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(News.com.au)   New Zealand giving unemployed one-way airfares to Australia. It's a little game they play   (news.com.au) divider line 66
    More: Amusing, New Zealand, Australia  
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7289 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Dec 2012 at 9:10 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-06 12:19:20 AM

Forbidden Doughnut: gaspode: thisispete:

The average Kiwi living in Australia pays more in tax than the average Australian and gets far less in return.

And yet Australians continue to believe their lying shiatbag politicians who use kiwis as scapegoats to deflect from their own failures. Sad really

I see a direct parallel with the United States here...


Lying shiatbag politicians are not specific to any particular continent.
 
2012-12-06 12:53:33 AM
i47.tinypic.com
 
2012-12-06 12:53:51 AM

maddermaxx:

Bah, slagging all of us because of some right wingers is pretty stupid. Just because some right wing derpers and Murdoch's News.com.au are trying to find some ways to Americanise the country's politics is no reason to blame the rest of us.


I'm only really slagging your politicians (who Im 100% sure you will agree are especially vile).. most aussies are good folks of course, but too many buy this line of crap, they truly do.
 
2012-12-06 12:55:08 AM

Lehk: if they could prove there was a job waiting at their destination.

imokwiththis.jpg


as long as the relocation itself is legal, what is the problem with a social services agency helping clients relocate to a job they have secured but are unable to afford or secure their own relocation costs? (as long as costs are reasonable and secured job is credible , long term, and within the skillset of the client)


The ideal would be to re-locate someone to a job within NZ so that they are a productive member of society (paying income tax). Sending them to Oz means the Kiwis miss out on any income taxes.

You might think, "well, that's better than them being a drain on local coffers", but the NZ National party actually campaigned on the premise of stopping the "brain drain". So it's a major political embarrasment to be caught subsidising flights to Oz.
 
2012-12-06 02:32:35 AM

gaspode: maddermaxx:

Bah, slagging all of us because of some right wingers is pretty stupid. Just because some right wing derpers and Murdoch's News.com.au are trying to find some ways to Americanise the country's politics is no reason to blame the rest of us.

I'm only really slagging your politicians (who Im 100% sure you will agree are especially vile).. most aussies are good folks of course, but too many buy this line of crap, they truly do.


They are probably whingeing about the indigenous brown Kiwi rather than much more common white species.
 
2012-12-06 02:46:47 AM

thisispete: Mantour: as it states: "since then Kiwis receiving the dole have been able to apply for money to migrate to Australia, if they could prove there was a job waiting at their destination."

But can they collect the Australian Dole?

No, they can't. No New Zealander who has arrived since 26 February 2001 can collect Australian welfare. There's no path to citizenship (except by marriage or the same rules for other nationalities), so there are very few New Zealanders living in Australia who can collect Australian welfare. Even when there are emergency payments for floods, bush fires or other natural disasters.

The average Kiwi living in Australia pays more in tax than the average Australian and gets far less in return.


They can get the extremely generous middle class welfare or family tax benefit from the day they arrive if they have kids. They usually have half a dozen on arrival or soon after.
 
2012-12-06 04:00:55 AM
If one avoids the knee-jerk reaction and looks at this in context, they'll find:

1. It looks like only a handful of people (16 confirmed cases, full review in progress) have benefited from the free ticket to Australia initiative. If those few people have a confirmed job waiting for them, and all that stands in the way is getting a ticket, then this is a smart move by the Kiwis.

2. Everyone wins. The unemployed person gets free airfare and becomes employed. The Australians benefit from getting a vacant job filled. The Kiwis benefit by making a one-time payment instead of an indeterminate period paying unemployment and other related benefits.
 
2012-12-06 04:23:21 AM

starsrift: Australia's pretty hungry for employees right now, so this makes a lot of sense.


As an Australian administration contractor (with much experience in a range of environments doing a broad range of challenging work looking for relatively simple work for which I should be vastly overqualified) whose last government employment contract ran out in October and who just spent most of the last month terrifyingly underemployed, I think this is changing fast. A lot of Australian companies are shrinking and laying off workers. Mining is slowing down for the time being, governments are cutting services to the bone and offering voluntary redundancies, job ads are well down. The last six months have all been bad news, even if we're better off than many because our financial regulatory systems (one of few things I'll compliment former Treasurer Peter Costello for) worked when many were going mad on the global financial bubble.

Thankfully I found a job which should run a few months or longer with a private company. I won't name it but it's a multinational distribution firm with 'independent distributors' (ie members of the public) selling to their friends and signing up new members for fun and profit. Their business model is holding up really well in this time of belt-tightening and sales are booming. It's more the exception than the rule for most Australian workplaces right now though.
 
2012-12-06 04:43:37 AM

Aussie_As: starsrift: Australia's pretty hungry for employees right now, so this makes a lot of sense.

As an Australian administration contractor (with much experience in a range of environments doing a broad range of challenging work looking for relatively simple work for which I should be vastly overqualified) whose last government employment contract ran out in October and who just spent most of the last month terrifyingly underemployed, I think this is changing fast. A lot of Australian companies are shrinking and laying off workers. Mining is slowing down for the time being, governments are cutting services to the bone and offering voluntary redundancies, job ads are well down. The last six months have all been bad news, even if we're better off than many because our financial regulatory systems (one of few things I'll compliment former Treasurer Peter Costello for) worked when many were going mad on the global financial bubble.

Thankfully I found a job which should run a few months or longer with a private company. I won't name it but it's a multinational distribution firm with 'independent distributors' (ie members of the public) selling to their friends and signing up new members for fun and profit. Their business model is holding up really well in this time of belt-tightening and sales are booming. It's more the exception than the rule for most Australian workplaces right now though.


We have an unemployment rate of 5.2 per cent. While periods of unemployment are distressing for anyone, your whole month of underemployment is not exactly the most scary proposition I have ever heard of.

redcliffe They can get the extremely generous middle class welfare or family tax benefit from the day they arrive if they have kids. They usually have half a dozen on arrival or soon after.

Let me guess, you're a troll from Brisbane. Don't like the brown much up there, eh?
 
2012-12-06 06:19:08 AM
I'm a bit odd, I'm an Australian, but I'd love to live and work in New Zealand for a while. A different culture, and a more agreeable climate.

But yeah, mostly I lack the funds and motivation to actually go through with it.
 
2012-12-06 06:56:39 AM

steerforth:
Let me guess, you're a troll from Brisbane. Don't like the brown much up there, eh?


Nah my problem is with welfare dependancy, particularly on middle class welfare. Too many people on way high incomes demanding their government welfare...
 
2012-12-06 09:34:37 AM
I would gladly take a free ticket to Australia.

Any offers?
 
2012-12-06 09:45:51 AM
Is Zoe 'the cat' Bell unemployed?
files.mymovies.dk
Because if that Ziwi needs a place to stay I will spring for a one way ticket to my house.
 
2012-12-06 09:04:13 PM

Crewmannumber6: The_Sponge: On a very special episode of "Flight of the Concords".....

My grandad met my grandmum in Australia. And by 'met' I mean raped.


Scuse me I gotta go murder a brown snake
 
2012-12-06 11:06:57 PM

steerforth: Aussie_As: starsrift: Australia's pretty hungry for employees right now, so this makes a lot of sense.

As an Australian administration contractor (with much experience in a range of environments doing a broad range of challenging work looking for relatively simple work for which I should be vastly overqualified) whose last government employment contract ran out in October and who just spent most of the last month terrifyingly underemployed, I think this is changing fast. A lot of Australian companies are shrinking and laying off workers. Mining is slowing down for the time being, governments are cutting services to the bone and offering voluntary redundancies, job ads are well down. The last six months have all been bad news, even if we're better off than many because our financial regulatory systems (one of few things I'll compliment former Treasurer Peter Costello for) worked when many were going mad on the global financial bubble.

Thankfully I found a job which should run a few months or longer with a private company. I won't name it but it's a multinational distribution firm with 'independent distributors' (ie members of the public) selling to their friends and signing up new members for fun and profit. Their business model is holding up really well in this time of belt-tightening and sales are booming. It's more the exception than the rule for most Australian workplaces right now though.

We have an unemployment rate of 5.2 per cent. While periods of unemployment are distressing for anyone, your whole month of underemployment is not exactly the most scary proposition I have ever heard of.

redcliffe They can get the extremely generous middle class welfare or family tax benefit from the day they arrive if they have kids. They usually have half a dozen on arrival or soon after.

Let me guess, you're a troll from Brisbane. Don't like the brown much up there, eh?


redcliffe sounds more like my dad from suburban Sydney. Ignorance can be found in all parts of Australia. And the world for that matter.
 
2012-12-06 11:09:24 PM

doczoidberg: I would gladly take a free ticket to Australia.

Any offers?


I was going to suggest we swap places for a couple of years. Then I saw Detroit in your profile.
 
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