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(BBC)   Interactive map of the London Blitz shows just how many bombs contributed to 1.4m homeless in just 6 months   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 40
    More: Scary, University of Portsmouth, bombing raids, british press  
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4759 clicks; posted to Geek » on 07 Dec 2012 at 9:29 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-07 08:46:30 AM
That's very cool indeed. My school had a little display case with shrapnel, and photos of a bomb that fell on the grounds and the damage it wrought, yet it isn't listed on the map. So i'm sure there's even more than the map suggests, which just goes to show how many bombs fell.
 
2012-12-07 09:18:30 AM
(Waits patiently for the Bristol, Liverpool, Coventry, Manchester, Glasgow, Greenock, Belfast, Clydeside, Norwich, Portsmouth and Exeter versions.)
 
2012-12-07 09:36:52 AM
Should have just nuked.
 
2012-12-07 09:39:53 AM
Jesus. Did Hermann Göring once get laughed at when trying to buy a blow job in Hyde Park? What they hell were they concentrating there for?
 
2012-12-07 09:44:38 AM
Hey ho, let's go
Hey ho, let's go
 
2012-12-07 09:47:09 AM
So this is everywhere Tyrone Slothrop has had sex?
 
2012-12-07 09:47:53 AM

0Icky0: Jesus. Did Hermann Göring once get laughed at when trying to buy a blow job in Hyde Park? What they hell were they concentrating there for?


Well to be fair, he was wearing a dress, weighed 350 pounds, and was jazzed off his tits on pills at time, and was shouting that he was "eine kliene teapot".
 
2012-12-07 09:55:56 AM
Don't say that he's hypocritical
Say rather that he's apolitical
"Once the rockets are up, who cares where they come down
That's not my department," says Wernher von Braun

Some have harsh words for this man of renown
But some think our attitude should be one of gratitude
Like the widows and cripples in old London town
Who owe their large pensions to Wernher von Braun
 
2012-12-07 10:19:50 AM
It's not their fault they do not know
The birdsong from the radio,
It's not their fault they often go
To Maidenhead


And talk of sport and makes of cars
In various bogus-Tudor bars
And daren't look up and see the stars
But belch instead.


In labour-saving homes, with care
Their wives frizz out peroxide hair
And dry it in synthetic air
And paint their nails.


Come, friendly bombs and fall on Slough
To get it ready for the plough.
The cabbages are coming now;
The earth exhales.

/the farking thing was published in 1937. I wonder if they took the author out and shot him
 
2012-12-07 10:26:07 AM

Jiro Dreams Of McRibs: /the farking thing was published in 1937. I wonder if they took the author out and shot him


pedrowatcher.ocregister.com
 
2012-12-07 10:34:30 AM
That's insane. It also explains where all the dentist offices went.
 
2012-12-07 10:35:34 AM

0Icky0: Jesus. Did Hermann Göring once get laughed at when trying to buy a blow job in Hyde Park? What they hell were they concentrating there for?


During the war, AA batteries were stationed in Hyde Park. The goal of bombing it was to neutralize London's aerial defense so that further bombers could operate without being fired upon.
 
2012-12-07 10:36:36 AM

cgraves67: 0Icky0: Jesus. Did Hermann Göring once get laughed at when trying to buy a blow job in Hyde Park? What they hell were they concentrating there for?

During the war, AA batteries were stationed in Hyde Park. The goal of bombing it was to neutralize London's aerial defense so that further bombers could operate without being fired upon.


Sigh. And by AA batteries, I mean anti-aircraft guns.
 
2012-12-07 10:47:15 AM

cgraves67: Sigh. And by AA batteries, I mean anti-aircraft guns.


Oh...I thought this might be the reason that the British developed the button cell.
Smaller target.
 
2012-12-07 10:52:56 AM

WhiskeySticks: That's insane. It also explains where all the dentist offices went.


That's really good. Take a 15 years old Simpsons joke and make it your own. And it's even funnier because the OECD reported that British dental health is the best in the world, so you put that twist on it too. Bravo! AOL and myspace must be quaking in their boots in case you come after them!
 
2012-12-07 11:19:25 AM
I live in a tiny patch of the East End that was untouched. At the end of our road is the site of the first V-1 bomb that fell on London. Not far from us in Bethnal Green was the site of the deadliest civilian incident in WWII - almost 200 people killed in a tube station in a stampede. The Brits suffered tremendously in WWII - I think we easily forget that since they weren't invaded by troops.
 
2012-12-07 11:24:25 AM
Polly Churchill and James Dunworthy unavailable for comment.

/I get to do this reference twice in two days? Life is good.
 
2012-12-07 11:29:58 AM

WhiskeySticks: That's insane. It also explains where all the dentist offices went.


This is the funniest awful thing I have ever read on Fark. Jolly good show old horse!
 
2012-12-07 11:33:54 AM

LazarusLong42: Polly Churchill and James Dunworthy unavailable for comment.

/I get to do this reference twice in two days? Life is good.


I first came across these books by someone making a reference on Fark - I've bought a few previously-unknown-to-me authors because Farkers are literate.
 
2012-12-07 11:53:39 AM

Zappagirl: I live in a tiny patch of the East End that was untouched. At the end of our road is the site of the first V-1 bomb that fell on London. Not far from us in Bethnal Green was the site of the deadliest civilian incident in WWII - almost 200 people killed in a tube station in a stampede. The Brits suffered tremendously in WWII - I think we easily forget that since they weren't invaded by troops.


We don't forget. That's why every film or TV show ever made in Britain has been about the 2nd World War. For true!
 
2012-12-07 12:04:20 PM
Yea, well think of all that stimulus the blitz provided.
 
2012-12-07 12:26:49 PM
I just finished watching "World at War" over the last couple months, really fantastic WW2 documentary from BBC in the 70s. A paltry 26 hours long.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_World_at_War

Full of lovely footage and interviews that have basically been lost to the ravages of time by now. I found it quite interesting to hear some of the views on Hitler, USSR, Japan etc. just ~25 years removed instead of 80. Lots of still-living vets interviewed, some of whom even had WWI experience. Can't recommend enough to anyone with a love of history.

A couple episodes may be familiar on their own - "Genocide" is the episode covering the Holocaust, and I think it gets some play in classrooms and the like still. Really affecting stuff.
 
2012-12-07 12:31:28 PM
1.4 milliHomeless is a negligible number of people

/that guy
 
2012-12-07 12:43:10 PM

wjllope: 1.4 milliHomeless is a negligible number of people

/that guy


What is that, like a pinky finger? It would fit in a matchbox!
 
2012-12-07 01:25:51 PM
Someone say blitz?
 
2012-12-07 02:07:46 PM

Current Resident: Someone say blitz?


I have a piece of Zeppelin LZ31 brought down at Potter's Bar in 1916 that my grandfather took as a souvenir. He was an ARP warden in Watford in 1940, and I have a piece of JU88 he picked up then as well.

Got about a bit, he did.
 
2012-12-07 02:43:25 PM
Bombs over West Ham
 
2012-12-07 02:54:56 PM

Rusty Shackleford: I have a piece of Zeppelin LZ31 brought down at Potter's Bar in 1916 that my grandfather took as a souvenir. He was an ARP warden in Watford in 1940, and I have a piece of JU88 he picked up then as well.

Got about a bit, he did.


That's very cool.

My grandpa liberated a few souvenirs (Nazi medals, Officer's hat, a couple of pistols) on the way out of Europe at the end of the war. And while they're great and all, I'd love to have pieces of debris like you have.
 
2012-12-07 03:04:49 PM

Electromax: I just finished watching "World at War" over the last couple months, really fantastic WW2 documentary from BBC in the 70s. A paltry 26 hours long.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_World_at_War

Full of lovely footage and interviews that have basically been lost to the ravages of time by now. I found it quite interesting to hear some of the views on Hitler, USSR, Japan etc. just ~25 years removed instead of 80. Lots of still-living vets interviewed, some of whom even had WWI experience. Can't recommend enough to anyone with a love of history.

A couple episodes may be familiar on their own - "Genocide" is the episode covering the Holocaust, and I think it gets some play in classrooms and the like still. Really affecting stuff.


There are a lot of lies in that show. The Cold War was still going on and there were still secrets from the war that needed hiding.
 
2012-12-07 03:23:14 PM

Clash City Farker: Electromax: I just finished watching "World at War" over the last couple months, really fantastic WW2 documentary from BBC in the 70s. A paltry 26 hours long.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_World_at_War

Full of lovely footage and interviews that have basically been lost to the ravages of time by now. I found it quite interesting to hear some of the views on Hitler, USSR, Japan etc. just ~25 years removed instead of 80. Lots of still-living vets interviewed, some of whom even had WWI experience. Can't recommend enough to anyone with a love of history.

A couple episodes may be familiar on their own - "Genocide" is the episode covering the Holocaust, and I think it gets some play in classrooms and the like still. Really affecting stuff.

There are a lot of lies in that show. The Cold War was still going on and there were still secrets from the war that needed hiding.


Any examples/further reading? I'd be interested to learn more while it's fresh in my mind.
 
2012-12-07 03:26:49 PM
Holy shiat. I'm not sure which zoom level paints a creepier picture.
 
2012-12-07 03:30:23 PM

Electromax: Clash City Farker: Electromax: I just finished watching "World at War" over the last couple months, really fantastic WW2 documentary from BBC in the 70s. A paltry 26 hours long.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_World_at_War

Full of lovely footage and interviews that have basically been lost to the ravages of time by now. I found it quite interesting to hear some of the views on Hitler, USSR, Japan etc. just ~25 years removed instead of 80. Lots of still-living vets interviewed, some of whom even had WWI experience. Can't recommend enough to anyone with a love of history.

A couple episodes may be familiar on their own - "Genocide" is the episode covering the Holocaust, and I think it gets some play in classrooms and the like still. Really affecting stuff.

There are a lot of lies in that show. The Cold War was still going on and there were still secrets from the war that needed hiding.

Any examples/further reading? I'd be interested to learn more while it's fresh in my mind.


You should watch the episodes on Strategic Bombing, anything on spying and the Japanese rise in the Pacific.
 
2012-12-07 03:40:45 PM

Clash City Farker: Electromax: Clash City Farker: Electromax: I just finished watching "World at War" over the last couple months, really fantastic WW2 documentary from BBC in the 70s. A paltry 26 hours long.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_World_at_War

Full of lovely footage and interviews that have basically been lost to the ravages of time by now. I found it quite interesting to hear some of the views on Hitler, USSR, Japan etc. just ~25 years removed instead of 80. Lots of still-living vets interviewed, some of whom even had WWI experience. Can't recommend enough to anyone with a love of history.

A couple episodes may be familiar on their own - "Genocide" is the episode covering the Holocaust, and I think it gets some play in classrooms and the like still. Really affecting stuff.

There are a lot of lies in that show. The Cold War was still going on and there were still secrets from the war that needed hiding.

Any examples/further reading? I'd be interested to learn more while it's fresh in my mind.

You should watch the episodes on Strategic Bombing, anything on spying and the Japanese rise in the Pacific.


Well I've already watched them... do you just mean general "rose-tinted glasses" about Britain bombing Germany and underplaying civilian casualties/bombing? The episodes about Japan I thought were interesting but I'm not sure I've read enough to be able to pick out lies just by watching the episodes a second time without any additional input.

The Japan episodes I remember generally just covered some of the (alleged) political and cultural goings on that led up to the invasion of China and how the general public viewed things, a bit like the episodes that cover Hitler's rise through the German government.

I would definitely accept that there are lies/inaccuracies for various reasons but I was just curious if you were speaking from general knowledge or if you had read something in particular that discusses this. Maybe just stuff about post-WW2 propaganda in the west and how the victors wrote the history?
 
2012-12-07 03:45:21 PM
And the man at the back said "Everyone attack" and it turned into

www.chartstats.com
 
2012-12-07 04:02:25 PM

Electromax: Clash City Farker: Electromax: Clash City Farker: Electromax: I just finished watching "World at War" over the last couple months, really fantastic WW2 documentary from BBC in the 70s. A paltry 26 hours long.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_World_at_War

Full of lovely footage and interviews that have basically been lost to the ravages of time by now. I found it quite interesting to hear some of the views on Hitler, USSR, Japan etc. just ~25 years removed instead of 80. Lots of still-living vets interviewed, some of whom even had WWI experience. Can't recommend enough to anyone with a love of history.

A couple episodes may be familiar on their own - "Genocide" is the episode covering the Holocaust, and I think it gets some play in classrooms and the like still. Really affecting stuff.

There are a lot of lies in that show. The Cold War was still going on and there were still secrets from the war that needed hiding.

Any examples/further reading? I'd be interested to learn more while it's fresh in my mind.

You should watch the episodes on Strategic Bombing, anything on spying and the Japanese rise in the Pacific.

Well I've already watched them... do you just mean general "rose-tinted glasses" about Britain bombing Germany and underplaying civilian casualties/bombing? The episodes about Japan I thought were interesting but I'm not sure I've read enough to be able to pick out lies just by watching the episodes a second time without any additional input.

The Japan episodes I remember generally just covered some of the (alleged) political and cultural goings on that led up to the invasion of China and how the general public viewed things, a bit like the episodes that cover Hitler's rise through the German government.

I would definitely accept that there are lies/inaccuracies for various reasons but I was just curious if you were speaking from general knowledge or if you had read something in particular that discusses this. Maybe just stuff about post-WW2 propagand ...


In general yes. I saw an episode a few months back and I caught something glaring, but honetly I cant recall right now. I'm going to try and watch them again more carefully if I can catch them on TV.
 
2012-12-07 06:00:49 PM

dennysgod: Hey ho, let's go
Hey ho, let's go


SHOCK AND AWE
 
2012-12-07 06:25:54 PM

Electromax: I just finished watching "World at War" over the last couple months, really fantastic WW2 documentary from BBC in the 70s. A paltry 26 hours long.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_World_at_War

Full of lovely footage and interviews that have basically been lost to the ravages of time by now. I found it quite interesting to hear some of the views on Hitler, USSR, Japan etc. just ~25 years removed instead of 80. Lots of still-living vets interviewed, some of whom even had WWI experience. Can't recommend enough to anyone with a love of history.

A couple episodes may be familiar on their own - "Genocide" is the episode covering the Holocaust, and I think it gets some play in classrooms and the like still. Really affecting stuff.


I watched a lot of those over the years when I was a teenager (the local station ran them quite a bit), and it fueled my interest in WWII history (not just what happened after Dec. 7th, 1941, but the rather long run-up to the starts of both the Asian and European sides of the war, and the "shadow" war the US fought between Sep. 1st, 1939 and Dec. 7th, 1941 in support of Britain without actually engaging in trigger-pulling). That series could be both amazingly apolitical and blatantly jingoistic simultaneously, all without losing sight of telling the actual story of WWII (and that series also fueled my disgust and hatred for "revisionist" versions of history, where Hitler, Stalin, Roosevelt, Churchill, and Tojo all conspired together to kill millions to bring about a New World Order).
 
2012-12-07 06:57:40 PM
TheSwizz: Should have just nuked.

I'm sure they would have if they had made one first.
 
2012-12-07 08:01:12 PM

Electromax: I just finished watching "World at War" over the last couple months, really fantastic WW2 documentary from BBC in the 70s. A paltry 26 hours long.


It is a fantastic series (though as mentioned some stuff was still classified) and the BBC is a fantastic broadcaster but TWAW was made by and originally shown on ITV, the commercial rival to the BBC. BBC Worldwide do a lot of distribution for other producers so there may be TWAW DVDs with a BBC logo on them, but it was made by ITV.
 
2012-12-07 08:55:56 PM
And had someone not gotten distracted, Sea Lion would have made things just a little bit uglier.
 
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