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(New York Daily News)   Journalist witnesses man rescued from approaching train on subway tracks in New York, fails to document incident with series of photos   (nydailynews.com) divider line 4
    More: Followup, New York  
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6343 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Dec 2012 at 1:48 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-07 03:38:08 PM  
2 votes:

downtownkid: JackieRabbit: The real follow-up story from the earlier incident -- the one I note that most of the media is ignoring -- is that that photographer, who has been interviewed about the incident, says he was much too far way from the stricken man to have helped him. He started running to attempt to get there in time and triggered his flash 47 times to try to warn the train's driver. At the last minute he snapped his photo on the run. Several people were standing right there watching the man struggle to get out of the track well and they did nothing to help.


Sure, that's what the photographer said. Oddly the very pictures he shot directly contradict his statements. They appear to be taken from a fairly close distance, and you can see no other passengers in between the camera and the victim. Also, if the photographer really were running towards the man he wouldn't have a clear picture as the camera wouldn't be steadied. Finally, he fired his flash 47 times? You're telling me that in the heat of the moment with a train bearing down on the victim the photographer counted how many times he fired his flash?

All due respect, but everything you said sounds like complete horses hit.


Other witnesses have corroborated his story, as do the security cameras in the station. He's telling the truth; the police are satisfied with his story. He is also upset that the post published the pictures, but he could not stop them. He was on assignment for them and they owned the pictures. You are obviously not a photographer and have not used a professional flash. Mine, like his, has a counter to tell you how many flashes it has performed and how many are left before a recharge is needed. And, if you were a photographer, you'd look at that photo and see the obvious camera shake and understand that this indicates he was on the move and probably shooting with a zoom lens. And you know what, I don't really care about what you think is horse shiat. You, like so many others, read some sensationalist crap on the internet, let your emotions overrule logic and convicted him in your mind instantly. I waited for the facts to come out.
2012-12-07 02:42:39 PM  
2 votes:

JackieRabbit: The real follow-up story from the earlier incident -- the one I note that most of the media is ignoring -- is that that photographer, who has been interviewed about the incident, says he was much too far way from the stricken man to have helped him. He started running to attempt to get there in time and triggered his flash 47 times to try to warn the train's driver. At the last minute he snapped his photo on the run. Several people were standing right there watching the man struggle to get out of the track well and they did nothing to help.



Sure, that's what the photographer said. Oddly the very pictures he shot directly contradict his statements. They appear to be taken from a fairly close distance, and you can see no other passengers in between the camera and the victim. Also, if the photographer really were running towards the man he wouldn't have a clear picture as the camera wouldn't be steadied. Finally, he fired his flash 47 times? You're telling me that in the heat of the moment with a train bearing down on the victim the photographer counted how many times he fired his flash?

All due respect, but everything you said sounds like complete horses hit.
2012-12-07 02:31:18 PM  
1 votes:
The real question is, why don't they have recessed hand and foot holdings lit up all around where the trains come in. That way if you're on the farking tracks, you've got but 5-10ft to get to something you can climb the fark out with.

And if you ever do try to rescue someone, lay flat on your belly so they are less likely to drag you in.
2012-12-07 02:17:35 PM  
1 votes:
Something I just don't understand about subways in the states. Keep in mind that I live a town without subways. The trains stop at the station in pre-arranged, consistent positions. This is why they have the tape laid out that shows where the doors will be. So why the fark don't they have railings along the damn edges!??!
 
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