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(KWWL Waterloo)   Old and busted: $6 a gallon gas. New hotness: $6 a gallon milk   (kwwl.com ) divider line
    More: Scary, safety nets, Iowa, supply management  
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5819 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Dec 2012 at 1:33 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



144 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2012-12-05 11:50:10 PM  
GODDAMMIT 0BAMA
 
2012-12-05 11:55:44 PM  
Meh... I get crappy mileage on milk, anyway
 
2012-12-05 11:57:37 PM  
i43.photobucket.com
 
2012-12-06 12:12:45 AM  
My first fill up cost me 27 cents a gallon, plus I got a 12 ounce drinking glass and a free fill-up of washer fluid.

Just kidding, we didn't know what washer fluid was back then.
 
2012-12-06 12:20:12 AM  
Bring on the glorious free market assrape, just the way unregulated free market should work.
 
2012-12-06 01:16:45 AM  
and these same farmers are the ones who hang those big ass signs on the side of th road telling everyone Obama is a Muslim who wants to destroy america with socialism.
 
2012-12-06 01:18:36 AM  

GAT_00: Bring on the glorious free market assrape, just the way unregulated free market should work.


OK, we'll just need to calibrate your sphincter for a moment.

RELAX.

 
2012-12-06 01:38:44 AM  
1970's a gallon of gas .36 a gallon of milk $1.15

Damn Nixon!
 
2012-12-06 01:40:07 AM  
$6 milk because we're putting the corn in the gas tanks instead of the cow.

Back to ye olde production possibility frontier.
 
2012-12-06 01:41:10 AM  
Pshaw, $6.00? Try $12.00 on for size, and find out what a monopoly can do for you. And then get a wife and kid that drink milk like it's going out of style. Then you can complain!
 
2012-12-06 01:43:53 AM  
We need MORE COWS. Send in the cows.
 
2012-12-06 01:44:24 AM  

log_jammin: and these same farmers are the ones who hang those big ass signs on the side of th road telling everyone Obama is a Muslim who wants to destroy america with socialism.


Yeah I giggled.

We have the same problems in Oz, we keep forgetting that we have to eat - digging up minerals is all nice and fine to buy the things that make life comfortable - but its food production that keeps us alive.

Some of our best food growing areas happen to also be on top of a lot of minerals (mostly coal or gas) and in our current corporate $ driven environment you can guess which industry loses.
 
2012-12-06 01:45:48 AM  
For a longtime, we have had a government mandated price floor on milk that set the price at an artificially high minimum. This is just fixing that.
 
2012-12-06 01:46:54 AM  
Six bucks for a gallon of plain old milk?

I hate to think what the low-pus stuff might cost.
 
2012-12-06 01:47:43 AM  
Milk was free when Hussein Dumbass took office.
 
2012-12-06 01:48:08 AM  
Funny, isn't it? How the idea of "starving the beast" always seems so bootstrappy and fun, until you realize that also means not paving the street *you* live on.
 
2012-12-06 01:49:12 AM  
Considering so many women are out of work, how about we harvest their breast milk?
 
2012-12-06 01:49:39 AM  

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Milk was free when Hussein Dumbass took office.


I have no idea why this made me crack up. Teary eyed even.
 
2012-12-06 01:51:51 AM  
I just typed in "14.33 SEK per liter in USD per gallon" and got $8.22 as the result...

Living in Sweden makes these kind of threads a bit bizarre to read. Milk's at about $4.77/gallon here.
 
2012-12-06 01:51:57 AM  

EkimProx: Considering so many women are out of work, how about we harvest their breast milk?


next time just fart and hope for a laugh.
 
2012-12-06 01:52:35 AM  
fark id be happy to pay $6 for a gallon of milk. The average price here is a couple pennies below $7. About $15 at 7-11 ....

Got to love living in the north.
/ starting wages in town is about $20 per hour
/ a 2000 sq ft house is about $180k
 
2012-12-06 01:54:31 AM  

SumoJeb: fark id be happy to pay $6 for a gallon of milk. The average price here is a couple pennies below $7. About $15 at 7-11 ....

Got to love living in the north.
/ starting wages in town is about $20 per hour
/ a 2000 sq ft house is about $180k


Damn that is sweet and I thought I lived in the lucky country.
 
2012-12-06 01:57:43 AM  
I'm paying $5.09/gal. Funny that this was greenlighted because I have been wondering what the rest of America is paying. I have been going through a gallon a day lately.
 
2012-12-06 01:59:16 AM  
Stop giving welfare to those lazy, shiftless urban folks and "illegals"!!!
/now where are my farming subsidies!!
 
2012-12-06 02:00:09 AM  
also, dairy farming sort of sucks but does give you something to do twice a day, every day, no weekends...no vacations...no snow days...nope. twice a day, every day.

moo

fat chick thread?

bronanthebarbarian.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-12-06 02:00:43 AM  
These farmers are complaining about price supports that keep milk prices higher than they would be in a free market. They're scaring people. The price of milk should go down without the price supports. That's what they're afraid of.
 
2012-12-06 02:01:17 AM  

Walosi: I'm paying $5.09/gal. Funny that this was greenlighted because I have been wondering what the rest of America is paying. I have been going through a gallon a day lately.


Geeze. Sometimes I hate living where I do, other times it's not quite unbearable. This is one of those rare moments.

2.99/ga gas
3.39/ga milk
 
2012-12-06 02:06:11 AM  
I been paying $4 for 1/2 gallon for a long while now.

$6 for a gallon would be cheap for me.
 
2012-12-06 02:06:39 AM  
Hmm... at a certain point, people might be driven to buy soy milk instead.
 
2012-12-06 02:07:17 AM  
Just pump the cows full of rBGH and you'll have so much milk the price can't help but go down.
 
2012-12-06 02:08:59 AM  
Link

Study it out!
 
2012-12-06 02:10:21 AM  

Dadoody: I been paying $4 for 1/2 gallon for a long while now.

$6 for a gallon would be cheap for me.


Same, and a 1/2 gallon lasts me over a month.
 
2012-12-06 02:11:38 AM  

SumoJeb: fark id be happy to pay $6 for a gallon of milk. The average price here is a couple pennies below $7. About $15 at 7-11 ....

Got to love living in the north.
/ starting wages in town is about $20 per hour
/ a 2000 sq ft house is about $180k


Add about $600k to the home price and it sounds about like here in Honolulu.
 
2012-12-06 02:11:47 AM  


He said he's in favor of market forces driving the prices of milk, but dairy farmers have, for decades, had the safety net of federal programs when milk prices plummeted. Until now

trinities.org

 
2012-12-06 02:11:51 AM  

Mr. Carpenter: 2.99/ga gas
3.39/ga milk


gas today 3.29
milk 3.98
 
2012-12-06 02:12:22 AM  
Fark it. That shiat is poison anyway. Dairy is more or less dietary shiat.
 
ecl
2012-12-06 02:13:17 AM  

Omahawg: also, dairy farming sort of sucks but does give you something to do twice a day, every day, no weekends...no vacations...no snow days...nope. twice a day, every day.

moo

fat chick thread?

[bronanthebarbarian.files.wordpress.com image 407x459]


WHERE'S THE MILK!?
 
2012-12-06 02:21:24 AM  

Omahawg: also, dairy farming sort of sucks but does give you something to do twice a day, every day, no weekends...no vacations...no snow days...nope. twice a day, every day.

moo

fat chick thread?

[bronanthebarbarian.files.wordpress.com image 407x459]


Now that I can turn into gas, but it will not fly.
 
2012-12-06 02:22:20 AM  
As a Libertarian who is not an outrageous free-marketer, why the hell do we need to constantly subsidize, price-fix, and choose winners in food markets by pouring government funds into some programs (but not others) at taxpayer expense? We are very fortunate in the US to have diverse staple sources - corn, wheat, soybeans, and even rice and potatoes - so people can easily switch staples during an off cycle. Cow's milk is not really a necessity and the price could rise and fall significantly without impacting anyone greatly (yes, I know the farmers complain when the prices fall because revenues decline, but what's new?). If we stop subsidizing corn ethanol, we get better quality gasoline and cheaper food prices across the board, as well as better use of farmland and less govt expenditure on ethanol programs. The "free market" can't do everything, but it is a great system for managing prices and supplies when people can choose to buy less or eat differently. Perhaps part of the problem is that we are operating as if it is still World War II and we have to delicately manage every aspect of food supply or we will all starve.
 
2012-12-06 02:23:03 AM  
Water is $6 gallon... don't know what the big fuss is.
 
2012-12-06 02:23:59 AM  
that was crude and insensitive and posted in a moment of weakness

i'm sorry.
 
2012-12-06 02:24:48 AM  

BoxOfBees: As a Libertarian who is not an outrageous free-marketer, why the hell do we need to constantly subsidize, price-fix, and choose winners in food markets by pouring government funds into some programs (but not others) at taxpayer expense? We are very fortunate in the US to have diverse staple sources - corn, wheat, soybeans, and even rice and potatoes - so people can easily switch staples during an off cycle. Cow's milk is not really a necessity and the price could rise and fall significantly without impacting anyone greatly (yes, I know the farmers complain when the prices fall because revenues decline, but what's new?). If we stop subsidizing corn ethanol, we get better quality gasoline and cheaper food prices across the board, as well as better use of farmland and less govt expenditure on ethanol programs. The "free market" can't do everything, but it is a great system for managing prices and supplies when people can choose to buy less or eat differently. Perhaps part of the problem is that we are operating as if it is still World War II and we have to delicately manage every aspect of food supply or we will all starve.


Yes to your last 15 words.

The rest LOL.
 
2012-12-06 02:25:26 AM  

What_Would_Jimi_Do: Mr. Carpenter: 2.99/ga gas
3.39/ga milk

gas today 3.29
milk 3.98


we are paying 3.15 for gas and the milk usually runs around 4.00. Walmart the "home of low prices" is actually the highest in town. We have a shoppers card at the Walgreens and CVS. They have alternating sales and we can usually get the milk on sale for under 3.00/gallon. We have a shoppers card at a Homeland and their new program we can buy so much in groceries and it activates saving in gas for our car. The other day when they scanned it, we ended up saving .30 cents/gallon and ended up paying well under the average for the area.
 
2012-12-06 02:25:56 AM  
www.grocerycouponnetwork.com

Problem?
 
2012-12-06 02:26:16 AM  
$1.99 a quart here, but I usually only buy 2 of them a month tops for cooking. I think that the gallon price is about $5.50 or so.
 
2012-12-06 02:29:43 AM  
I dunno. I don't drink milk.

Of course, I don't drink gasoline, either; so I can't really say which is a bigger ripoff.
 
2012-12-06 02:31:13 AM  

nmemkha: [www.grocerycouponnetwork.com image 270x224]

Problem?


I prefer 8th Continent, myself. Nothing against milk in itself, but I get neurotic about all the hormones that are pumped into it. I try to avoid most beef for the same reason.
 
2012-12-06 02:31:39 AM  
Gallon gas is $3.21
Gallon of milk yesterday $3.49 today $3.59

I have 4 kids too.. ugh, second job time.
 
2012-12-06 02:33:22 AM  
I was promised free stuff from the government by voting for Obama. Where's my free gas and milk at?
 
2012-12-06 02:33:59 AM  

GAT_00: Bring on the glorious free market assrape, just the way unregulated free market should work.


Sarcasm? If not, proof (once more) that you seldom have any idea what you are talking about. Economics isn't simple. The fact of the matter is that we have a mixed economy, and the milk industry is currently front-loaded with all sorts of regulations that tend to drive up the price of operations. An important one, alluded to in the article, is the price of feed grain. Hmmmmm.... I wonder what federal program(s) could be causing the price of grain to go through the roof? Something something (cough cough ethanol cough cough) something something.....
 
2012-12-06 02:34:04 AM  
milk is optional. sometimes gasoline is not.
 
2012-12-06 02:35:20 AM  

lokis_mentor: Gallon gas is $3.21
Gallon of milk yesterday $3.49 today $3.59

I have 4 kids too.. ugh, second job time.


Or, y'know, switch to another source of calcium. Milk is repugnant. Tastes like rot after you drink it.
 
2012-12-06 02:35:50 AM  

7th Son of a 7th Son: a 1/2 gallon lasts me over a month.


What the fark kind of lumpy green milk do you drink?
 
2012-12-06 02:36:49 AM  
LOL! Like I've said before: food riots by 2016-2017. Chickens coming home to roost. OPM eventually runs out, suckers.
 
2012-12-06 02:39:25 AM  
So... how many people are going to show up on my lawn with a pitchfork and torch... when I tell you Wegmans charges $1.99/gallon of fat free, I think it's under $2.50 even for 2%. Not sure for Whole milk.

Also the dairy farmers in western/southern NY have been biatching about the artificially LOW milk prices for like a decade. I don't blame them, considering how hard that work is, but it's just odd to me how big the difference is.

/paid $3.95 for 89 octane tonight, and that was on 'gas sale' day...
 
2012-12-06 02:39:42 AM  
Move to Syria then
 
2012-12-06 02:41:18 AM  
not you, tuna, the other one
 
2012-12-06 02:43:32 AM  

EkimProx: Considering so many women are out of work, how about we harvest their breast milk?


Yes please.
 
2012-12-06 02:44:46 AM  
A little over $3/gallon here in the midwest. I guess living in cow country has a few advantages.
 
2012-12-06 02:44:50 AM  

ladyfortuna: So... how many people are going to show up on my lawn with a pitchfork and torch... when I tell you Wegmans charges $1.99/gallon of fat free, I think it's under $2.50 even for 2%. Not sure for Whole milk.

Also the dairy farmers in western/southern NY have been biatching about the artificially LOW milk prices for like a decade. I don't blame them, considering how hard that work is, but it's just odd to me how big the difference is.

/paid $3.95 for 89 octane tonight, and that was on 'gas sale' day...


I miss the Meijer/Kroger Milk wars of the mid 90's. 1.50 a gallon.

/Bout 2.89 here now. 3.39 for 89 octane gas.
 
2012-12-06 02:46:22 AM  

lokis_mentor: Gallon gas is $3.21
Gallon of milk yesterday $3.49 today $3.59

I have 4 kids too.. ugh, second job time.


Or you could not drink milk. Kids don't need it after like age 12.
 
2012-12-06 02:46:43 AM  
Atomic Spunk

SumoJeb: fark id be happy to pay $6 for a gallon of milk. The average price here is a couple pennies below $7. About $15 at 7-11 ....

Got to love living in the north. / starting wages in town is about $20 per hour / a 2000 sq ft house is about $180k

Add about $600k to the home price and it sounds about like here in Honolulu


It hasn't been warmer than -15'c. Since September here.... Nothing like Honolulu ..... sigh
 
2012-12-06 02:48:07 AM  

SumoJeb: Atomic Spunk

SumoJeb: fark id be happy to pay $6 for a gallon of milk. The average price here is a couple pennies below $7. About $15 at 7-11 ....

Got to love living in the north. / starting wages in town is about $20 per hour / a 2000 sq ft house is about $180k

Add about $600k to the home price and it sounds about like here in Honolulu


It hasn't been warmer than -15'c. Since September here.... Nothing like Honolulu ..... sigh


Ah that was the catch :D
 
2012-12-06 02:49:06 AM  

BoxOfBees: As a Libertarian who is not an outrageous free-marketer, why the hell do we need to constantly subsidize, price-fix, and choose winners in food markets by pouring government funds into some programs (but not others) at taxpayer expense? We are very fortunate in the US to have diverse staple sources - corn, wheat, soybeans, and even rice and potatoes - so people can easily switch staples during an off cycle. Cow's milk is not really a necessity and the price could rise and fall significantly without impacting anyone greatly (yes, I know the farmers complain when the prices fall because revenues decline, but what's new?). If we stop subsidizing corn ethanol, we get better quality gasoline and cheaper food prices across the board, as well as better use of farmland and less govt expenditure on ethanol programs. The "free market" can't do everything, but it is a great system for managing prices and supplies when people can choose to buy less or eat differently. Perhaps part of the problem is that we are operating as if it is still World War II and we have to delicately manage every aspect of food supply or we will all starve.


you're seriously asking why a stable food supply is a good thing?
 
2012-12-06 02:52:06 AM  

doglover: Or, y'know, switch to another source of calcium. Milk is repugnant. Tastes like rot after you drink it.


Gyrfalcon: Or you could not drink milk. Kids don't need it after like age 12.

All my kids are still in the 2-12 range. So milk is still the cheaper alternative for the kids. I already stuff them with Cheese, broccoli, kale and the like to cut back on calcium from milk.
 
2012-12-06 02:53:17 AM  
North end of Chicago - gas is $3.65, milk is $2.89. Seeing as I go through about 12 gallons of gas per one gallon of milk, I'd like to switch places with a lot of people in this thread.
 
2012-12-06 03:00:22 AM  

Gyrfalcon: Or you could not drink milk. Kids don't need it after like age 12.


Milk is used for a lot of other things than just drinking it. Cheese, butter, baking, some sauces and so on all use milk.
 
2012-12-06 03:00:51 AM  
"A dairy industry without a farm bill could lead to much higher milk prices in the US."

because, you know, what farm bills do is convince farmers and agribusiness to work for less money.

I have absolutely no problem with $6/gallon milk if it means no subsidies. We'll end up better for it in the long term.

I also have no problem with $10 or even $20 gallons of gas if it means no subsidies via the defense industry. Heck, I pay almost $10 per gallon right now anyway (UK resident) and even so my total petrol bill is what - $3000-$4000 a year? Not going to kill me, and those are the kind of prices that force people to un-sprawl and to think about c0mmunist public transport infrastructure.
 
2012-12-06 03:03:39 AM  
The problem in dairy farming, as with so many other aspects of farming, is that the farmer has no control of costs or prices. Dairy farmers do not set prices - they get paid for their milk what their consumers decide to pay. Dairy farmers do not get to set prices for feed - they have to pay what market forces decide they should pay. Unlike a factory, you can't simply shut off or turn on a dairy farm. After a cow freshens, she must be milked twice a day or she will stop producing milk (and given the high-producing nature of today's milk cows, she may well die if milking suddenly stops). If you decide you want to start milking and get a heifer calf today, it takes about 2 years until she starts milking - even if you have a cow ready to breed, it's about 40 weeks gestation until she drops a calf and starts producing milk.

Once you have a cow producing milk, you don't just sidle up with a bucket and a milking stool and start pulling teats. You need to have a licensed milking facility along with proper permits and all of the inspected and approved milk handling equipment to make sure the milk is safe and held at the right temperature until the bulk truck comes to pick it up and transport it to the processing plant. All of this represents a significant investment for the dairy farmer.

So, dairy farmers have no control over prices; no control over costs. Society as a whole deems dairy products to be necessary (there is no substitute for real cheese on anything from pizza to the pecan-encrusted, phyllo dough-wrapped Brie). For better or worse, the government stepped in to support dairy farmers from going bankrupt. Just like any other government program (or like heroin) dairy price supports are addictive. Market players like dairy processing plants, cheese plants, dried milk plants, etc. are well aware of this and bid the price of milk accordingly - if their profits are a bit low and their demand is a bit soft, they just drop the price of their raw material (milk), knowing that the government will make up the difference to the farmer. Dairy equipment manufacturer raises prices, impelement manufacturer raises prices, price of corn, SBOM, silage, hay, whatever goes up - dairy farmers need it; pay whatever is required to keep operating and look to the government to make up the difference because they have no control over costs.

It is a terribly complex web. I am not in favor of any subsidies but the government has so intruded into the farming game that any changes will need to be gradual and will need to prod consumers and suppliers to the ag industries to bear a larger part of the burden than they have historically been willing to do.
 
2012-12-06 03:14:22 AM  

Omahawg: also, dairy farming sort of sucks but does give you something to do twice a day, every day, no weekends...no vacations...no snow days...nope. twice a day, every day.

moo

fat chick thread?

[bronanthebarbarian.files.wordpress.com image 407x459]


She's cute. Bet she'd give good head.

But seriously, GOOD! The farm subsidies have screwed up the free market, badly. There's way too much thought going into agricultural prices. I was dating into a farm family for a few years, and regional/national prices for various crops were stupidly insane, as was the measurement. They had convoys of trucks going from KS to NE just to save $20/load after fuel prices and payroll. Net profit per year after payroll/yearly expenses/loan repayments: $180-$400. For a 500 acre farm, minus non-farming utilites, such as the house and regular household expenses.

If I had any say, it would be dollar/pound, not bushel. Bushel is dependent on volume, which can vary based on water content. $7.5375123 per bushel of corn (which is 56 for shelled, 70 for ears) is crap.

Say I produce 100 tons of regular on-ear corn. This doesn't change. I should be able to sell to everyone at market price. If they want to let it sit and evaporate water-weight, cook it, de-ear it, freeze it, etc. for feedstock vs. human consumable stock, that's their business on a separate market not pertaining to national prices.
 
2012-12-06 03:17:29 AM  
Oh sure, but inflation is completely in check.
 
2012-12-06 03:19:53 AM  
Mr. Right - the problem for farmers is years like this one ending very soon. The USDA deemed 2012 the worst year for droughts and other severe weather events on record for the US. I personally drove through a good chunk of the Midwest (IN, OH) in late July and was floored by the volume of corn crops that were utterly worthless in terms of actual feed/food use. I saw here on Fark how it was even worse the farther west one looked.

The government may have created a vast agricultural web, but as I understand it one of the main reasons it is in place is to try and prevent another real Great Depression where thousands (millions?) of acres are abandoned by the farmers when they can no longer grow crops or raise livestock on them. I'm curious what the numbers will be for this year in terms of farmers claiming crop insurance.

In other words, as much as we love to hate yet another government agency system, it's intended to ease the burden in the hard years.
 
2012-12-06 03:25:35 AM  
So the farmers are finally allowed to charge a fair market price. Good.
 
2012-12-06 03:30:42 AM  
My area milk has stayed fairly stable at $2.50 to $3.00 a gal. However gas was actually $2.99!
 
2012-12-06 03:47:03 AM  
I consume about 8 l worth of milk in my diet every week. Now, For me to get to work and back, in one week, I consume about 98.43768 l of fuel.... if it was up to me, I'd gladly pay double for my milk, if I could halve the price on my fuel... in fact, the total spent on personal consumables, IE. food, beer etc. is only about 12.54% of what I need to spend on fuel, to make it through a month. pathetic if you think about it, actually.
 
2012-12-06 03:54:07 AM  
Who's paying $6 for gas? I'm still under $4 and taxed up the ass
 
2012-12-06 03:55:06 AM  
p...p...p...peak milk!!!!11!
 
2012-12-06 04:02:11 AM  
Forced ethanol consumption and a rapid devaluing of the dollar. What could possibly go wrong?
 
2012-12-06 04:10:48 AM  

FurbyGoneFubar: I just typed in "14.33 SEK per liter in USD per gallon" in Google and got $8.22 as the result...


www.google.co.uk16 (Chinese yuan per litre) = 11.6836016 U.S. dollars per Imperial gallon

At least that's what you pay around here if you want the stuff that's not laced with melamine or [insert chemical adulterant of the week here]. So yeah. Cry me a river of milk about $6/gallon milk.

/in other news, Google is pretty awesome
 
2012-12-06 04:12:21 AM  
Once upon a mid-day sunny, while I savored Nuts 'N Honey,
With my Tuscan Whole Milk, 1 gal, 128 fl. oz., I swore
As I went on with my lapping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at the icebox door.
'Bad condensor, that,' I muttered, 'vibrating the icebox door -
Only this, and nothing more.'

Not to sound like a complainer, but, in an inept half-gainer,
I provoked my bowl to tip and spill its contents on the floor.
Stupefied, I came to muddle over that increasing puddle,
Burgeoning deluge of that which I at present do adore -
Snowy Tuscan wholesomeness exclusively produced offshore -
Purg'ed here for evermore.

And the pool so white and silky, filled me with a sense of milky
Ardor of the type fantastic of a loss not known before,
So that now, to still the throbbing of my heart, while gently sobbing,
I retreated, heading straightway for the tempting icebox door -
Heedless of that pitter-patter tapping at the icebox door -
I resolved to have some more.

Presently my soul grew stronger; hesitating then no longer,
'This,' said I, 'requires an extra dram of milk, my favorite pour.'
To the icebox I aspired, motivated to admire
How its avocado pigment complemented my decor.
Then I grasped its woodgrain handle - here I opened wide the door; -
Darkness there, and nothing more.

Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing,
Doubting, dreaming dreams of Tuscans I had known before
But the light inside was broken, and the darkness gave no token,
And the only words there spoken were my whispered words, 'No more!'
Coke and beer, some ketchup I set eyes on, and an apple core -
Merely this and nothing more.

Back toward the table turning, all my soul within me burning,
Soon again I heard a tapping somewhat louder than before.
'Surely,' said I, 'surely that is something at my window lattice;
Let me see then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore -
Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore; -
'Tis the wind and nothing more!'

From the window came a stirring, then, with an incessant purring,
Inside stepped a kitten; mannerlessly did she me ignore.
Not the least obeisance made she; not a minute stopped or stayed she;
But, with mien of lord or lady, withdrew to my dining floor -
Pounced upon the pool of Tuscan spreading o'er my dining floor -
Licked, and lapped, and supped some more.

Then this tiny cat beguiling my sad fancy into smiling,
By the grand enthusiasm of the countenance she wore,
Toward the mess she showed no pity, 'til I said, 'Well, hello, kitty!'
Sought she me with pretty eyes that seemed to open some rapport.
So I pleaded, 'Tell me, tell me what it is that you implore!'
Quoth the kitten, 'Six farking dollars?!?'
 
2012-12-06 04:14:16 AM  

Omahawg: that was crude and insensitive and posted in a moment of weakness

i'm sorry.


Apology accepted.

Got any more?
 
2012-12-06 04:24:35 AM  

nmemkha: Problem?


Yes. Silk is disgusting.
 
2012-12-06 04:29:04 AM  

lokis_mentor: doglover: Or, y'know, switch to another source of calcium. Milk is repugnant. Tastes like rot after you drink it.

Gyrfalcon: Or you could not drink milk. Kids don't need it after like age 12.

All my kids are still in the 2-12 range. So milk is still the cheaper alternative for the kids. I already stuff them with Cheese, broccoli, kale and the like to cut back on calcium from milk.


Oh, well. Have you considered buying a cow? In a few years, you'll need to keep an ox roasting in the back yard to keep them fed anyway, so you may as well start planning ahead.
 
2012-12-06 04:48:33 AM  
what about almond milk? it's just like regular milk. who cares if it doesn't have protein. if ur eating Kashi it's got just as much protein as an egg!

i.ytimg.com
 
2012-12-06 04:51:33 AM  

Relatively Obscure: nmemkha: Problem?

Yes. Silk is disgusting.


It's like diet soda - you get used to it. The watery consistency no longer bothers me. I've gone from drinking nothing but whole milk as a kid, 2% in college, skim afterward and now almond milk.
 
2012-12-06 04:57:38 AM  
Gas is 1.30 a litre here. Forgot to add that..... And only if the stations have gas to sell.
 
2012-12-06 05:07:29 AM  

log_jammin: BoxOfBees: As a Libertarian who is not an outrageous free-marketer, why the hell do we need to constantly subsidize, price-fix, and choose winners in food markets by pouring government funds into some programs (but not others) at taxpayer expense? We are very fortunate in the US to have diverse staple sources - corn, wheat, soybeans, and even rice and potatoes - so people can easily switch staples during an off cycle. Cow's milk is not really a necessity and the price could rise and fall significantly without impacting anyone greatly (yes, I know the farmers complain when the prices fall because revenues decline, but what's new?). If we stop subsidizing corn ethanol, we get better quality gasoline and cheaper food prices across the board, as well as better use of farmland and less govt expenditure on ethanol programs. The "free market" can't do everything, but it is a great system for managing prices and supplies when people can choose to buy less or eat differently. Perhaps part of the problem is that we are operating as if it is still World War II and we have to delicately manage every aspect of food supply or we will all starve.

you're seriously asking why a stable food supply is a good thing?


because people are dumb and forget the 'good old days' when farmers burned their corn for heat all winter 'cause it wasn't worth it to transport and sell while there were people starving in the cities.

hell, even Hoover tried to do something, anything, to stop it (which didn't work). The Ag Adjustment Act mostly has.

farm everything possible? prices will drop so much you'll go bankrupt, corporations buy up all the land, and then you'll see how much you can gouge out of the american consumer for everything we generally take for granted.

agricultural subsidies and price supports really are a good thing. as are wic and food stamps ('cause demand)

all those free-market buffoons? yeah....I'm sure they think their food magically appears out of a can or something.

and the drought has been so bad out here that your hamburger, chicken, and pork chops are going to go sky high. no, don't blame the lack of pink slime, blame the weather and no feed, jackass. no, the corn you turn into ethanol, feed the pigs, and eat on the cob aren't the same.

also blame monsanto, adm, pioneer, and con-agra just because someone should put some heat on those evil monstrosities.

lastly,

www.yensa.com
 
2012-12-06 05:12:32 AM  
Give it another week, and I expect gasoline in my neighbor hood to be in the $2.999 range. It's already down to $3.049 for 85 octane at some stations. And milk was $2 last time I was at the store, so I bought 2 gallons. Now I suppose if you were buying free-range, hormone-free, vegan-cow, more-esoteric-than-thou milk, you could easily spend $6 per gallon.

It's nice to see subsidies start go away. Now if we could just get the sweetener market unscrewed from federal machinations and quit farking every poor cane farmer in Central and South America, then we would have made some real progress.
 
2012-12-06 05:22:19 AM  

Omahawg: lastly,


oh my lord....
 
2012-12-06 05:45:12 AM  

BoxOfBees: The "free market" can't do everything, but it is a great system for managing prices and supplies when people can choose to buy less or eat differently. Perhaps part of the problem is that we are operating as if it is still World War II and we have to delicately manage every aspect of food supply or we will all starve.


Actually, the federal government didn't start meddling in markets for meddling's sake until after WWII around 1948. Food rationing during the war was just a propaganda scheme to make people at home feel like they were contributing. There was plenty of food. The logistics of shipping it to Europe was the bottleneck.


brobinson2001: If I had any say, it would be dollar/pound, not bushel. Bushel is dependent on volume, which can vary based on water content.
...
Say I produce 100 tons of regular on-ear corn. This doesn't change.


Weight varies more with water content than volume. The 100 tons will change if moisture evaporates from the corn.


Mr. Right: The problem in dairy farming, as with so many other aspects of farming, is that the farmer has no control of costs or prices. Dairy farmers do not set prices - they get paid for their milk what their consumers decide to pay. Dairy farmers do not get to set prices for feed - they have to pay what market forces decide they should pay. Unlike a factory, you can't simply shut off or turn on a dairy farm.


How do you figure that dairy farmers are getting screwed both ways? In your first scenario the buyer dictates price, but in the second seller dictates. Care to explain why you believe that is so? Also, of the three dairies down the highway from me, one of them is closed, so I disagree that it's can't be turned off. Sell off the cows to other dairies or butchers. Tell the feed suppliers to stop delivery. Point the employees to other dairies or the state Dept. of Workforce Solutions. If the price of milk rises to where the demand can increase, then start the place up again. Unlike, say, a coke factory, none of the dairy equipment is damaged by the shutdown process.
 
2012-12-06 05:54:58 AM  

Yoyo:
Mr. Right: The problem in dairy farming, as with so many other aspects of farming, is that the farmer has no control of costs or prices. Dairy farmers do not set prices - they get paid for their milk what their consumers decide to pay. Dairy farmers do not get to set prices for feed - they have to pay what market forces decide they should pay. Unlike a factory, you can't simply shut off or turn on a dairy farm.

How do you figure that dairy farmers are getting screwed both ways? In your first scenario the buyer dictates price, but in the second seller dictates. Care to explain why you believe that is so? Also, of the three dairies down the highway from me, one of them is closed, so I disagree that it's can't be turned off. Sell off the cows to other dairies or butchers. Tell the feed suppliers to stop delivery. Point the employees to other dairies or the state Dept. of Workforce Solutions. If the price of milk rises to where the demand can increase, then start the place up again. Unlike, s ...


Dairy farmers have no control over the prices they are paid for their product. Prices are set by what milk processing plants are willing to pay.

Meanwhile, they also have no control over the costs they must pay for feed and equipment. Those prices are set by commodities markets, in which farmers are but bit players. A dairy farmer has to compete with ethanol plants, HFCS producers, and Post Toasties for corn so he doesn't just get to set a price he's willing to pay or he won't have feed for his cows.

As to changing production - it's difficult at best. If you simply sell off the cows, the market is glutted and you get nothing. Then, when you want to increase production you're going to pay a huge price in competition with everyone else that wants to start milking because the price went up. And, if your equipment stands idle for more than a couple days, the restart and inspection process is costly and will more than likely mean that most of your equipment has to be upgraded to meet new standards that would not have applied had you kept using your old, and very serviceable, equipment.
 
2012-12-06 05:56:42 AM  

log_jammin: Omahawg: lastly,

oh my lord....


This. Big girls are not my thing, but that's a friggin force of nature right there.


Also, on topic, you don't let the free market boom/bust cycle loose on any national ag industry that you can't live without, because sooner or later you'll get a season bad enough that most of your farmers will go under. All of you lactards aside, most of this country is rather attached to dairy products. And if any of you motherfarkers put my cheese fix in jeopardy, I WILL cut you.
 
2012-12-06 05:56:51 AM  
"Unlike, say, a coke factory, none of the dairy equipment is damaged by the shutdown process."

Cept of course the cows.
 
2012-12-06 07:02:40 AM  
Jesus, what is the big deal with milk prices? We only buy a gallon a week. I am more concerned with CHEESE prices. Going to start making my own. Need to find local raw milk for that.
 
2012-12-06 07:10:06 AM  

Lionel Mandrake: GODDAMMIT 0BAMA


i26.photobucket.com
 
2012-12-06 07:36:00 AM  
A gallon of organic milk costs about $12 in canada already.
 
2012-12-06 07:38:44 AM  
$4 for a half gallon for me too. Damned I wish that the lactose - free people would just put out gallon sizes. That way there would be a gallon for me (non fat) and a gallon for hubby & Kid (full fat) and we wouldn't have 4 or more damned containers in the cart at one time making everyone look at us funny.
 
2012-12-06 07:45:22 AM  
Regarding food, there is a compelling societal reason to ensure production of more than is needed. If you produce 10% more than is used in a good year, then during a bad year you can still produce enough to feed everyone. If left completely to market forces that 10% overproduction would be reduced so that when a bad year hits, you don't have enough to feed everyone.
 
2012-12-06 07:49:39 AM  

brobinson2001: She's cute. Bet she'd give good head.


In my experience those two things are generally mutually exclusive.
 
2012-12-06 08:03:38 AM  
At that price, I'll just switch to Malk.
 
2012-12-06 08:09:36 AM  
$6 a gallon?

I need to review the zoning laws for my backyard. I am sure I could fit a Holstein back there.
 
2012-12-06 08:15:12 AM  
I only drink Tuscan.
 
2012-12-06 08:20:18 AM  

Mr. Right: Just like any other government program (or like heroin) dairy price supports are addictive. Market players like dairy processing plants, cheese plants, dried milk plants, etc. are well aware of this and bid the price of milk accordingly - if their profits are a bit low and their demand is a bit soft, they just drop the price of their raw material (milk ...


Subsidies did to milk what they did to corn and wheat. The small farmer got crowded/bought out by investment firms/farms who invested in mega production facilities. The documentary, King Corn, could be used for the dairy industry as well. Small local farms hardly exist anymore in most parts of the country.
 
2012-12-06 08:24:26 AM  

nmemkha: [www.grocerycouponnetwork.com image 270x224]

Problem?


Yes. We're talking about milk, not whatever it is that you posted.
 
2012-12-06 08:30:31 AM  
$1.99 a gallon at Aldi / Michigan / probably a loss-leader
 
2012-12-06 08:40:01 AM  

BHShaman: Subsidies did to milk what they did to corn and wheat. The small farmer got crowded/bought out by investment firms/farms who invested in mega production facilities. The documentary, King Corn, could be used for the dairy industry as well. Small local farms hardly exist anymore in most parts of the country.


You are absolutely correct. Small farms that do exist are now considered niche farms. For dairy, it is simply not economically feasible to have less than about 300 cows - 6000 is better. When I was a kid, anyone with 100 cows was considered too big for the farmer to even be able to manage that many cows and keep track of them the way a farmer should. Cows suffer under current management practices.
 
2012-12-06 08:45:17 AM  

GAT_00: Bring on the glorious free market assrape, just the way unregulated free market should work.


Milk is one of the most regulated farm products... including price floors...

How are you absolutely wrong all the time?
 
2012-12-06 08:51:25 AM  
images1.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2012-12-06 08:59:07 AM  

Walosi: I'm paying $5.09/gal. Funny that this was greenlighted because I have been wondering what the rest of America is paying. I have been going through a gallon a day lately.


Walmart milk is about $2.50/gallon this week in northwest Ohio.
 
2012-12-06 09:01:49 AM  
publix is $3.75 a gallon here in farks favorite state
 
2012-12-06 09:02:17 AM  

Bomb Head Mohammed: "A dairy industry without a farm bill could lead to much higher milk prices in the US."

because, you know, what farm bills do is convince farmers and agribusiness to work for less money.

I have absolutely no problem with $6/gallon milk if it means no subsidies. We'll end up better for it in the long term.


I'd have no problem with dropping the subsidies if it meant a subsequent drop in the taxes I pay to pay those subsidies... it would help even things out. But we know that taxes are not going down any time soon, so an increase in the price of milk becomes yet another tax on the poor. Too bad we didn't have any election promises about not raising taxes on peeps making less than $250k. I might have voted for a guy who actually meant that.
 
2012-12-06 09:08:44 AM  
When I was 14 I got a cool birthday card that listed interesting things about the year you were born, compared prices then and now, etc. They came from a Hallmark kiosk thing in their card stores.

In 1983 the price of milk was $1.92 per gallon, and in 1997 (the year I got the card) it was $3.60. Gas was $1.16 and $1.32, respectively.

This post was not meant to contribute in any way
 
2012-12-06 09:14:02 AM  
As a farmer working on end of year books today, I'm getting a kick...

//not really. What a crappy year.
 
2012-12-06 09:53:36 AM  
Already been done.

bmadore.squarespace.com

/Oooh, and this is the PERFECT thread for this image.
//It only happens once a century when the moon is in the eighth house of Aquarius. The latest reincarnation did not run according to plan...
 
2012-12-06 10:02:06 AM  
I suppose this means a gallon of milk in Hawaii will be around $9.
 
2012-12-06 10:20:28 AM  
BoxOfBees: "As a Libertarian who is not an outrageous free-marketer, why the hell do we need to constantly subsidize, price-fix, and choose winners in food markets by pouring government funds into some programs (but not others) at taxpayer expense?"

Because the early-primary states are all food-production states.
So it ain't got shiat to do with any attempt to manage food production; it's just corporate welfare to curry favor.
 
2012-12-06 10:43:08 AM  

Mr. Right: You are absolutely correct. Small farms that do exist are now considered niche farms. For dairy, it is simply not economically feasible to have less than about 300 cows - 6000 is better. When I was a kid, anyone with 100 cows was considered too big for the farmer to even be able to manage that many cows and keep track of them the way a farmer should. Cows suffer under current management practices.


actually, with current feed and fuel prices, it's the small family dairy farms that are still clinging to existence. they have lower labor costs because they have less hired help, and smaller feed bills because they mostly grow their own feed instead of purchasing it. we're milking about 250 head currently, and we're one of the largest dairy operations in the area - most everyone else milks 60-100 head. with current prices we're making less than half of what the smaller operations are actually sustainable. it's the large operations with hired help and huge feed bills that are struggling the most.
 
2012-12-06 10:44:32 AM  
that should say:
with current prices we're making less than half of what we need to just pay the bills. the smaller operations are actually sustainable. it's the large operations with hired help and huge feed bills that are struggling the most.
 
2012-12-06 11:06:50 AM  

bookman: LOL! Like I've said before: food riots by 2016-2017. Chickens coming home to roost. OPM eventually runs out, suckers.


Yes, its hilarious. But I'm sure YOU won't be affected while your friends (OK, let's go with Neighbors instead) starve, right? Cuz you have 10 gallons of water in your cellar and 3 acres of zucchini squash growing. And some guns with a THOUSAND rounds of Muslim-killers, right???
 
2012-12-06 11:10:06 AM  

Omahawg:
moo

fat chick thread?

[bronanthebarbarian.files.wordpress.com image 407x459]


Looking at that picture made me realize something I didn't know about myself. I would totally go for that. Thanks for my new self-awareness.
 
2012-12-06 11:10:18 AM  

magtec: we're milking about 250 head currently, and we're one of the largest dairy operations in the area - most everyone else milks 60-100 head. with current prices


Whereabouts are you? We're milking 60 jerseys in central Ontario/

Mr. Right: You are absolutely correct. Small farms that do exist are now considered niche farms. For dairy, it is simply not economically feasible to have less than about 300 cows - 6000 is better. When I was a kid, anyone with 100 cows was considered too big for the farmer to even be able to manage that many cows and keep track of them the way a farmer should. Cows suffer under current management practices


So I know you're a right wing kind of a guy, but how do you feel about canada's supply management system?
 
2012-12-06 11:17:31 AM  
1.99 a gallon for milk at Aldi in Dallas
2.99 for gas at QT
 
2012-12-06 11:21:40 AM  

amishkarl: Whereabouts are you? We're milking 60 jerseys in central Ontario/


the outskirts of the twin cities metro (minneapolis/st. paul, minnesota). all holsteins here.
 
2012-12-06 11:26:45 AM  

amishkarl: So I know you're a right wing kind of a guy, but how do you feel about canada's supply management system?


Not familiar with it. Can you enlighten me?
 
2012-12-06 11:32:27 AM  

SwiftFox: Once upon a mid-day sunny, while I savored Nuts 'N Honey,
With my Tuscan Whole Milk, 1 gal, 128 fl. oz., I swore
As I went on with my lapping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at the icebox door.....


Somebody get this farker an internets. That was beautiful.
 
2012-12-06 11:32:47 AM  

Omahawg: fat chick thread?


I'd butter her muffin.

SEriously though, Milk? Eh, I like coconut milk or soy milk better. My only concern is that cheese will be more expensive. I love me some cheese.

/I sound fat.
 
2012-12-06 11:43:38 AM  
The Canadian Dairy Commision calculates an estimated volume of milk needed in Canada in a given year, based on historical consumption. The farmers hold quota for a certain amount of butterfat. If the market expands, CDC grants every farmer an increase in (non-saleable) quota. If the market contracts, CDC revokes some quota starting with the nonsaleable portion. Milk price is determined by a cost of production formula and by where the milk is headed (the price of milk destined for cheese plants is lower than the price for fluid milk) Then there's border tarriffs on imports to keep farmers from being run out of business by American megafarms, subsidized europeans, etc. (Although 5% of our market is tarriff free)

The price of saleable quota is capped at $25000 per kg of butterfat. A kg of quota can be filled every day.

All in all the average farm price for milk was $0.71/L last year, and the average herd szie (in Ontario) is 72 cows

It's complicated, and not "free market" , but it allows farmer to make a living without cutting corners on animal care.

/not sure how well I've done explaining
 
2012-12-06 11:51:31 AM  

muddythinker: These farmers are complaining about price supports that keep milk prices higher than they would be in a free market. They're scaring people. The price of milk should go down without the price supports. That's what they're afraid of.


That's what I thought as well.

If I remember correctly these protections were put in place during the great depression. During that time the cost of food drop so low it wasn't worth shipping to the big cities, which lead to starvation until the market naturally corrected itself.

I remember reading about ranchers killing herds of cattle and leaving them to rot because it was too expensive to maintain the herds and to ship the meat and leather.

Situations like that are what make libertarians that worship the "invisible hand of the market" laughable. I'm fairly libertarian myself but there needs to be some regulation in the market or we get situations like this.
 
2012-12-06 12:02:46 PM  

Jon iz teh kewl: what about almond milk? it's just like regular milk.


lolno
 
2012-12-06 12:29:12 PM  

amishkarl: The Canadian Dairy Commision calculates an estimated volume of milk needed in Canada in a given year . . .


I am a free market kind of guy but dairy in this country is anything but free market, owing to the fact that in most states, the farmer is not allowed to sell directly to customers. The larger the dairy, the greater the distance between farm and table. It is not terribly dissimilar to the negative effects on the retail industry as a whole and the consolidation of equity into fewer hands that is the result of Wal Mart and other big box stores. In the US, the big operations (retail or ag) are as much the result of government policy and regulation as they are economies of scale and free market capitalism.

Having said that, it would follow that something like you outlined in Canada would not appeal to me in the least. However, we have thoroughly screwed up the food system in the US. It seems that the Canadian system is demand-driven. That is a huge advantage over the US system which encourages over production - except for when it doesn't. I have a real problem with the government paying farmers to destroy their cows in order to reduce supply. In my mind, it's unfair that my neighbor be paid not to milk cows unless I also get paid not to milk cows. I should get more money than he does because I haven't milked cows since I was a teenager so I've never been a part of the problem!

So, as you've explained it, I wouldn't have a huge problem with the Canadian system. A quota of production against anticipated demand would allow the farmer to decide just how many cows he wanted to carry to satisfy that demand. He could make a decision to have more cows that might produce fewer pounds but on substantially less feed so that his unit production cost might be less.

You mentioned the average farm price. Does the government set that price? Or does the price fluctuate based on supply and demand and discrepancies between supply and demand drive changes to quota?

Another question: if you decide to have more cows than is required to fulfill your quota, can you feed excess milk to calves (instead of milk replacer) or hogs? Or are you required to simply dump it? I think there could be a market for rose veal and feeding the calves "excess" milk would be a good use and still have a small amount of excess capacity in case a quota in increased.  Hogs do very well on milk, skim milk, or whey (of course, the big confinement operations have no way to use it but that's there problem).
 
2012-12-06 12:41:17 PM  

Mr. Right: You mentioned the average farm price. Does the government set that price? Or does the price fluctuate based on supply and demand and discrepancies between supply and demand drive changes to quota


The governement doesn't set the price, its calculated by the provincial marketing board based on estimated cost of production, however it does respond somewhat to world milk supply in that if world price is very low, milk will flow over the tarriff wall displacing canadian milk forcing us to either cut poduction or lower our price.

Farmer's can feed excess milk to calves or hogs (but you can't keep hogs in the same building as cows.) There's some market for veal calves - all our bulls go to a veal guy- however the margin is pretty tight on it.

If farmers build an on-farm processing facility they can sell directly to the public. There's 3 farms in Ontario that do that (its a recent regulatory change) currently, and some on farm cheese plants as well.
 
2012-12-06 12:42:25 PM  

Mr. Right: the big confinement operations have no way to use it but that's there their problem).


FTFM. Self-offended on one of my biggest pet peeves. Embarrassing.
 
2012-12-06 12:44:37 PM  
So, I probably missed it, but has anyone put this here yet?

http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2011/11/dairy-industry-making-a-killing - by-killing-cows/#.UMDZNIPEZ8E
 
2012-12-06 12:54:02 PM  
Also, Hemp Milk. Yum. Tempt original Hemp Milk. Super food. i never thought I'd find something I loved as much as milk. I was wrong. Too bad it's illegal to grow in the US. Unless your Canada, then Hooray, it's illegal to grow in the US! Look at all the money we're making! Stupid US being afraid of EVERYTHING they don't understand. It's not like theirs tons of research and science about this plant or anything.
 
2012-12-06 12:57:57 PM  

amishkarl: Mr. Right: You mentioned the average farm price. Does the government set that price? Or does the price fluctuate based on supply and demand and discrepancies between supply and demand drive changes to quota

The governement doesn't set the price, its calculated by the provincial marketing board based on estimated cost of production, however it does respond somewhat to world milk supply in that if world price is very low, milk will flow over the tarriff wall displacing canadian milk forcing us to either cut poduction or lower our price.

Farmer's can feed excess milk to calves or hogs (but you can't keep hogs in the same building as cows.) There's some market for veal calves - all our bulls go to a veal guy- however the margin is pretty tight on it.

If farmers build an on-farm processing facility they can sell directly to the public. There's 3 farms in Ontario that do that (its a recent regulatory change) currently, and some on farm cheese plants as well.


The way you've explained it, there are a whole lot worse forms of government intervention in the dairy industry. The one in the US, for instance. I would favor a system such as Canada's over our own. Of course, I'm not a dairy farmer. I just live near a bunch of them and listen to them biatch about our system down at the coffee shop.

We have one local farm (and I think there is one other over on the other side of the state) that make their own cheese. There are also a couple of farms that have made the investment to bottle their own. I have been told that getting that accomplished involved a serious commitment to wading through tons of regulations that are designed to protect the big processing plants at the expense of any farmer uppity enough to think he should be able to sell directly to the household that consumes the milk. The upside is that they control their price in a way that they never could before. And customers like the idea of knowing where their milk comes from, just as they do the rest of their food.
 
2012-12-06 01:15:01 PM  

Mr. Right: The way you've explained it, there are a whole lot worse forms of government intervention in the dairy industry. The one in the US, for instance. I would favor a system such as Canada's over our own. Of course, I'm not a dairy farmer. I just live near a bunch of them and listen to them biatch about our system down at the coffee shop


Yeah. It works. Of course, the Canadian right wing hates it because it is government intervention, and the left hates it cuz the price of dairy product is higher than in border states (mostly loss leader to bring suckers down from Canada). So far successive Liberal (centre) and Conservative governments have realised that they'd have worse problem if they abolished it. But they're under a lot of pressure from the restaurant association (the big chains want cheap cheese), and foreign governments. Americans want it gones o they can sell into our market (but not give up their own), Europe, (same thing,) New Zealand wantis gone so that their current markets don't get the bright idea of copying it. (malaysia and Indonesia have both been trying to establish domestic dairy industries for years, but every time they get started new Zealand floods the market and drives them bankrupt)

We try not to get too worried. When my dad started the farm in 81 people told himhe was stupid, quota was just going to disappear ina few years.
i
 
2012-12-06 01:42:36 PM  

amishkarl: Of course, the Canadian right wing hates it because it is government intervention,


As much as I oppose government intervention in free markets that work, the nature of dairy is not a free market because of the regulations. Raw milk is not allowed to be sold, as an example. I'm not going to get into an argument over the merits or demerits of that; it is simply a fact. That presupposes that a treatment facility is required. The way regulations in the US are drawn up, it is far more profitable for large plants to operate than small ones. The way the distribution system is set up and the size of grocery chains takes a large processor to satisfy the needs of a chain instead of a small plant taking care of a handful of mom and pop stores. So some form of government intervention is required to ameliorate the amount of intervention that is already in place.

One facet of my opposition to overbearing government regulations is that they tend to favor large producers. After all, it's much easier to keep track of one facility that processes a million pounds a day than 10 plants processing 100,000 pounds a day. It's also much easier to track cash flows for IRS purposes. I don't mind pure food and drug regulations in the least. As a matter of fact, I kind of like the notion that what I'm paying for won't unexpectedly kill me. It's all the baggage that gets tacked on to those regulations that amounts to overbearing interference.

Also, as you point out, when other countries are subsidizing their farmers it gets pretty dicey for a government to try to stay completely away from any kind of intervention and have that industry survive domestically. While I don't mind imports, I'd hate to rely on them because we have no domestic supply.

I'm glad that the Canadian system is working for you. And you're right about New Zealand. I frequently hear that country mentioned around the coffee shop. And never favorably by any of the dairy farmers. A few years ago when they had a severe drought and it decimated their production, I could detect a certain unholy glee amongst a few of my neighbors.
 
2012-12-06 04:06:06 PM  

SwiftFox: Once upon a mid-day sunny, while I savored Nuts 'N Honey,
With my Tuscan Whole Milk, 1 gal, 128 fl. oz., I swore
As I went on with my lapping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at the icebox door.
'Bad condensor, that,' I muttered, 'vibrating the icebox door -
Only this, and nothing more.'

Not to sound like a complainer, but, in an inept half-gainer,
I provoked my bowl to tip and spill its contents on the floor.
Stupefied, I came to muddle over that increasing puddle,
Burgeoning deluge of that which I at present do adore -
Snowy Tuscan wholesomeness exclusively produced offshore -
Purg'ed here for evermore.

And the pool so white and silky, filled me with a sense of milky
Ardor of the type fantastic of a loss not known before,
So that now, to still the throbbing of my heart, while gently sobbing,
I retreated, heading straightway for the tempting icebox door -
Heedless of that pitter-patter tapping at the icebox door -
I resolved to have some more.

Presently my soul grew stronger; hesitating then no longer,
'This,' said I, 'requires an extra dram of milk, my favorite pour.'
To the icebox I aspired, motivated to admire
How its avocado pigment complemented my decor.
Then I grasped its woodgrain handle - here I opened wide the door; -
Darkness there, and nothing more.

Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing,
Doubting, dreaming dreams of Tuscans I had known before
But the light inside was broken, and the darkness gave no token,
And the only words there spoken were my whispered words, 'No more!'
Coke and beer, some ketchup I set eyes on, and an apple core -
Merely this and nothing more.

Back toward the table turning, all my soul within me burning,
Soon again I heard a tapping somewhat louder than before.
'Surely,' said I, 'surely that is something at my window lattice;
Let me see then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore -
Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore; -
'Tis the wind a ...


Golf clap.
 
2012-12-06 06:31:56 PM  

The Irresponsible Captain: Already been done.

[bmadore.squarespace.com image 600x208]

/Oooh, and this is the PERFECT thread for this image.


That cartoon needs a "I could have had a V8!" added somewhere.
 
2012-12-06 11:59:58 PM  

sisterinarms: Also, Hemp Milk. Yum. Tempt original Hemp Milk. Super food. i never thought I'd find something I loved as much as milk. I was wrong. Too bad it's illegal to grow in the US. Unless your Canada, then Hooray, it's illegal to grow in the US! Look at all the money we're making! Stupid US being afraid of EVERYTHING they don't understand. It's not like theirs tons of research and science about this plant or anything.


I don't even know where to begin here.
 
2012-12-07 01:07:31 AM  
at the age of 41, milk is only good for a few things. the few nights a week i don't drink myself into a blackout/coma. those nights i enjoy a bowl of cheerios, raisin bran or rice/corn chex. or a few cookies and some milk. i think milk helps me to sleep.

i know 20 beers helps me sleep better than a quart of milk, that is why i usually drink many much more beer than i do milk.

/milk was 4.99/gallon at target today. gas was 3.31
 
2012-12-07 01:58:24 AM  
how much is a gallon? is that bigger than a litre??
 
2012-12-07 02:15:15 AM  

What_Would_Jimi_Do: at the age of 41, milk is only good for a few things. the few nights a week i don't drink myself into a blackout/coma. those nights i enjoy a bowl of cheerios, raisin bran or rice/corn chex. or a few cookies and some milk. i think milk helps me to sleep.

i know 20 beers helps me sleep better than a quart of milk, that is why i usually drink many much more beer than i do milk.

/milk was 4.99/gallon at target today. gas was 3.31


oblig
 
2012-12-07 01:12:50 PM  
get into an ANR , problem solved
 
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