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(Some Guy)   Want to watch movies on the same day as the theater release? No problem, all you need is a fingerprint...and $500 per movie   (primacinema.com) divider line 59
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4237 clicks; posted to Geek » on 07 Dec 2012 at 11:10 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-07 10:05:03 AM
And apparently the player itself costs $35,000. From what I've read on other websites, the fingerprint scanner is designed to make sure no one but those you designate can make a $500 purchase. Don't want little Ashley waking up early and deciding to buy the new Justin Bieber concert film.
 
2012-12-07 11:14:29 AM

Want to watch movies on the same day as the theater release? No


There ya go.
 
2012-12-07 11:16:40 AM
Business 101: It's easier to get $1 from 1000 people than $1000 from one person.

Anyone think Hollywood will ever figure that out?
 
2012-12-07 11:17:37 AM
This seems like a solution in search of a problem.

And by solution I mean horribly overpriced gimmick.
 
2012-12-07 11:24:26 AM
My favorite is their line about "better clarity and deeper colors" than Blu-Ray players... Yeah, HDMI is HDMI. Better bitrate for better "clarity" is possible (but predownloading better than 40gb per movie? Yeah, good luck with that), but deeper colors? Yeah, right. Next you'll be telling me about warmer sounds
 
2012-12-07 11:26:16 AM
To be frank, this looks more like a concept pitch than a real business.
 
2012-12-07 11:30:47 AM
If only there was a way to see a movie on the day it comes out for something like $20 or less, with a much, much larger screen and a more advanced sound system. I'd think that would be a possibility.
 
2012-12-07 11:33:26 AM
If you think your time is worth $500/ half hour then go ahead and buy this. Otherwise, the line in the movie theater while it may look daunting is not as long as it actually seems. You can seriously show up 10 minutes before the show and still get a decent seat usually.
 
2012-12-07 11:33:46 AM
I guess it's not a terrible idea were it not for the gigantic upfront cost. I'd bet I could get a dozen friends to throw down $50 to watch The Hobbit in someone's basement with $100 left over for pizza and beer.
 
2012-12-07 11:42:21 AM
I'm pretty sure that the people this is marketed to can easily afford something like this and probably need it.

People like celebrities, professional athletes, etc. who wouldn't get a moment's peace going out in public.

Which is why the concept seems a bit extreme to the average Farker.

And, let's face it, if I could afford something like this, I'm sure it would be a welcome relief from the screaming kids, people who talk on their cellphone, etc. that always seem to inhabit the theater when I am there.
 
2012-12-07 11:43:41 AM
Meh, if I'd hit that half billion dollar lottery last week, I'd have considered it. Right now, I'll concentrate on paying my electric bill.
 
2012-12-07 11:46:23 AM

AngryDragon: Business 101: It's easier to get $1 from 1000 people than $1000 from one person.

Anyone think Hollywood will ever figure that out?


This service is for people who can afford to build complete home theaters with 30+ seats in their basement. To be honest, if I were rich I'd actually consider something like this.
 
2012-12-07 11:48:04 AM
Subby's Mother:
My favorite is their line about "better clarity and deeper colors" than Blu-Ray players... Yeah, HDMI is HDMI. Better bitrate for better "clarity" is possible (but predownloading better than 40gb per movie? Yeah, good luck with that), but deeper colors? Yeah, right. Next you'll be telling me about warmer sounds

You mean aside from 4:2:2 sampling capability instead of 4:2:0? Yes, you can see the difference.

(HDMI can carry 4:4:4, by the way, it's just not used very much)
 
2012-12-07 11:50:54 AM
Subby. you can watch a movie the same day as the movie release by....wait for it...going to the movie theater.
 
2012-12-07 11:51:47 AM

Subby's Mother: My favorite is their line about "better clarity and deeper colors" than Blu-Ray players... Yeah, HDMI is HDMI. Better bitrate for better "clarity" is possible (but predownloading better than 40gb per movie? Yeah, good luck with that), but deeper colors? Yeah, right. Next you'll be telling me about warmer sounds


That gave me a good chuckle. The only way to get "deeper" anything is to get a decent display with a darker black. My cheapo LCD TV has more of a dark, dark grey than black. At least for a $35k box that uses $500 movies, it uses uncompressed audio instead of lossy. You'd better be getting the top-of-the-line audio/visual experience for that price.

"Warm" sounds from vinyl are equally laughable. The only noticeable difference to some people is when audio is compressed. That's why I rip whatever music I find (whether a CD or $5 album from Wild Bill's to FLAC. Of course, hearing the nearly-uncompressed sound isn't the reason to encode to FLAC. FLAC uses lossless compression, while MP3 is 'lossy'. What this means is that for each year the MP3 sits on your hard drive, it will lose roughly 12kbps, assuming you have SATA - it's about 15kbps on IDE, but only 7kbps on SCSI, due to rotational velocidensity. You don't want to know how much worse it is on CD-ROM or other optical media.

I started collecting MP3s in about 2001, and if I try to play any of the tracks I downloaded back then, even the stuff I grabbed at 320kbps, they just sound like crap. The bass is terrible, the midrange...well don't get me started. Some of those albums have degraded down to 32 or even 16kbps. FLAC rips from the same period still sound great, even if they weren't stored correctly, in a cool, dry place. Seriously, stick to FLAC, you may not be able to hear the difference now, but in a year or two, you'll be glad you did.
 
2012-12-07 11:51:56 AM
This don't a bad idea. Its a niche market product designed to appeal highly to that market. I can easily see them making their business work.

I just wish I had an income high enough to get it.

Wonder how long before pirates abuse it for perfect movie rips.
 
2012-12-07 11:56:33 AM

error 303: I guess it's not a terrible idea were it not for the gigantic upfront cost. I'd bet I could get a dozen friends to throw down $50 to watch The Hobbit in someone's basement with $100 left over for pizza and beer.


Your dozen friends are stupid.
 
2012-12-07 11:58:16 AM

Inquisitive Inquisitor: This service is for people who can afford to build complete home theaters with 30+ seats in their basement. To be honest, if I were rich I'd actually consider something like this.


Me too. We scoff, but I don't think your average Farker is the target audience for this product.
 
2012-12-07 11:59:03 AM

Mrbogey: This don't a bad idea. Its a niche market product designed to appeal highly to that market. I can easily see them making their business work.

I just wish I had an income high enough to get it.

Wonder how long before pirates abuse it for perfect movie rips.


Why in the hell would a pirate use a setup like this? Pirates don't typically make money off movie rips. They put them online to torrent sites and don't get a damned thing. Maybe you could find some idiot peddling these perfect rips at a flea market somewhere or some shiat, but at $500 a crack plus time, and the cost of burnable dvd's they'd have to sell a shiat load of them to just break even, much less make a profit.
 
2012-12-07 11:59:21 AM

Subby's Mother: My favorite is their line about "better clarity and deeper colors" than Blu-Ray players... Yeah, HDMI is HDMI. Better bitrate for better "clarity" is possible (but predownloading better than 40gb per movie? Yeah, good luck with that), but deeper colors? Yeah, right. Next you'll be telling me about warmer sounds


I have a guy I my apt complex who works for best buy.

He has bought the 800$ HDMI cable propaganda entirely and was arguing with several people about how the things work 'better' than a 3$ cable.

I honestly only know HDMI is digital, which means all there or not. No real quality variation, and the 'faraday cage' mesh around the cable isnt at all necessary unless youre running some massive Hz through those things. But can anyone explain how to break it down to him and explain its pure marketing bullshiat?
 
2012-12-07 12:00:14 PM

kittyhas1000legs: Of course, hearing the nearly-uncompressed sound isn't the reason to encode to FLAC. FLAC uses lossless compression, while MP3 is 'lossy'. What this means is that for each year the MP3 sits on your hard drive, it will lose roughly 12kbps, assuming you have SATA - it's about 15kbps on IDE, but only 7kbps on SCSI, due to rotational velocidensity.


i0.kym-cdn.com
 
2012-12-07 12:00:14 PM
Every Sunday night at this guy's place.
www.mediabistro.com
 
2012-12-07 12:00:54 PM

kittyhas1000legs: "Warm" sounds from vinyl are equally laughable.


Very well done.

Starts off sensical and has a good transition. I'll go 8.5/10.
 
2012-12-07 12:02:09 PM

kittyhas1000legs: Subby's Mother: My favorite is their line about "better clarity and deeper colors" than Blu-Ray players... Yeah, HDMI is HDMI. Better bitrate for better "clarity" is possible (but predownloading better than 40gb per movie? Yeah, good luck with that), but deeper colors? Yeah, right. Next you'll be telling me about warmer sounds

That gave me a good chuckle. The only way to get "deeper" anything is to get a decent display with a darker black. My cheapo LCD TV has more of a dark, dark grey than black. At least for a $35k box that uses $500 movies, it uses uncompressed audio instead of lossy. You'd better be getting the top-of-the-line audio/visual experience for that price.

"Warm" sounds from vinyl are equally laughable. The only noticeable difference to some people is when audio is compressed. That's why I rip whatever music I find (whether a CD or $5 album from Wild Bill's to FLAC. Of course, hearing the nearly-uncompressed sound isn't the reason to encode to FLAC. FLAC uses lossless compression, while MP3 is 'lossy'. What this means is that for each year the MP3 sits on your hard drive, it will lose roughly 12kbps, assuming you have SATA - it's about 15kbps on IDE, but only 7kbps on SCSI, due to rotational velocidensity. You don't want to know how much worse it is on CD-ROM or other optical media.

I started collecting MP3s in about 2001, and if I try to play any of the tracks I downloaded back then, even the stuff I grabbed at 320kbps, they just sound like crap. The bass is terrible, the midrange...well don't get me started. Some of those albums have degraded down to 32 or even 16kbps. FLAC rips from the same period still sound great, even if they weren't stored correctly, in a cool, dry place. Seriously, stick to FLAC, you may not be able to hear the difference now, but in a year or two, you'll be glad you did.


Are you employed at Best Buy, or are you a marketer for Monster?
 
2012-12-07 12:03:42 PM
I can't think of a single movie ever released I would pay $500 to see.
 
2012-12-07 12:09:15 PM
This is for people like BronBron who can't really take the kids to the movies.
 
2012-12-07 12:11:17 PM
Or knowledge of the internet and how to download things.
 
2012-12-07 12:11:56 PM

USA Prime Credit Peggy: error 303: I guess it's not a terrible idea were it not for the gigantic upfront cost. I'd bet I could get a dozen friends to throw down $50 to watch The Hobbit in someone's basement with $100 left over for pizza and beer.

Your dozen friends are stupid.


Jokes on you, I don't even have a dozen friends!
 
2012-12-07 12:13:51 PM
this is targeted at people in show business who have full theaters in their house of the ultra rich or enjoy movies but don't want to be bothered by people texting, talking or being annoying during a film.

If they can get the equipment cost under $500 and the per movie fee under $100 it will catch on for the general public.
 
2012-12-07 12:15:42 PM
I wonder what the EULA is on this thing? What stops a school from buying it and releasing movies as a fundraiser? Most auditoriums hold a good 150 people you charge $7 a pop and you could make some decent money.
 
2012-12-07 12:19:25 PM

TNel: I wonder what the EULA is on this thing? What stops a school from buying it and releasing movies as a fundraiser? Most auditoriums hold a good 150 people you charge $7 a pop and you could make some decent money.


My high school sort of did that with DVDs. Because they can't legally make money from showing the movie (at least according to one teacher) they instead sold food/drinks and strongly urged you to donate to whatever club/charity/etc.
 
2012-12-07 12:27:01 PM

Dingleberry Dickwad: Why in the hell would a pirate use a setup like this? Pirates don't typically make money off movie rips. They put them online to torrent sites and don't get a damned thing. Maybe you could find some idiot peddling these perfect rips at a flea market somewhere or some shiat, but at $500 a crack plus time, and the cost of burnable dvd's they'd have to sell a shiat load of them to just break even, much less make a profit.


Not only that but the movies will be watermarked so if you do rip it somehow and it hits the net you'll get the living shiat sued out of you.
 
2012-12-07 12:32:40 PM

Dingleberry Dickwad: Mrbogey: This don't a bad idea. Its a niche market product designed to appeal highly to that market. I can easily see them making their business work.

I just wish I had an income high enough to get it.

Wonder how long before pirates abuse it for perfect movie rips.

Why in the hell would a pirate use a setup like this? Pirates don't typically make money off movie rips. They put them online to torrent sites and don't get a damned thing. Maybe you could find some idiot peddling these perfect rips at a flea market somewhere or some shiat, but at $500 a crack plus time, and the cost of burnable dvd's they'd have to sell a shiat load of them to just break even, much less make a profit.


The piracy scene in Asia is very different than NA. You can't go on a subway or train in most Chinese cities without seeing someone selling DVDs/Blurays for $1 or $2 each. They range from direct copies from a legitimate copy to a camera in theaters.

If there was a way for them to sell theater quality rips the day they came out in the US some criminal organization in China or southeast asia would find a way to make it work.
 
2012-12-07 12:33:21 PM
kittyhas1000legs:
That gave me a good chuckle. The only way to get "deeper" anything is to get a decent display with a darker black.

Not so. A lot of colors are just plain not represented by the standard color space.

Some of the newer displays and projectors will handle much larger dynamic and color ranges - quite a bit more range between "white" and "black," along with a greatly expanded color space You know - the sort of systems you find in really expensive home theater setups, like the target market for the gadget in the story.

Almost all "normal" displays use the normal HDTV BT709 color space, which shows just a bit over half of "visible colors." Mostly, they lose a lot of cyan and green. An LCD with LED backlighting can show about 80% of the full color space (Sony Bravia, for example), and a laser-driven projector can, in theory, hit about 97% of available colors.

The term you need to look for is "xvYCC." It's also called "extended gamut" in a lot of places.

/one side effect of having better color space coverage is that a lot of green things look REALLY green, and some folks don't like that...
 
2012-12-07 12:51:02 PM
I wonder how much the Monster cables for this thing cost?
 
2012-12-07 12:56:30 PM

Carth: Dingleberry Dickwad: Mrbogey: This don't a bad idea. Its a niche market product designed to appeal highly to that market. I can easily see them making their business work.

I just wish I had an income high enough to get it.

Wonder how long before pirates abuse it for perfect movie rips.

Why in the hell would a pirate use a setup like this? Pirates don't typically make money off movie rips. They put them online to torrent sites and don't get a damned thing. Maybe you could find some idiot peddling these perfect rips at a flea market somewhere or some shiat, but at $500 a crack plus time, and the cost of burnable dvd's they'd have to sell a shiat load of them to just break even, much less make a profit.

The piracy scene in Asia is very different than NA. You can't go on a subway or train in most Chinese cities without seeing someone selling DVDs/Blurays for $1 or $2 each. They range from direct copies from a legitimate copy to a camera in theaters.

If there was a way for them to sell theater quality rips the day they came out in the US some criminal organization in China or southeast asia would find a way to make it work.


At $2 a crack they'd still have to sell a shiatton of each movie just to break even. Of course I know fark all about black market dvd's in China, but are you saying that each distributor of the burned dvd's would realistically sell enough of each individual title to not only make back the $500 per title cost, but the cost of the burnable dvd's plus cost of paying whatever pittance they pay the flunkie on the street selling them plus still make enough of a profit to make it worth their while? I mean I know the market for burned movies is large over there, but really?
 
2012-12-07 01:06:15 PM

kittyhas1000legs: Seriously, stick to FLAC, you may not be able to hear the difference now, but in a year or two, you'll be glad you did.


The primary benefit to FLAC (or any lossless) isn't sound quality. That's a stupid argument because it's highly subjective and every set of ears and speakers are different. The real benefit is ARCHIVING, so that no matter what happens in the future, you have a pristine copy of the original and can convert it to whatever the hell you want without quality loss. I can choose any bitrate or format I want when transferring to portables.

I appreciate the snarkiness of your post, but it sounds more like a childish b*tch-fit directed at people who don't things exactly as you do than anything. But hey, I'm not the format police, so have at it.
 
2012-12-07 01:10:43 PM
37 comments, ....
37!!!! and no1 thought to mention : "No moar having to watch screeners or wait until the DVD/Blu-ray is released for good quality torrents "???
 
2012-12-07 01:14:21 PM

dickfreckle: I appreciate the snarkiness of your post, but it sounds more like a childish b*tch-fit directed at people who don't things exactly as you do than anything. But hey, I'm not the format police, so have at it.


I think he was trolling, tbqh. I got a laugh out of the "MP3s losing bit rate" part.
 
2012-12-07 01:17:01 PM

JKDGreg: 37 comments, ....
37!!!! and no1 thought to mention : "No moar having to watch screeners or wait until the DVD/Blu-ray is released for good quality torrents "???


In a row?
 
2012-12-07 01:23:07 PM
Who are the people who "need" this service exactly?
 
2012-12-07 01:23:28 PM

Dingleberry Dickwad: Carth: Dingleberry Dickwad: Mrbogey: This don't a bad idea. Its a niche market product designed to appeal highly to that market. I can easily see them making their business work.

I just wish I had an income high enough to get it.

Wonder how long before pirates abuse it for perfect movie rips.

Why in the hell would a pirate use a setup like this? Pirates don't typically make money off movie rips. They put them online to torrent sites and don't get a damned thing. Maybe you could find some idiot peddling these perfect rips at a flea market somewhere or some shiat, but at $500 a crack plus time, and the cost of burnable dvd's they'd have to sell a shiat load of them to just break even, much less make a profit.

The piracy scene in Asia is very different than NA. You can't go on a subway or train in most Chinese cities without seeing someone selling DVDs/Blurays for $1 or $2 each. They range from direct copies from a legitimate copy to a camera in theaters.

If there was a way for them to sell theater quality rips the day they came out in the US some criminal organization in China or southeast asia would find a way to make it work.

At $2 a crack they'd still have to sell a shiatton of each movie just to break even. Of course I know fark all about black market dvd's in China, but are you saying that each distributor of the burned dvd's would realistically sell enough of each individual title to not only make back the $500 per title cost, but the cost of the burnable dvd's plus cost of paying whatever pittance they pay the flunkie on the street selling them plus still make enough of a profit to make it worth their while? I mean I know the market for burned movies is large over there, but really?


I was told the supply for almost all the movies comes from one or two huge distributors out of southern china. They press the DVDs on the same machines retail DVDs are made so they aren't really burned. I don't know enough about their profit margins to say if it the $35,000 equipment cost, and $500 a title fee would make it worth it to them but I wouldn't be surprised. The small little DVD shop by my house said she sold around 100 discs a day and there are about 5 similar shops on my street not counting all the peddlers who hang out on the corners.

I've been back in North America for a few years now so I"m sure sites like kankan.cn have cut into their sales. I just thought it was interesting how the whole market worked there and how different it is than in US/Canada.
 
2012-12-07 01:24:45 PM

Glitchwerks: dickfreckle: I appreciate the snarkiness of your post, but it sounds more like a childish b*tch-fit directed at people who don't things exactly as you do than anything. But hey, I'm not the format police, so have at it.

I think he was trolling, tbqh. I got a laugh out of the "MP3s losing bit rate" part.


Yeah, you're probably right. I may have mistaken it for a "OMG people who use FLAC are assholes LOL" bit, because I've seen them here before. I thought it was a mockery of some lossless proponent's annoying habit of attacking mp3's sound quality (which I do not - listen to it all the time on my portables).

/still working on that list you made
 
2012-12-07 01:55:59 PM

kittyhas1000legs: Subby's Mother: My favorite is their line about "better clarity and deeper colors" than Blu-Ray players... Yeah, HDMI is HDMI. Better bitrate for better "clarity" is possible (but predownloading better than 40gb per movie? Yeah, good luck with that), but deeper colors? Yeah, right. Next you'll be telling me about warmer sounds

That gave me a good chuckle. The only way to get "deeper" anything is to get a decent display with a darker black. My cheapo LCD TV has more of a dark, dark grey than black. At least for a $35k box that uses $500 movies, it uses uncompressed audio instead of lossy. You'd better be getting the top-of-the-line audio/visual experience for that price.

"Warm" sounds from vinyl are equally laughable. The only noticeable difference to some people is when audio is compressed. That's why I rip whatever music I find (whether a CD or $5 album from Wild Bill's to FLAC. Of course, hearing the nearly-uncompressed sound isn't the reason to encode to FLAC. FLAC uses lossless compression, while MP3 is 'lossy'. What this means is that for each year the MP3 sits on your hard drive, it will lose roughly 12kbps, assuming you have SATA - it's about 15kbps on IDE, but only 7kbps on SCSI, due to rotational velocidensity. You don't want to know how much worse it is on CD-ROM or other optical media.

I started collecting MP3s in about 2001, and if I try to play any of the tracks I downloaded back then, even the stuff I grabbed at 320kbps, they just sound like crap. The bass is terrible, the midrange...well don't get me started. Some of those albums have degraded down to 32 or even 16kbps. FLAC rips from the same period still sound great, even if they weren't stored correctly, in a cool, dry place. Seriously, stick to FLAC, you may not be able to hear the difference now, but in a year or two, you'll be glad you did.


than again...
 
2012-12-07 01:58:31 PM

Carth: this is targeted at people in show business who have full theaters in their house of the ultra rich or enjoy movies but don't want to be bothered by people texting, talking or being annoying during a film.


And who don't want to be hounded in public. If even 10% of the population recognized me and either started in awe, bugged me for an autograph or just started snapping cell phone pictures wherever I went, I would avoid going out in public too.

I saw Ron Howard with his family at Disney World a couple of years after Happy Days ended. He was wearing a hat and big sunglasses trying to look inconspicuous but it only took about a minute before everyone waiting in line for Mr. Toad's Wild Ride was staring at him. And that was Richie Cunningham. Can you imagine if it had been Fonzi?
 
2012-12-07 02:01:26 PM
Want to watch movies on the same day as the theater release? No problem, all you need is a fingerprint...and $500 per movie an internet connection

Fixed for accuracy.
 
2012-12-07 02:06:56 PM

AngryDragon: Business 101: It's easier to get $1 from 1000 people than $1000 from one person.

Anyone think Hollywood will ever figure that out?


As a rough guesstimate? I figure they'll sell at least 100,000 of these.

Rich people don't go to the local theatre... And they've run out of toys to buy.
 
2012-12-07 03:21:16 PM
The fact that kittyhas1000legs says to store MP3s in a "cool, dry place" to preserve format should have tipped most of you off...
 
2012-12-07 03:23:34 PM

kittyhas1000legs: TNel: I wonder what the EULA is on this thing? What stops a school from buying it and releasing movies as a fundraiser? Most auditoriums hold a good 150 people you charge $7 a pop and you could make some decent money.

My high school sort of did that with DVDs. Because they can't legally make money from showing the movie (at least according to one teacher) they instead sold food/drinks and strongly urged you to donate to whatever club/charity/etc.


My college did it, too, but not as a fundraiser. There was a club that got funding from the school and organized it all. They picked unusual but fun movies, too. And since they already had all the AV equipment, the club's biggest cost was pizza.
 
2012-12-07 03:30:29 PM
Or, become a voting member of AMPAS, VES, ASIFA or similar organization ... and the movie studios will send you screener DVDs during Oscar season, for free.

/watched Wreck-It Ralph in the privacy of my living room last night ... all "above-board," and completely legal.
 
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