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(The Consumerist)   Choose your own adventure: You order one iPad as a gift. The big box store sends you five. What do you do with the extra iPads? Tag is for actual outcome   (consumerist.com) divider line 13
    More: Sappy, Choose Your Own Adventure, iPads, Best Buy, proof without words, internet research, gifts  
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17173 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Dec 2012 at 10:06 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-06 10:23:40 AM
5 votes:
The thought of giving iPads to people "in need" cracks me up, because there are zero people who need iPads.
2012-12-06 10:29:59 AM
2 votes:
I wonder if the other side of this story is that somewhere, someone who ordered 5 ipads got a box with one, and was charged for 5, and is going apeshiat with Best Buy.
2012-12-06 10:25:44 AM
2 votes:
Find an orphanage or similar facility that cares for teens 13 & up without parents or in situations where they can't live with their parents (they're druggies or locked up or similar). These kids get no breaks. They don't get adopted. They don't get hugged or cuddled. They don't get surprises, and nobody donates toys they'd be interested in. They don't get treated like their special, and they feel like forgotten refuse. They get the basics and have being completely on their own to look forward to once they turn 18.

Find a place that cares for these kids, and get them to point you to 4 smart, fairly together teens that would each really appreciate an iPad. Feel good about yourself for the rest of the holiday season.

Seriously; we went shopping for a bunch of stuff to send to a place like this and their self-written Christmas lists were the saddest things ever. Jeans. School supplies. Books. New, non-charity clothes. Something like that would knock their socks off.
2012-12-06 10:16:00 AM
2 votes:
Well the Consumerist should know that the proposition that "anything shipped to your home is yours" is not actually a legal doctrine. While it is true that under the rules of contract/restitution, you are under no obligation to pay for the mistakenly sent items - which is to prevent old scams wherein someone would send you, say, a tie in the mail and then charge you $50 - if best buy or whomever asked that you sent the merch back, you are under a legal obligation to do so (unless you reasonably changed position such that the disgorgement would work harm upon you - think accidentally spending money mistakenly placed in your bank account because you legitimately believed it was a bonus or some such). Now they have to pay for the shipping and all - but you cant just reply "nope, mine now"

/Fun fact: except for abandoned goods and the law of salvage in admiralty - finders keepers is also not a valid doctrine.
2012-12-06 10:08:25 AM
2 votes:
It saddens me that someone doing the right thing is:

a) treated like an unparalleled hero OR

b) mocked for her "stupidity"
2012-12-06 01:33:35 PM
1 votes:

Priapetic: Theaetetus: UCC § 2-601

All correct in regards to transactions in goods between commercial entities, but don't forget to check out § 2-102, to wit:

"nor does this Article impair or repeal any statute regulating sales to consumers, farmers or other specified classes of buyers."

So, where there are different rules regarding retail sales (which there are), UCC doesn't impair.


The UCC most assuredly applies to consumers. The point of 2-102 is that it doesn't impair or repeal other consumer protection statutes (such as MGL 93A here in Mass).

The postal statute mentioned above doesn't apply, because this wasn't an unsolicited order... it was a non-conforming order. Hence, it doesn't preempt the UCC and the provisions I mentioned are still active.
2012-12-06 11:38:04 AM
1 votes:
Well, I'm in need of money. So if this happened, I'd try to return it, but if they let me keep them, I just return them to the nearest cooperative store, or failing that, sell them at a discount.
2012-12-06 11:18:58 AM
1 votes:
Some one did a full-case pick instead of an each pick at fulfillment. Usually, the carton ID and shipping ID are matched prior to hitting the shipping sorter. My last company did this because an eCom facility we did had an issue with valid shipping labels being applied to wrong carton IDs. We added a scan tunnel after print & apply to error these cartons out.

Best Buy's logistics be whack.
2012-12-06 10:59:33 AM
1 votes:
When Madden 2008 (that last version for pc!) dropped down to $10, I used a $5 reward from my Best Buy credit card to buy 1 copy.

They sent me 2 in 2 different packages but I was only charged for 1.


I CAN TOTALLY RELATE TO THIS STORY.
2012-12-06 10:46:56 AM
1 votes:
It's not really an ethical dilemma if, you know, you actually have ethics. The company made a mistake. Send them back and stop trying to get over.
2012-12-06 10:35:46 AM
1 votes:

Theaetetus: Teiritzamna: Well the Consumerist should know that the proposition that "anything shipped to your home is yours" is not actually a legal doctrine.

Yeah, saw that line and facepalmed. At least it turned out well.


Well, the Federal Trade Commission seems to think otherwise, and gives out that advice on their website: Link
2012-12-06 10:17:04 AM
1 votes:

stonelotus: If You Didn't Order It, You Don't Have To Pay For It


There is, however, a distinction between purposefully sent items and mistakes.
2012-12-06 10:13:11 AM
1 votes:
That's a no-brainer...

www.mikehaywardcollection.com
 
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