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(STLToday)   Pharmaceutical company "loses" $700,000 worth of gold dust. Now you know why your prescriptions cost so much   (stltoday.com) divider line 66
    More: Dumbass, refiners, prescription drugs, St. Louis County, gold prospecting  
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6990 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Dec 2012 at 10:29 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-07 12:18:55 PM
It was probably secretly confiscated by Federales impersonators. No doubt when asked for identification, they told the Pharmaceutical Company rep:

"BADGES? We don't got no badges! I don't have to show you no stinkin' BADGES!"
 
2012-12-07 12:25:19 PM

DysphoricMania: "Gold dust is really fine and it can be blown into the wind,"

I call shenanigans....


And yet, that is the answer, my friend. It's blowing in the wind.
 
2012-12-07 12:57:58 PM

lennavan:
Hehe yeah those are tough. It's all just mixing clear chemicals that may as well be water. I gave a talk to 5th graders awhile back and the chem research lab here gave me a cobalt synthesis reaction that looks like SCIENCE! It was synthesis of CTC-96 and the precursor starts as pink, turns immediately to blue upon addition of a colorless solution and then over time (about an hour) proceeds through green to ultimately brown.


That's the magic of transition metals. Depending on what ligands you put on the metal, you can change the colour. Just yesterday I made a compound that started out green (looked like Kool-Aid in solution), added something to make it a purple solid, then filtered off that solid and did a reaction with it. It immediately turned orange.

Inorganic chemistry is so much more exciting that organic. The air-free aspect is kinda annoying, though.

Felgraf:
Nanorods are even more clever. I haven't done it, but if I remember right:
You basically perform a nanoparticle synthesis reaction in a mixture of water+some chemical/protein that forms micelles. Then, you get the reaction occuring *within* the water (or chemical, don't remember which) formed miceles, which gives it a preferred axis of growth...


A grad student who continued on with my nanoproject discovered that if you irradiate silver nanoparticles with certain wavelengths of light, you could selectively grow then such that they turned the colour of the light you were using. You can probably grasp the physics better than I can. I think it had something to do with different crystal faces and plasmons.

Link

Seriously, dude, photolysis will solve all your problems. Citrate is for sissies, photons are for physicists.
 
2012-12-07 01:06:59 PM
There are many interesting reactions catalyzed by gold, but its usually as an ion or a dispersion of Au0 on some sort of matrix. I can't think of any where you just huck in a chunk of gold metal and stir it up.
 
2012-12-07 01:19:45 PM
Also, a prof once said "it used to be that you'd add a metal to a reaction and it turned black you'd start cursing because your reaction was ruined. Now you say you've made nanoparticles and start thinking of which journal to submit it to."

Of course nanoparticles are old now. If you want to get published its all about the nanodongs
 
2012-12-07 01:24:24 PM

poorjon: Also, a prof once said "it used to be that you'd add a metal to a reaction and it turned black you'd start cursing because your reaction was ruined. Now you say you've made nanoparticles and start thinking of which journal to submit it to."

Of course nanoparticles are old now. If you want to get published its all about the nanodongs


Hah! How true.

We did a paper in lit meeting yesterday where the authors claimed nanoparticles had formed and were catalysing the reaction, and then never bothered to look for them.

/surely there's a TEM somewhere in Switzerland
 
2012-12-07 01:32:21 PM

Bondith: A grad student who continued on with my nanoproject discovered that if you irradiate silver nanoparticles with certain wavelengths of light, you could selectively grow then such that they turned the colour of the light you were using. You can probably grasp the physics better than I can. I think it had something to do with different crystal faces and plasmons.

Link

Seriously, dude, photolysis will solve all your problems. Citrate is for sissies, photons are for physicists.


I actually think someone else in our group was making particles based on that. We're just using particles as a base for testing other things that involve Surface Plasmon resonance, so simple spheres are often good enough!
 
2012-12-07 01:40:46 PM
d1.endata.cx
Maybe she used it...
 
2012-12-07 02:02:34 PM

Bondith: photolysis will solve all your problems


As someone who is stupid enough to have made a photoreaction the crux of his thesis, I have to say you are wrong there. Sure, photochem looks so straight forward and clean on paper, but before you know it results have taken a serious turn for the weird and you're all worried about stuff like oscillator strength and triplet states when all you wanted to do in the first place was have a neat way to stick two molecules together.

Bondith: We did a paper in lit meeting yesterday where the authors claimed nanoparticles had formed and were catalysing the reaction, and then never bothered to look for them.


And the refs never asked to see them either? Sweet babby jeebus the peer review system is broken.
 
2012-12-07 02:13:32 PM

poorjon: Bondith: photolysis will solve all your problems

As someone who is stupid enough to have made a photoreaction the crux of his thesis, I have to say you are wrong there. Sure, photochem looks so straight forward and clean on paper, but before you know it results have taken a serious turn for the weird and you're all worried about stuff like oscillator strength and triplet states when all you wanted to do in the first place was have a neat way to stick two molecules together.


I feel your pain. At least you have results, though. I just got my seminar flushed by my committee because they told me I couldn't write a thesis based on things not working. I'm stuck in the salt mines for another semester. I thought I'd been done with labwork twice before.

Photolysis might solve all Felgraf's problems, though (and I'm not just saying that because my M.Sc. was all about photolysis of nanoparticles. OK, well, maybe I am.)

Bondith: We did a paper in lit meeting yesterday where the authors claimed nanoparticles had formed and were catalysing the reaction, and then never bothered to look for them.

And the refs never asked to see them either? Sweet babby jeebus the peer review system is broken.


That was the consensus at the meeting, too. They did do the standard add-Hg-and-see-if-it-kills-the-reaction experiment to see if it was heterogeneous (it was), and they filtered it halfway through and saw a drop-off in reactivity (again suggesting it's heterogeneous), but I would argue filtration with pores on the micrometre wouldn't catch nanoparticles.
 
2012-12-07 03:17:44 PM
interprep.com

/wanted for questioning
 
2012-12-07 03:21:51 PM

Felgraf: lennavan: This is most likely a stupid follow-up question but what does the structure look like when you are done? I guess I always imagined hollow and shaped like a buckyball because of the name nanosphere and I only ever concern myself with what it is coated in. But I don't see how the sphere assembles from that reaction.

You basically get an oblong sphere, but it's not hollow: It's completely solid. (You can MAKE hollow nanospheres, through.. witchcraft, I think). I don't know *why* they're spherical: I'm not a chemist, so i admit some of it is like magic to me. I think it has something to do with the way the citric acid reduces the gold. That said, it is a fairly homogenous population (varying by a few nm in diameter, when I've tried), but it is possible to purify them further: Whether via filtration or timed centrifugation (the heavier/larger particles with centrifuge out first!) or whatever. All the nanoparticles *will* be homogenous in their surface/what's chemically bound to the surface, for the most part. (Which is why they don't just drop out of solution)

Nanorods are even more clever. I haven't done it, but if I remember right:
You basically perform a nanoparticle synthesis reaction in a mixture of water+some chemical/protein that forms micelles. Then, you get the reaction occuring *within* the water (or chemical, don't remember which) formed miceles, which gives it a preferred axis of growth...


The best way to make different shapes is through surfactants (soaps, fats, etc.), like you said they can control growth on one side or another and make a whole host of shapes. I've seen nanorods, nanosquares, nanopyrimids, etc. How they find a shape is usually trial and error and as Felgraf mentioned it above it can be a pain sometimes because people don't know how to write a proper experimental and leave out entire steps of a reaction. I think the reason why they had gold dust was for 2 reasons #1) Dust is much easier to weigh out in small portions and #2) High surface area means a faster reaction when dissolving it in aqua regia.
 
2012-12-07 03:40:21 PM

BalugaJoe: wanted for questioning:

[doctorwhotoys.net image 212x550]


Came for old school cybermen, leaving happy

HindiDiscoMonster: [d1.endata.cx image 640x480]
Maybe she used it...


Where does that pic originate? For research purposes, of course
 
2012-12-07 04:48:58 PM
ihaveanidea.org
Tiny giraffe do not come cheap.
 
2012-12-07 06:32:39 PM
Why does everybody think prices are tied to costs? They're going to make the most money possible, without regard to costs. There's no instance where they think they could get more and don't charge it. Costs might make them reevaluate their price, but certainly don't cause an increase.
 
2012-12-08 11:02:29 AM
cache.gawker.com
 
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