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(YouTube)   These are the first steps Steven Sanchez has taken in seven years, and he's doing it in Berkeley Power Loader 0.2. (append dust metaphor here)   (youtube.com) divider line 37
    More: Spiffy, exoskeletons, UC Berkeley, miracles  
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5813 clicks; posted to Video » on 07 Dec 2012 at 12:06 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-07 12:01:39 AM
s11.postimage.org

So it begins.
 
2012-12-07 12:21:24 AM
Why is this called "Miracles of Nature"?
 
2012-12-07 12:21:26 AM
"UC Berkeley's latest medical exoskeleton system being developed by Professor Homayoon Kazerooni and his graduate students"

nice.
 
JRB
2012-12-07 12:28:24 AM

Arkanaut: Why is this called "Miracles of Nature"?


They keep mentioning something about the thingy's construction was "inspired by arthropods," but that must be covered in a separate segment (no pun intended).
 
2012-12-07 12:32:36 AM
I thought normally you create complex electronics in a dust-free environment.

THEY FAILED.
 
2012-12-07 12:54:31 AM
And so the Ministry of Silly Walks welcomes its newest member.

/Pretty awesome
 
2012-12-07 01:06:02 AM
That's pretty spiffy... till the battery dies.
 
2012-12-07 01:09:39 AM
I was involved (as a subject) in some very very early research that, I think,ultimately led to this back in the late 80's (direct measurement of neuromuscular activity in paralyzed patients) It's cool to see how far they've progressed. I wonder if it's significantly more comfortable than the bulky, cumbersome leg and body braces I wore as kid in the 70's. It has to be less strenuous.
 
2012-12-07 01:19:36 AM

wildsnowllama: That's pretty spiffy... till the battery dies.


... at which point Jeremy Clarkson will be there to mock him.

Shoulda bought a V-8.
 
2012-12-07 01:48:43 AM
i.imgur.com
The Mark II is still in development...

/obscure?
 
2012-12-07 02:01:11 AM

BlackKaiser: [i.imgur.com image 220x307]
The Mark II is still in development...

/obscure?


nopes
Link

/haven't watched that in years
 
2012-12-07 02:04:33 AM
If I were Hamster, I would have spent that entire narration thinking "that could have been me."

/nifty piece of kit
 
2012-12-07 02:09:26 AM
BlackKaiser: /obscure?

Puh lease, that's from the same era that brought us Viper, Hercules, Xena, Duckman and The Tick.

// M.A.N.T.I.S. was produced by the same folks who produced Hercules and Xena, good job.

// 1994 was a decent TV year
 
2012-12-07 02:30:54 AM
Wheelchair ramps are defeatist. Invest in exoskeleton development.
ReWalk

Also, Homayoon Kazerooni is the new Gene Masseth.
 
2012-12-07 02:36:38 AM

FraggleStickCar: "UC Berkeley's latest medical exoskeleton system being developed by Professor Homayoon Kazerooni and his graduate students"

nice.


Don't get your point.

Funny sounding foreign name? Or smart guy doing good?
 
2012-12-07 02:54:39 AM
I haven't watched MANTIS since its original TV run, when I was a kid. Was it as underrated as I remember or was it just a terrible show that deserved an early death?
 
2012-12-07 03:03:15 AM
That's pretty sweet.
 
2012-12-07 03:07:54 AM

Porous Horace: Wheelchair ramps are defeatist. Invest in exoskeleton development.
ReWalk

Also, Homayoon Kazerooni is the new Gene Masseth.


Well, they didn't used to be. Not back when being in a wheelchair meant that you either had to push it yourself using your own arms (result: MASSIVE GUNS, and pecs of steel) or have an attendant strong enough to push you (again, massive arms at your disposal, they're just connected to somebody who is already inclined to help you. Also, motivation to be thin, lest your pusher decide to give up on your fat ass.)

Then came the Hoveround and it s imitators.

/has a friend with a leg disability. She was okay when she had to use crutches or a hand wheelchair. Fifteen years ago, some well-meaning doctor got her hooked on having a Hoveround...now she's 350 lbs, unemployable, and has to be lifted in with something that bears a striking resemblance to an engine-block hoist.
//although, oddly, she's not Republican despite having many of the physical features found in the Tea Partiers. She knows that it's government handout programs keeping her alive...
 
2012-12-07 03:08:49 AM

Porous Horace: Wheelchair ramps are defeatist. Invest in exoskeleton development.
ReWalk

Also, Homayoon Kazerooni is the new Gene Masseth.


Years later, I'm still amazed that guy got that newspaper to print that as his name. What an oblivious reporter.
 
2012-12-07 05:54:13 AM
Two thoughts.

1:how long before the military weaponizes this? This has got to be the first step towards battle armor.

2: God help him the first time he tries to fly. That thing will be in pieces before security is done with it.
 
2012-12-07 06:50:30 AM
That'll teach you whippersnappers to stop doing them fancy BMX tricks.

/ get off my half-pipe
 
2012-12-07 07:42:50 AM

BigBooper: how long before the military weaponizes this?


About three years before yesterday.
Both Rathyon Sarcos and Lockheed have their own power armor prototypes in the works, with mostly impressive results.
dl.dropbox.com

Rathyon also plugged some arms onto a ditch witch with a similar control system.

dl.dropbox.com

Which means any mech last seen in a James Cameron movie can become a real thing once given the green light.

Oddly tho, I predict the military will probably be the biggest non-customer for the time being.
Their idea of infantry is having someone you can drop off in the wilderness for weeks at a time with no support, and robots require all kinds of maintenance. Convincing the brass that powered armor is a viable thing will take quite a bit of doing.

It would be a great help for loading cargo, but then we're talking about a multi-million dollar program to replace a five thousand dollar forklift powered by tears and suffering of pogs.
 
2012-12-07 07:45:00 AM

BigBooper: Two thoughts.

1:how long before the military weaponizes this? This has got to be the first step towards battle armor.

2: God help him the first time he tries to fly. That thing will be in pieces before security is done with it.


I realize that it's a wikipedia Link, but the US Army is using powered exoskeletons as a recruiting tool.

also there are videos out there of them loading up a grunt with 200 pounds

raytheon
lockheed martin
 
2012-12-07 08:01:55 AM
Sure it looks a little clumsy but you have to start somewhere. I think it is a great start and admire his determination and courage to even try it.

I am curious though, I wonder if there is any chance whatsoever of his body teaching itself to walk again just by going through the motions forced by that rig?

The reason I am thinking that is that is the therapy Christopher Reeve was doing that led so some partial movement before his death.
 
2012-12-07 08:04:41 AM
Great story, but I wish this kind of show didn't feel compelled to lather in an oppressive, relentless symphonic soundtrack that frequently comes close to drowning out the narrator. Guys, I'm not 5, and I don't have an IQ of 78. I can figure out on my own what my emotional response should be.
 
2012-12-07 08:22:26 AM

lc6529: I am curious though, I wonder if there is any chance whatsoever of his body teaching itself to walk again just by going through the motions forced by that rig?


From what I understand, the system is meant to be self balancing. So their arms are trying to keep up with the motions of the robot (like a legged segway).
The Lockheed and Raytheon systems required physical input, but Raytheon has mentioned that their skeleton is self supporting and could be driven autonomously (in theory). Meaning if they developed some other form of nerve input, a full paraplegic could use it.

Kibbler: I wish this kind of show didn't feel compelled to lather in an oppressive, relentless symphonic soundtrack that frequently comes close to drowning out the narrator.


May I suggest a musical improvement.

/Assuming you like Yoko Kanno.
 
2012-12-07 08:43:13 AM
More mobile than Mark Sanchez...
 
2012-12-07 09:22:22 AM
that was cool, great little part of the video was when he was standing there being interviewed and someone walked by and he looked over at head height and had this smile.
 
2012-12-07 09:36:37 AM
Is that Richard Hammond I hear?
 
2012-12-07 11:19:39 AM

lc6529: I am curious though, I wonder if there is any chance whatsoever of his body teaching itself to walk again just by going through the motions forced by that rig?


I was wondering that as well. So much is lost to atrophy of the limbs; it seems like this would at least keep the circulation flowing and perhaps that could lead to some nerve cell regeneration.

/internet degree in medicine
 
2012-12-07 11:25:34 AM

lc6529: I am curious though, I wonder if there is any chance whatsoever of his body teaching itself to walk again just by going through the motions forced by that rig?


Probably not, by the looks of it. Not in the "normal" sense. If they can get the controls on this thing to work off of nerve impulses it would be possible. But he would have to use nerves and muscles elsewhere (such as in the back, arms, etc). You'd be shocked at how quickly the human body would understand the correlation to the limb movements and start to adapt. So, yes, he could walk, but no, not with the damaged nerves. Of course results might be different for different people and injuries.

As to the "people look at me differently and don't see the person" thing, well, I don't think those bionic legs are helping with that. Just sayin'.
 
2012-12-07 12:32:22 PM
Yeah, I don't think this thing is being controlled by nerve impulses. It looks like he's just leaning forward, and the weight of his limbs gets the walking motion started and the servos take over from there.
 
2012-12-07 01:15:29 PM
This is great, very moving, but wouldn't it make sense to "throw everything at" repairing nerves?
 
2012-12-07 03:09:55 PM
I saw someone from NSCD (National Sports Center for the Disabled) using one of these (not this exact one, but a robotic assistive device for the lower extremities) at the park the other day... it was awesome... the only problem with it is that it did not make cool robot noises, it was almost totally silent. I got busted staring, but it was too cool not to stare at... we're just a few armor pieces from making robocops.
 
2012-12-07 03:13:43 PM

lc6529: Sure it looks a little clumsy but you have to start somewhere. I think it is a great start and admire his determination and courage to even try it.

I am curious though, I wonder if there is any chance whatsoever of his body teaching itself to walk again just by going through the motions forced by that rig?

The reason I am thinking that is that is the therapy Christopher Reeve was doing that led so some partial movement before his death.


A lot of the new rigs work by using twitches/movements in other muscle groups, so if the nerve itself is severed entirely, then there's no feedback getting to the brain for it to "learn" anything. That said, we're also making great strides in repairing damaged nerves and we're not too far off from being able to grown new nerves. Leaps and bounds are being made all the time in neurology... I'm looking forward to the day when some of todays worst neuro impairments are treated as easily as broken legs.
 
2012-12-07 03:39:04 PM

Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: I haven't watched MANTIS since its original TV run, when I was a kid. Was it as underrated as I remember or was it just a terrible show that deserved an early death?


It was OK, but the last episode had MANTIS killed by an invisible dinosaur. Take from that what you will.
 
2012-12-07 05:24:51 PM
images-booknode.com 

OK but can we please learn how to repair nerve cells now?
 
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