 
2012-12-07 09:36:59 PM

dennysgod: I graduated HS in the mid 90's and I was never required to read these books, matter of fact I don't remember any required reading in HS, but perhaps I missed those because I was taking AP Physics and Earth Science classes.


They didn't require you to take any English classes?
 
2012-12-07 09:37:58 PM

Ishidan: Yeah...I used to love literature, actually. Used to be the bookworm, the reader, the one who could and did read and walk at the same time.
Fact of the matter is, you know what it is to be an ivory tower intellectual. I know what the job market wants out of line workers.


Man who used to like X couldn't hack it doing X for a living, so he ended up in a dead-end job that he hates with every fiber of his being. Now he hates X and anyone associated with X and wants to see X destroyed. Your life is a bad novel. Funny.

Well, try not to kill any of your co-workers (unless they really deserve it) when your shiatty job eventually snaps your mind in half like a dry twig.
 
2012-12-07 09:38:48 PM
Indubitably

Wow, reading comprehension problems abound. You seem to think I teach English. Just so you know, the closest I've come is college Physics.
 
2012-12-07 09:39:35 PM

ProfessorOhki: Keizer_Ghidorah: boourns.cjb.net

I tried reading the Oddishey. Kept putting me to sleep.


At least it didn't use Stun Spore or Poison Powder.
 
2012-12-07 09:40:37 PM
I truly loved Catcher in the Rye. But that was 41 years ago. Since FARK is so widely criticizing Hemingway, I will accept criticism of CITR, but only if it was from someone who read CITR in high school. If you read it at college age, duh no wonder you hated it.

That said, the real stinkers are The Crucible and the Great Gatsby.

Also, To Kill a Mockingbird is the greatest and should be read.
 
2012-12-07 09:41:15 PM

James F. Campbell: Ishidan: Yeah...I used to love literature, actually. Used to be the bookworm, the reader, the one who could and did read and walk at the same time.
Fact of the matter is, you know what it is to be an ivory tower intellectual. I know what the job market wants out of line workers.

Man who used to like X couldn't hack it doing X for a living, so he ended up in a dead-end job that he hates with every fiber of his being. Now he hates X and anyone associated with X and wants to see X destroyed. Your life is a bad novel. Funny.

Well, try not to kill any of your co-workers (unless they really deserve it) when your shiatty job eventually snaps your mind in half like a dry twig.


See. This is the kind of wisdom spewed on Fark that is well worth your tax dollars.
 
2012-12-07 09:41:58 PM

AssAsInAssassin: djkutch: AssAsInAssassin: djkutch: AssAsInAssassin: Is it any wonder that the monkey's confused?
He said "Mama, Mama, the presiden'ts a fool.
Why do I have to keep reading these technical manuals?"
And the joint chiefs of staff and the brokers on Wall Street said
"Don't make us laugh, you're a smart kid
Time is linear, memory's a stranger, history is for fools,
Man is a tool in the hands of the Great God Almighty."
And they gave him command
of a nuclear submarine
and sent him back
in search of the Garden of Eden.

/Roger Waters

He's a prophet.

Also, a profit: Link

/Saw The Wall in Chicago this year. Best. Concert. Ever.

Agreed. Saw The Wall and Amused to Death/Dark Side of the Moon in PHX. Both epic.

Saw the DSOM tour in 2006, Radio KAOS in 1987, Floyd twice in '87.

There was never an Amused To Death tour. He only played selections from it.

/FWIW.


He a good chunk of it the first half of the show if I recall correctly. Drugs were involved.

He likes Phoenix and treats them right.
 
2012-12-07 09:42:53 PM
As I read this thread, I absentmindedly thought of "Brave New World", and I was pleased to see that it came up. Since it was on the junior high school reading list, you could say I was "forced" to read it, but I'm glad I did. It was one of those stories that really made an impression on me. I never cared much for "Catcher in the Rye", but I didn't hate it either. I loved "Flowers for Algernon", and for a time thought "A Clockwork Orange" was the best book ever written. While I sat in college prep courses, my best friend was in the tech program learning to weld, and sometimes we'd meet between classes in the hallway near the home ec classrooms, where they had ovens and made (sometimes) yummy smelling stuff.

My point is that I could have taken auto shop or drafting or literature appreciation or how to manage a household. (Because I'm dated, this was WAY before the internet). If I remember correctly, by the time we got to jr high, the (good) teachers were very good at steering students toward curricula that best suited their aptitude.

/there will always be alphas and gammas
//unlike the story, we don't need to create them; they're already here
///that conclusion can be arrived at either empirically or philosophically
 
2012-12-07 09:43:17 PM

Kevin72: I truly loved Catcher in the Rye. But that was 41 years ago. Since FARK is so widely criticizing Hemingway, I will accept criticism of CITR, but only if it was from someone who read CITR in high school. If you read it at college age, duh no wonder you hated it.

That said, the real stinkers are The Crucible and the Great Gatsby.

Also, To Kill a Mockingbird is the greatest and should be read.


I'd suggest The Tin Drum, but that might cause people in other circles to get their panties in a bunch.
 
2012-12-07 09:43:44 PM

Lionel Mandrake: FlyingLizardOfDoom: Catcher in the Rye was a stupid book.

Grand_Moff_Joseph: Catcher in the Rye was a horrendously stupid book

Matthew 7:6


images.t-nation.com
 
2012-12-07 09:43:54 PM

Skirl Hutsenreiter: willyfreddy: I have less of a problem with this point, in relation to Shakespeare specifically (let the Drama kids read him). However, Catcher in the Rye and To Kill A Mockingbird are NOT Shakespeare. And I would NOT agree that replacing them with Invasive Plant Inventory is a good idea.

Except Shakespeare still features prominently, and no one who writes these guidelines is suggesting replacing To Kill a Mockingbird (still explicitly recommended in grades 9-10 English classrooms) with the Invasive Plant Inventory (recommended for grades 6-8 SCIENCE classrooms).


Oh. Well, if that's true then two things should happen: 1) You should email them to correct their article. 2) I should calm down.
 
2012-12-07 09:44:56 PM

James F. Campbell: Well, I don't have to work.


also, when you say you "don't have to work", regardless of further context, you just proved that you have absolutely no clue what you are talking about, as you have no experience in the field under discussion.

You have never had to supervise employees that got in trouble because they "thought" something which turned into a disaster because they hackjobbed a solution that had a better solution that would have been clear with more technical training.

You have never had to deal in the majority of the nonprofessional work that exists in the real world, which is repetitive and rule-based. Your "education" teaches you how to "think", but not how to DO.

You have, quite frankly, never worked. Other than political science, I am still stumped as to what exactly it is you do-and as I said before, they can't all be political commentators.
 
2012-12-07 09:45:52 PM

Jixa: My eldest is in 9th grade this year and his reading list for English class is pathetic. "The Hunger Games" is the required reading for his first semester. The farking Hunger Games!? The rest of the list is pretty pathetic. They're going to read excerpts, excerpts of Homer's Odyssey! No Grapes of Wrath, no Catcher in the Rye, no To Kill a Mockingbird, no Steinbeck, no Edgar Allen Poe, no Dickens. They are, at least reading "Romeo and Juliet". I guess it's still a staple of 9th grade English. I foresee a future of uneducated, illiterate boobs.

/I feel old now
//my lawn, etc.


First off as a series I'll say that the hunger games was a great set of books and there are a lot of things in there that you can teach to. Just because it's new and popular doesn't, on its own, make it bad. And if it bothers you so much that your kids aren't reading To Kill a Mockingbird well then as a parent why don't you read it with them.
Isn't that what Aticus did with Scout?
 
2012-12-07 09:47:21 PM

Ishidan: James F. Campbell: Well, I don't have to work.

also, when you say you "don't have to work", regardless of further context, you just proved that you have absolutely no clue what you are talking about, as you have no experience in the field under discussion.

You have never had to supervise employees that got in trouble because they "thought" something which turned into a disaster because they hackjobbed a solution that had a better solution that would have been clear with more technical training.

You have never had to deal in the majority of the nonprofessional work that exists in the real world, which is repetitive and rule-based. Your "education" teaches you how to "think", but not how to DO.

You have, quite frankly, never worked. Other than political science, I am still stumped as to what exactly it is you do-and as I said before, they can't all be political commentators.


I think he is a paid lab monkey.
 
2012-12-07 09:48:00 PM

jj325: FlyingLizardOfDoom: Catcher in the Rye was a stupid book.

Agreed. Should be replaced by this

[upload.wikimedia.org image 200x340]

Most popular book in my high school


chanarchive.org
 
2012-12-07 09:49:22 PM
Putting kids to sleep , your doing it right.
 
2012-12-07 09:51:26 PM
If you think children's education is solely the responsibility of the public school system you should not have or raise children.
 
2012-12-07 09:51:27 PM
A few more Pokemon literary classics.

chanarchive.org

chanarchive.org

chanarchive.org

chanarchive.org

chanarchive.org
 
2012-12-07 09:52:06 PM
Well, it seems I've triggered a real dogpiling on James F. Campbell.
Fun as it is, I think I'll go get dinner now.

I'll be sure to ask the employed people that I meet while doing so--like the cook, the waiter, the bartender, and the guy driving the reefer truck bringing in the supplies--how they got their jobs.

I'll bet not a single one will say "They were impressed by my knowledge of classical American literature".
 
2012-12-07 09:52:07 PM
Yes, let's stop teaching children that narrators cannot always be trusted and that institutional racism can make otherwise decent people do horrible things, and stick to teaching them how to create spreadsheets and put up drywall. What could possibly go wrong?

Forget aesthetics and higher culture and all that. Even from a strictly utilitarian perspective, this is a really bad idea.
 
2012-12-07 09:55:38 PM

Ishidan: Well, it seems I've triggered a real dogpiling on James F. Campbell.
Fun as it is, I think I'll go get dinner now.

I'll be sure to ask the employed people that I meet while doing so--like the cook, the waiter, the bartender, and the guy driving the reefer truck bringing in the supplies--how they got their jobs.

I'll bet not a single one will say "They were impressed by my knowledge of classical American literature".


Odd that you think knowledge's purpose is to impress others. Says a lot about you.
 
2012-12-07 09:59:50 PM

Keizer_Ghidorah: A few more Pokemon literary classics.

[chanarchive.org image 281x475]

[chanarchive.org image 510x680]

[chanarchive.org image 322x475]

[chanarchive.org image 484x624]

[chanarchive.org image 339x475]


I feel terrible. I know I shouldn't find them funny, but I can't stop chuckling. The Great Ghastly... heh. Then again, there already is a Great Ghastly on Fark.
 
2012-12-07 10:00:52 PM

James F. Campbell:
Man who used to like X fiction couldn't hack it doing X being in a fictional world for a living, so he ended up in a dead-end ordinary physical job that he hates with every fiber of his being is having difficulties with, having been surrounded by an education overfilled with fiction. Now he hates X and anyone associated with X and wants to see X destroyed has learned a bitter lesson, and wants to prevent others from wasting their time the way he did. Your life is a bad novel. Funny.

Well, try not to kill any of your co-workers (unless they really deserve it) when your shiatty job eventually snaps your mind in half like a dry twig.

 

Left the last part unstruck because really, that's already happened. So now I'm "normal".
 
2012-12-07 10:01:11 PM

Skirl Hutsenreiter: Indubitably

Wow, reading comprehension problems abound. You seem to think I teach English. Just so you know, the closest I've come is college Physics.


NSS?
 
2012-12-07 10:01:34 PM

Ishidan: Well, it seems I've triggered a real dogpiling on James F. Campbell.
Fun as it is, I think I'll go get dinner now.

I'll be sure to ask the employed people that I meet while doing so--like the cook, the waiter, the bartender, and the guy driving the reefer truck bringing in the supplies--how they got their jobs.

I'll bet not a single one will say "They were impressed by my knowledge of classical American literature".


Not taking that bet. There's some weird bars out there:
web-images.chacha.com

/hot
 
2012-12-07 10:01:39 PM

Skirl Hutsenreiter: I don't know why anyone uses that piece of crap. Prejudiced me against Hemingway for years. After some more exposure, now I actually quite like Hemingway's short fiction. Still haven't found a novel of his that I'm really a fan of.

\I don't know why teachers seem surprised when modern children don't relate to postwar literature.


High school English teacher here,

For the most part, teachers aren't surprised by this. Those who are surprised are the types who actually wish to teach college, but don't want to do another five or six years of school. Personally, I'd like to see much more contemporary literature introduced into the curriculum, but school systems do not want to stray away from what has been "proven" to work. It's difficult for me to explain to my kids why they should have to read Romeo and Juliet, the story of a horny 17 year old who kills himself after he thinks his four-day, 13 year-old slam piece has killed herself. To me, telling kids that a four day romance ending in suicide is the greatest love story in literature sends a very confusing message.

There is value in teaching literature with difficult vocabulary and syntax, but I think we could find a better, more relevant way to do it.


Oh, and check out The Sun Also Rises. It's the best love story ever written about a man who's dick was blown off during battle. I think people miss that part.
 
2012-12-07 10:02:07 PM

Ishidan: Well, it seems I've triggered a real dogpiling on James F. Campbell.
Fun as it is, I think I'll go get dinner now.

I'll be sure to ask the employed people that I meet while doing so--like the cook, the waiter, the bartender, and the guy driving the reefer truck bringing in the supplies--how they got their jobs.

I'll bet not a single one will say "They were impressed by my knowledge of classical American literature".


Yeah, it's not like you can learn anything from it, right?

Dipshiat.
 
2012-12-07 10:05:10 PM

James F. Campbell: Odd that you think knowledge's purpose is to impress others. Says a lot about you.


Ah so, and what is its purpose, then? The grand expansion of the self?
 
2012-12-07 10:07:36 PM

Ishidan: James F. Campbell: Odd that you think knowledge's purpose is to impress others. Says a lot about you.

Ah so, and what is its purpose, then? The grand expansion of the self?


He's one of those people who gets paid to take experimental drugs, and things like that. He's good at taking drugs.
 
2012-12-07 10:07:46 PM
And in celebration of Peter Jackson's "the Hobbit":

chanarchive.org

chanarchive.org

chanarchive.org

chanarchive.org
 
2012-12-07 10:07:55 PM
To bar
 
2012-12-07 10:09:36 PM

dontbreakthebend: It's difficult for me to explain to my kids why they should have to read Romeo and Juliet, the story of a horny 17 year old who kills himself after he thinks his four-day, 13 year-old slam piece has killed herself. To me, telling kids that a four day romance ending in suicide is the greatest love story in literature sends a very confusing message.


HAHAHAHA
How about Chaucer?
Yo, the Miller's Tale is HILARIOUS!
 
2012-12-07 10:14:20 PM

Ishidan: dontbreakthebend: It's difficult for me to explain to my kids why they should have to read Romeo and Juliet, the story of a horny 17 year old who kills himself after he thinks his four-day, 13 year-old slam piece has killed herself. To me, telling kids that a four day romance ending in suicide is the greatest love story in literature sends a very confusing message.

HAHAHAHA
How about Chaucer?
Yo, the Miller's Tale is HILARIOUS!


I don't think even farts will motivate kids to get through Chaucer
 
2012-12-07 10:22:08 PM

ProfessorOhki: Ishidan: Well, it seems I've triggered a real dogpiling on James F. Campbell.
Fun as it is, I think I'll go get dinner now.

I'll be sure to ask the employed people that I meet while doing so--like the cook, the waiter, the bartender, and the guy driving the reefer truck bringing in the supplies--how they got their jobs.

I'll bet not a single one will say "They were impressed by my knowledge of classical American literature".

Not taking that bet. There's some weird bars out there:
[web-images.chacha.com image 600x400]

/hot


I MUST KNOW WHERE THIS IS.
 
2012-12-07 10:25:04 PM
Not a literary piece, but I found it hilarious.

resource.mmgn.com
 
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