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(Telegraph)   "Catcher in the Rye", and "To Kill a Mockingbird" to be replaced in US classrooms by texts such as "Recommended Levels of Insulation," "Invasive Plant Inventory," and "How to Turn Critical Thinkers in to Welfare Recipients"   (telegraph.co.uk) divider line 352
    More: Asinine, Catcher in the Rye, Harper Lee, classic book, J.D. Salinger, National Governors Association, curriculum, standards-based education reform, critical thinking  
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9345 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Dec 2012 at 5:43 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-07 06:32:03 PM
American Schools: preparing your children for the best jobs of 1974 since 1980.
 
2012-12-07 06:33:31 PM

BronyMedic: Indubitably: Did you see my previous post about overreacting?

You should.

Aren't you assuming that I'm "ovrreacting", and not further trolling people who seem to think a single grammatical error matters in a non-academic conversation on the internet?

Tisk tisk. Didn't your mother teach you what happens when you assume?


Yeah, and she also taught me how to spell "tsk" too.

*)
 
2012-12-07 06:33:45 PM

Ishidan: You can spend more time teaching practical physics (insulation and building codes) and natural biology (plant inventories) or you can spend your time reading FICTION.

I'm part of the generation that read both. I'll be damned if I could tell you, ten years later, what good it did me: when writing corporate reports, flowery vocabulary was not an asset, writing like a machine was.


It helps to develop the part of your brain that deals with creativity, which in turn helps you in problem solving and critical thinking. Only reading instruction manual type writing won't develop that part of brain.
 
2012-12-07 06:33:54 PM
I don't have a problem with this. People should read fiction on their own for their own enjoyment. That is what it is intended for anyway.

Also, Catcher In The Rye is a stupid book. I can't believe anyone likes that drivel at all. I am not trolling, I genuinely don't see how you can like that worthless crap.

To Kill a Mockingbird on the other hand is pure genius. Loved the movie too.
 
2012-12-07 06:34:49 PM

dj_bigbird: Wow, subby wasn't being satirical in the headline.


Sadly, I was surprised too.
I would have preferred brilliant satire to the truth.

Good job subby in showing restraint!
 
2012-12-07 06:36:04 PM
They should move university level Critical Thinking to the High school level, but make it a 4 year requirement like Math. You should not be able to graduate high school without having memorized all the logical fallacies and a basic understanding of statistics and budgeting for consumers.
 
2012-12-07 06:36:30 PM
"In the end, education has to be about more than simply ensuring that kids can get a job. Isn't it supposed to be about making well-rounded citizens?"

I'm pretty sure you can be a homeless and hungry well rounded citizen.
 
2012-12-07 06:37:31 PM

Skirl Hutsenreiter: This was a horrible breakdown of this issue.

The real problem is apparently administrators' reading comprehension. The Core Curriculum's reading recommendations for informational texts is meant to apply when looking at the whole curriculum, not just English classrooms. In other words, you're supposed to be reading some essays and biographies and such in classes like Geography, Civics, History, and even Math and the Sciences. And yeah, a little in English, but it's only myopic administrators who think that reading only happens in one classroom that are saying they'll have to drastically cut fiction to meet the nonfiction standards.


I had a feeling it had to be something like this, and I'm not at all surprised the Telegraph got it wrong.
 
2012-12-07 06:37:51 PM

Grand_Moff_Joseph: dickfreckle: Spitting out a kid who can only write as though it were a technical manual is not the way to fix things.

Um, what do you think the education systems of half the world have been doing for the last 20 years? Those folks may not even know who Shakespeare is, but they did a dang good job gutting our manufacturing and technology industries. 

Perhaps we need to fight back in the same manner to catch up. Then again, either way, Catcher in the Rye was a horrendously stupid book, so it's of no loss to the classroom, imo.

/puts on flame retardant suit


This, this whole thing, this.
 
2012-12-07 06:38:49 PM
You think teens are rebellious little farks now. Wait until they figure out that schools are trying to mold them into complacent little worker drones.

See, this is what I hate about government departments these days. Why does it have to be either/or? Liberal arts, or trade school stuff? Why can't kids be taught both?
 
2012-12-07 06:39:54 PM
Also, Subby, your added title to the list of required reading. Kindly get a clue. I've yet to see an employer that cared whether I've read "the classics". I've yet to see a welfare recipient that would benefit by being more "cultured". Indeed, to get out of welfare, most recipients I've seen would benefit by a precisely targeted education, concentrating only on job-related knowledge and skills. I can see a contractor wanting workers to know about insulation types, or a rancher wanting the fieldhands to know about invasive species, for example...but how does being able to quote classical works of fiction benefit the working class?

More math. More physics. More technical writing. More encyclopedic knowledge. Less fiction. That's how you prepare students that are fit for that band between "College educated professional" and "dumb grunt laborer". There's time enough for advanced writing and other such aristocratic skills in college.
 
2012-12-07 06:40:02 PM
Fiction and entertainment literature should be placed in a separate but equal library facility from strictly informational books. These groups of students have naturally varying interests, and quite simply can't handle interaction with the more confident, level headed achievers who go to church and play His blessed game of Football.
 
2012-12-07 06:40:47 PM
I think we need to completely change the education system in this nation. I say grades k-6 is reading, writing, math, social studies and science. Standards are assigned to each grade and each student must hit those standards. If a kid can not read, write and do math at their grade level, it's summer school. Fail that, repeat. Now, if it's only one of those three, like say Math, then required math summer school and advancement to the next grade with a required math remedial.

In Jr. High, we give assessment tests. Based on those tests we find out where the talents of the students lay and put them on a path that best harvests their talents. Those who's talents focus in the areas of medicine, law or engineering are put on a college path. Those with talents for acting or singing are put into programs to cultivate those skills. Mechanically inclined people who enjoy working with their hands can be allowed to choose a wide variety of paths from engineering to becoming an auto mechanic. Those with talents for becoming liberal arts can be shown how to make coffee and work the Starbucks drive thru and bureaucrats and HR people can be taken out and shot.

In the later teen years, those not in college bound paths, like the doctors and engineers, can go into apprenticeships to become better at their trades so when they reach the age of 18 they now have a marketable skill and can be more employable than high school grads are today who spend four years in high school and lack the skills to get employed at McDonald's. Now, I'm not saying that teenagers should drop completely out of high school and go instantly into the work force. A modified schedule of half work days and half school is a better solution. Or probably first year of high school mostly school and a few hours a week of work and each year less school and more work. I know some will read this and instantly hate it, but honestly, learning a job skill in high school that you can use afterwards to bring in an income is going to do students a thousand times better than expecting them to read three books by Charles Dickens over four years and treating every student like they're on the path to college when really, they all aren't and quite frankly, shouldn't be.

And as for college, I went, I graduated, and to be honest, the people that I've met who make the most money aren't really the college grads, they're the ones who went into sales and/or became business owners. Teachers in high school told me if I wanted to be a success I needed to go to college. I see college grads who spent four or more years in college to get a job paying less than $50k a year and are deep in debt with student loans, and I know others who never went to college, work eight weeks a year and bring in $150k/year. I'm learning from the people who only work eight weeks a year and make $150/year.
 
2012-12-07 06:41:32 PM

Skirl Hutsenreiter: Summercat: Can we get rid of Hemingway too? Old Man and the Sea was... Blesgh.

I don't know why anyone uses that piece of crap. Prejudiced me against Hemingway for years. After some more exposure, now I actually quite like Hemingway's short fiction. Still haven't found a novel of his that I'm really a fan of.

\I don't know why teachers seem surprised when modern children don't relate to postwar literature.


Hemingway wrote novels like he talked. Well, he was a raging cokehead who drank like a fish, so you can understand why they get so rambling and annoying in a hurry.

/When I want that, I go party with the art crowd in town.
 
2012-12-07 06:41:39 PM
Nothing fosters a love of great literature like being forced to read Romeo and Juliet out loud in 8th grade English class (except maybe getting your head caught in a lawnmower).
 
2012-12-07 06:45:35 PM

Ishidan: I'm part of the generation that read both. I'll be damned if I could tell you, ten years later, what good it did me: when writing corporate reports, flowery vocabulary was not an asset, writing like a machine was.


Reasoning and empathy are both "assets" fostered by literature, and both have served me well not just as a writer, but as a general construction labourer. I get promoted on job sites because of emotional intelligence, learned in part from from examples in literature. I also score the occasional story/screenplay sale, thanks to literature.

I'm certain the same applies to you, as I am certain that you are more than just a corporate report writer.
 
2012-12-07 06:45:41 PM

FlyingLizardOfDoom: Catcher in the Rye was a stupid book.

 
2012-12-07 06:46:08 PM

Skirl Hutsenreiter: Summercat: Can we get rid of Hemingway too? Old Man and the Sea was... Blesgh.

I don't know why anyone uses that piece of crap. Prejudiced me against Hemingway for years. After some more exposure, now I actually quite like Hemingway's short fiction. Still haven't found a novel of his that I'm really a fan of.

\I don't know why teachers seem surprised when modern children don't relate to postwar literature.


I loved Hemmingway as a teen. Still do, though I don't read much of him often these days, I've got so much other stuff piled up and waiting. Hemmingway isn't a crappy writer just because his style isn't to your taste, and the fact that you don't like him doesn't mean that everybody in your age group hates him.

I enjoyed The Old Man and the Sea the first time I read it, middle school IIRC, and still enjoy rereading it every couple of years today. And I can't say I can remember hearing many people in classes where it was read complain, at least any more than the standard, "I hate reading" group.

On the other hand, I loathe Dickens. I have a friend who loves everything he's ever written. I love Victor Hugo, my brother couldn't make it more than 50 pages into The Hunchback of Notre Dame. All three of those authors are literary greats, and should be broadly read. Will you like every writing style? No. Is it worth being exposed to them? Hell yes. And if you don't like Hemmingway's style, you should be thankful your teacher didn't assign you For Whom the Bell Tolls. The Old Man and the Sea is at least short, though the high school you might have enjoyed the sex in For Whom the Bell Tolls.
 
2012-12-07 06:46:12 PM
I think that more high schools should offer academic classes AND vocational classes at the same time.

I credit my high school, where I took both honors and AP courses along with a vocational major of IT with getting me to where I'm at today.
 
2012-12-07 06:47:18 PM

Old enough to know better: You think teens are rebellious little farks now. Wait until they figure out that schools are trying to mold them into complacent little worker drones.

See, this is what I hate about government departments these days. Why does it have to be either/or? Liberal arts, or trade school stuff? Why can't kids be taught both?


Only so many hours in the day, man. Do either one all day and create either little artists or little laborers, or split your time and create people who are perfectly useless because they can only half-think or half-work.
 
2012-12-07 06:47:34 PM

Klippoklondike: Somacandra: Dogberry: naughtyrev: Please tell me this is satire. They think this will help make kids prepared for college?

Not satire. See US Dept of Education's "Race to the Top."

I went to DOE's RTTT website and searched for "Recommended Insulation Levels." Nothing relevant. Searched for "Invasive Plant Inventory." A hit on learning about ecological concepts in 5th grade which is entirely reasonable. If you have some more evidence, please share. This is on Drudge Report too so I'm halfway assuming its Bullshiat to begin with.

There are articles by the Washington Post and the NY Times about it as well. So, looks real to me.

Link


Except the words "insulation" and "plant" don't appear anywhere in the article.

Did you know the word "gullible" isn't in the dictionary?
 
2012-12-07 06:47:35 PM

redmid17: dickfreckle: Grand_Moff_Joseph: Then again, either way, Catcher in the Rye was a horrendously stupid book, so it's of no loss to the classroom, imo.

/puts on flame retardant suit

You won't need that suit around me. I despise that book. It's not the worst thing I've ever read, but it's clearly the one with the most unearned importance attached to it. On the Road is in that league as well.

The only other book I've disliked as much as Catcher in the Rye was Girl of the Limberlost, which few outside of a 4th grade class in Indiana have read. Grapes of Wrath was pretty close though.



I enjoyed Grapes of Wrath a lot more when I read every other chapter. Perhaps the chapters describing the countryside were useful to people of that era. I have seen plenty of movies set in the American west and I know what it looks like, thank you very much.
 
2012-12-07 06:47:51 PM
trippdogg: Nothing fosters a love of great literature like being forced to read Romeo and Juliet out loud in 8th grade English class (except maybe getting your head caught in a lawnmower).

As far as Shakespere goes MacBeth, Julius Caesar, and Henry VI are far more entertaining than Romeo and Juliet
 
2012-12-07 06:47:57 PM

trippdogg: Nothing fosters a love of great literature like being forced to read Romeo and Juliet out loud in 8th grade English class (except maybe getting your head caught in a lawnmower).


The point of that was to make you learn how to speak coherently to groups, not love the book. Reading and reciting are different skills.
 
2012-12-07 06:48:19 PM
Good. The only only people who get anything out of those books are future art students who end up doing pretty much nothing with their lives anyway. Glad to see kids will be at least learning something useful soon.
 
2012-12-07 06:49:12 PM

Indubitably: BronyMedic: Indubitably: Did you see my previous post about overreacting?

You should.

Aren't you assuming that I'm "ovrreacting", and not further trolling people who seem to think a single grammatical error matters in a non-academic conversation on the internet?

Tisk tisk. Didn't your mother teach you what happens when you assume?

Yeah, and she also taught me how to spell "tsk" too.

*)


You "spell" tsk?
 
2012-12-07 06:50:31 PM

Ishidan: but how does being able to quote classical works of fiction benefit the working class?


The quoting part isn't the point... it's the understanding p[art that's important. Classics are the canon of culture, and they will help the working class understand who they are, what they contribute, and how they ought to be treated. Remove that influence, and you've got IngSoc.
 
2012-12-07 06:51:18 PM

beakerxf: redmid17: dickfreckle: Grand_Moff_Joseph: Then again, either way, Catcher in the Rye was a horrendously stupid book, so it's of no loss to the classroom, imo.

/puts on flame retardant suit

You won't need that suit around me. I despise that book. It's not the worst thing I've ever read, but it's clearly the one with the most unearned importance attached to it. On the Road is in that league as well.

The only other book I've disliked as much as Catcher in the Rye was Girl of the Limberlost, which few outside of a 4th grade class in Indiana have read. Grapes of Wrath was pretty close though.


I enjoyed Grapes of Wrath a lot more when I read every other chapter. Perhaps the chapters describing the countryside were useful to people of that era. I have seen plenty of movies set in the American west and I know what it looks like, thank you very much.


When you're paid by the word, you tend to load your novels with chapters of descriptions.
 
2012-12-07 06:51:42 PM
dickfreckle: Bullsh*t. It's not the knowledge of Shakespeare that makes the kid employable or ready for college. It's his or her exposure, however cursory, to a wide range of subjects. Spitting out a kid who can only write as though it were a technical manual is not the way to fix things.

The ability to write a tech manual is not the way to fix things?

A cursory exposure to a wide range of subjects might help you play Trivial Pursuit.
 
2012-12-07 06:51:48 PM

I should be in the kitchen: This makes me so sad. There is so much more to language than cut-and-dry informational texts and rote grammar lessons. A "knowledge of Shakespeare" may not apply directly to the workplace but creative thinking skills do. Also, literature is a wonderful way to connect with our culture and history. All this talk over the past couple decades of getting "back to basics" in education ignores the fact that historically, being well-rounded in the arts WAS considered a basic education.


Don't be sad.

The informational texts are in addition too existing texts.

This article is pure 100% bullshiat regarding voluntary participation in a private group's idea (that does have many states opting in) of what makes a core education, and it had lots of good books as well as these informational texts. This is the full list of exemplars, and you'll see To Kill A Mocking Bird is listed on Page 10 for the 9-10th graders

From the list someone else linked the list for grades 6-8 Link. It's a good list.

Grade 6-8 Suggested Reading Material Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy in
History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects

Stories
Alcott, Louisa May. Little Women
Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
L'Engle, Madeleine. A Wrinkle in Time
Cooper, Susan. The Dark Is Rising
Yep, Laurence. Dragonwings
Taylor, Mildred D. Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry
Hamilton, Virginia. "The People Could Fly."
Paterson, Katherine. The Tale of the Mandarin Ducks
Cisneros, Sandra. "Eleven."
Sutcliff, Rosemary. Black Ships Before Troy: The Story of the Iliad

Drama
Fletcher, Louise. Sorry, Wrong Number
Goodrich, Frances and Albert Hackett. The Diary of Anne Frank: A Play

Poetry
Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth. "Paul Revere's Ride."
Whitman, Walt. "O Captain! My Captain!"
Carroll, Lewis. "Jabberwocky."
Navajo tradition. "Twelfth Song of Thunder."
Dickinson, Emily. "The Railway Train."
Yeats, William Butler. "The Song of Wandering Aengus."
Frost, Robert. "The Road Not Taken."
Sandburg, Carl. "Chicago."
Hughes, Langston. "I, Too, Sing America."
Neruda, Pablo. "The Book of Questions."
Soto, Gary. "Oranges."
Giovanni, Nikki. "A Poem for My Librarian, Mrs. Long."

Informational Texts: English Language Arts
Adams, John. "Letter on Thomas Jefferson."
Douglass, Frederick. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass an American Slave, Written by Himself
Churchill, Winston. "Blood, Toil, Tears and Sweat: Address to Parliament on May 13th, 1940."
Petry, Ann. Harriet Tubman: Conductor on the Underground Railroad
Steinbeck, John. Travels with Charley: In Search of America

Informational Texts: History/Social Studies

United States. Preamble and First Amendment to the United States Constitution. (1787, 1791)
Lord, Walter. A Night to Remember
Isaacson, Phillip. A Short Walk through the Pyramids and through the World of Art
Murphy, Jim. The Great Fire
Greenberg, Jan, and Sandra Jordan. Vincent Van Gogh: Portrait of an Artist
Partridge, Elizabeth. This Land Was Made for You and Me: The Life and Songs of Woody Guthrie
Monk, Linda R. Words We Live By: Your Annotated Guide to the Constitution
Freedman, Russell. Freedom Walkers: The Story of the Montgomery Bus Boycott

Informational Texts: Science, Mathematics, and Technical Subjects
Macaulay, David. Cathedral: The Story of Its Construction
Mackay, Donald. The Building of Manhattan
Enzensberger, Hans Magnus. The Number Devil: A Mathematical Adventure
Peterson, Ivars and Nancy Henderson. Math Trek: Adventures in the Math Zone
Katz, John. Geeks: How Two Lost Boys Rode the Internet out of Idaho
Petroski, Henry. "The Evolution of the Grocery Bag."
"Geology." U*X*L Encyclopedia of Science
"Space Probe." Astronomy & Space: From the Big Bang to the Big Crunch
"Elementary Particles." New Book of Popular Science
California Invasive Plant Council. Invasive Plant Inventory
 
2012-12-07 06:52:39 PM

funmonger: Reasoning and empathy are both "assets" fostered by literature, and both have served me well not just as a writer, but as a general construction labourer. I get promoted on job sites because of emotional intelligence, learned in part from from examples in literature. I also score the occasional story/screenplay sale, thanks to literature.

I'm certain the same applies to you, as I am certain that you are more than just a corporate report writer.


I dunno, maybe I'm just surrounded by idiots. Wait, let me look. *sticks head out window, realizes he's in Hawaii". Oh wait that's it. Never mind me, I'm in a place where stupidity is prized...
 
2012-12-07 06:53:02 PM
Is it any wonder that the monkey's confused?
He said "Mama, Mama, the presiden'ts a fool.
Why do I have to keep reading these technical manuals?"
And the joint chiefs of staff and the brokers on Wall Street said
"Don't make us laugh, you're a smart kid
Time is linear, memory's a stranger, history is for fools,
Man is a tool in the hands of the Great God Almighty."
And they gave him command
of a nuclear submarine
and sent him back
in search of the Garden of Eden.

/Roger Waters
 
2012-12-07 06:53:47 PM
20 years from now, the curriculum will look like this..


Lesson 1
The answer to question number 1 is A

Lesson 2
The answer to question number 2 is C

Lesson 3
The answer to question number 3 is D

etc, etc, etc,....
 
2012-12-07 06:54:06 PM

Ishidan: Only so many hours in the day, man. Do either one all day and create either little artists or little laborers, or split your time and create people who are perfectly useless because they can only half-think or half-work.


False Dichotomy.
 
2012-12-07 06:54:07 PM

astelmaszek: I don't see a problem with this. Most people are actually fairly dumb. There is no reason for them to read anything but technical manuals and for that matter to write anything. It just makes for painful reading, that's all. We should separate kids young and early around 8th grade and basically have a 3 tier system: 3 year trade school, 5 year technical school and 4 year college prep school. That's how it was when I grew up in Europe and worked really well. 80% percent of the population has the following goals in life: work 8 hours a day for a decent wage, eat, fark, raise another generation of low IQ children.


Let's just do five tiers and call them alpha, beta, gamma, delta and episilon. That way we can just cut directly over to Fordism.
 
2012-12-07 06:55:00 PM

Nick Nostril: "In the end, education has to be about more than simply ensuring that kids can get a job. Isn't it supposed to be about making well-rounded citizens?"

I'm pretty sure you can be a homeless and hungry well rounded citizen.


You can definitely be educated, homeless, hungry, well-rounded, and a citizen.

*sniff-sniff*

Do you want me to explicate what I smell?
 
2012-12-07 06:55:32 PM
What's next? No homework? Oh shiat, wait
 
2012-12-07 06:55:55 PM
"How to Turn Critical Thinkers in to Welfare Recipients"

Why would one want to turn in Critical Thinkers? And why would it be to Welfare Recipients?
 
HBK
2012-12-07 06:56:09 PM
I'm glad they're doing away with Catcher in the Rye. That book was terrible. But keep The Great Gatsby and To Kill a Mockingbird.

/We read the Lord of the Rings trilogy in English Lit, our teacher was awesome.
 
2012-12-07 06:56:12 PM

bugmn99: Good. The only only people who get anything out of those books are future art students who end up doing pretty much nothing with their lives anyway. Glad to see kids will be at least learning something useful soon.


Yeah no.
 
2012-12-07 06:56:54 PM

doyner: FTFA: "A new school curriculum which will affect 46 out of 50 states will make it compulsory for at least 70 per cent of books studied to be non-fiction, in an effort to ready pupils for the workplace. "
And here is precicely the underlying problem in the US. We have changed our education system into a worker-bee development system.

ed·u·ca·tion/ˌɛdʒʊˈkeɪʃən/ Show Spelled [ej-oo-key-shuhn] noun
1. the act or process of imparting or acquiring general knowledge, developing the powers of reasoning and judgment, and generally of preparing oneself or others intellectually for mature life.

Education has nothing to do with being able to start working at Home Depot or Microsoft. Call me whackadoodle, but this is an indicator of our march from citizens to serfs.


Apparently your schooling was light on history.
 
2012-12-07 06:57:16 PM

Gyrfalcon: Indubitably: BronyMedic: Indubitably: Did you see my previous post about overreacting?

You should.

Aren't you assuming that I'm "ovrreacting", and not further trolling people who seem to think a single grammatical error matters in a non-academic conversation on the internet?

Tisk tisk. Didn't your mother teach you what happens when you assume?

Yeah, and she also taught me how to spell "tsk" too.

*)

You "spell" tsk?


Is this a question or a statement?
 
2012-12-07 06:57:33 PM
You trusted an article written on American education from a British web site? Based on an interview with a teach from Arkansas?

HAHahahahahahahAHHAHAHAHAHAAHahahaha
 
2012-12-07 06:57:53 PM
"How to Turn Critical Thinkers in to Welfare Recipients"

Uhh... elect a community organizer president of the united states -- twice? Did I win an internet?
 
2012-12-07 06:57:55 PM
This seems appropriate.

www.iamstaggered.com
 
2012-12-07 06:58:06 PM

tomasso: OK, the link is both funny and scary, I grant, but something about this does not pass the smell test. Did The Telegraph get punk'd?

First of all, I checked out the Common Core State Standards web page and could find nothing to support any of these assertions. In fact, many of the other claims on the Telegraph page seem to be explicitly contradicted by the Core Standards page. For example, they are certainly not proposing to eliminate or reduce the study of Shakespeare. The site specifically states, "In English‐language arts, the Standards require certain critical content for all students, including: classic myths and stories from around the world, America's Founding Documents, foundational American literature, and Shakespeare."


From the CCSSI ELA (English Language Arts) Standards document:

The bad news:
Distribution of Literary and Informational Passages by Grade in the 2009 NAEP Reading Framework

Grade Literary Informational
4 50% 50%
8 45% 55%
12 30% 70%

The "good" news:

Because the ELA classroom must focus
on literature (stories, drama, and poetry) as well as literary nonfiction, a great
deal of informational reading in grades 6-12 must take place in other classes if
the NAEP assessment framework is to be matched instructionally.

So, it seems to say that the 70% non-fiction you read in high school includes what you read in History, Math and Science classes. So maybe it's not as bad as the articles make it sound?
 
2012-12-07 06:58:26 PM

AssAsInAssassin: Is it any wonder that the monkey's confused?
He said "Mama, Mama, the presiden'ts a fool.
Why do I have to keep reading these technical manuals?"
And the joint chiefs of staff and the brokers on Wall Street said
"Don't make us laugh, you're a smart kid
Time is linear, memory's a stranger, history is for fools,
Man is a tool in the hands of the Great God Almighty."
And they gave him command
of a nuclear submarine
and sent him back
in search of the Garden of Eden.

/Roger Waters

To bow

 
2012-12-07 06:58:56 PM

satanorsanta: Skirl Hutsenreiter: tomasso

There's some examples from the actual Common Core standards here.

It's still got some classic classroom fiction through high school, like Canterbury Tales, Jane Eyre, The Great Gatsby, etc. I would've like reading the History and Math and Science nonfiction, and even the English nonfiction looks good. It's got Walden, but also things like "Politics and the English Language" by Orwell.

This looks like a fantastic curriculum that would be the basis of an excellent education from K-12. Supplement with textbooks and all subjects are covered.


I thought some of the stuff in the later years of elementary school through middle school was a little basic, but then I remembered that I was about 3-4 grade levels ahead of my peers in reading during that time in school. Seriously. Ran in the family too- both my sister and I got through he high school lists in those word recognition tests they give you in 2nd grade or so, and they couldn't finish because they didn't bring the higher level lists. Cleaned up on the prizes they had at elementary and middle school for Advanced Reader (anyone else remember that?).

Yet somehow, none of it made me cool. Can't fathom why.
 
2012-12-07 07:00:09 PM

Ray Vaughn: "How to Turn Critical Thinkers in to Welfare Recipients"

Why would one want to turn in Critical Thinkers? And why would it be to Welfare Recipients?


Good catch! Subby, please report to your English teacher for detention.
 
2012-12-07 07:00:11 PM
Literature teaches the mind to articulate thoughts and apprehend the world, which is a science in and of itself. It rehearses the mind in problem solving, emotional intelligence and moral development.

Manuals teach you how to follow, not think.
 
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