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(Huffington Post)   6.5 million US teens and young adults are not in school or working. Probably because it's hard to do either one when you're serving out your sentence in the state lockup   (huffingtonpost.com ) divider line
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1547 clicks; posted to Business » on 05 Dec 2012 at 9:16 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



46 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2012-12-05 08:59:05 AM  
That's about one out of every FIFTY people, TOTAL, in the US. Including babbies (who, of course, don't work...this isn't China, after all!)
 
2012-12-05 09:25:13 AM  
What are these kids doing all day? If mine couldn't find a job, I'd shove him/her out the door and make them volunteer anywhere to at least get experience
 
2012-12-05 09:25:48 AM  
Land of the Free. Home of the Incarcerated.
 
2012-12-05 09:26:09 AM  
What we need are low-paying jobs!
 
2012-12-05 09:35:23 AM  
Why would a minimum wage employer higher a teenager that needs the job for beer money and could quit at any time when they can hire an adult that's desperate enough to take the job so that they don't starve. The adult is much more motivated to show up to work every day.

/We're so screwed
 
2012-12-05 09:41:06 AM  
Not sure what their math is, but "teen" covers 13-19 years old, so by definition 5/7 of all teens are still dependents and in high-school. High-school jobs are nice experiments but by no means necessary or expected. So I'd expect 5/7 of teens to be unemployed and have no problem with it.
 
2012-12-05 09:41:47 AM  
Are there no prisons? And the Union workhouses? Are they still in operation?
 
2012-12-05 09:47:12 AM  
But the Bush tax cuts are still in effect. Why won't the Job Creators help us?
 
2012-12-05 10:18:46 AM  
Aren't there coal mines out there that need some laborers?
 
2012-12-05 10:22:43 AM  
if you are in school that should be your primary and only job: school. learning, being the best student you can be.

in reality we have a crapload of teens that are barely raised by people who never should have had babies to begin with. they don't want to be in school and many of them will be dead before they are 21.

keep letting any morans have babies and they will. in abundance.
 
2012-12-05 10:28:00 AM  
19 yr old engineering student here. I'm also working my way through school to keep my student loan debt low. Bootstrappy!

/I have no social life.
//And I don't get a lot of sleep.
///Kill me.
 
2012-12-05 10:31:10 AM  

Free Radical: But the Bush tax cuts are still in effect. Why won't the Job Creators help us?


Didn't Obama extend the cuts?

/still bubbubbut Bush?
 
2012-12-05 10:31:37 AM  

Free Radical: But the Bush tax cuts are still in effect. Why won't the Job Creators help us?


Job Creators couldn't hire them because they knew the tax cuts would expire. Now if the cuts were made permanent...
 
2012-12-05 10:36:15 AM  

Summer Glau's Love Slave: 19 yr old engineering student here. I'm also working my way through school to keep my student loan debt low. Bootstrappy!

/I have no social life.
//And I don't get a lot of sleep.
///Kill me.


I know how you feel. Hang in there, trying to minimize student loan debt is the best thing you can do for yourself long-term.

/Churned through 15 months of an accelerated masters program while having a full time and part time job.
//part time job basically paid for alcohol to deal with the other BS
 
2012-12-05 10:43:39 AM  

Muta: Free Radical: But the Bush tax cuts are still in effect. Why won't the Job Creators help us?

Job Creators couldn't hire them because they knew the tax cuts would expire. Now if the cuts were made permanent...


...then they couldn't hire anyone else because of Obamacare. Or the debt. Or solar flares. Whatever.
 
2012-12-05 10:47:50 AM  

KrispyKritter: if you are in school that should be your primary and only job: school. learning, being the best student you can be.


Son of Two Teachers reporting in. This was my Mother's battle cry - School is your Job.

It's all solid advice. I held a few jobs here and there (Zaxby's, Starbucks, etc.) but mostly as experiments in wanting more out of life, and in what i don't want to do for the rest of it. But i always returned to my studious ways, and transitioning from studying all the time to working all the time has been a lesson in relearning how to live - and to live much better than i was before when life was just worrying about the next exam and how much time i have to play Call of Duty today.

At 25 i am just escaping out of the 20 - 24 bracket this year with 2 degrees, 19 years of education under my belt ,a well paying job CAREER, and have met the most wonderful girl since moving away from my home town.

TL;DR FOCUS ON YOUR DAMN STUDIES - Get every damn dime out of your education and it will pay off in the end. The loans might not seem like it's worth it, but the intangible things about taking charge of your own life is freeing.

/I weep for my unmotivated generation
//It sucks and is awesome at the same time to be the responsible one 
///Rant over
 
2012-12-05 10:50:24 AM  
My brother got fired in 2009 for being stupid on the job. He put landscaping equipment on a truck without securing it, guess what happens when you hit a bump on the interstate at 60 mph? Anyway, he was unemployed for about a year, then eventually got off his ass and got a job at a home improvement store. Before finding a job, he stayed in his room and played video games 16 hours a day. My stepfather was too soft on him to do anything about it... my late mother would've threatened to kick him out after 2-3 months.
 
2012-12-05 10:53:38 AM  

cefm: So I'd expect 5/7 of teens to be unemployed and have no problem with it.


Yeah, but they're not in school either.

So WTF are they doing?
 
2012-12-05 11:07:39 AM  

guilt by association: Before finding a job, he stayed in his room and played video games 16 hours a day.


Thread over, we have a winner.
 
2012-12-05 11:29:20 AM  

pivazena: What are these kids doing all day? If mine couldn't find a job, I'd shove him/her out the door and make them volunteer anywhere to at least get experience


Sleep all day, watch videos and gaming all nights, with a few breaks to complain about the lack of "good" food in the fridge. I'm glad neither of my wife's kids (20 & 23) live here.
 
2012-12-05 11:42:03 AM  

Expolaris: KrispyKritter: if you are in school that should be your primary and only job: school. learning, being the best student you can be.

Son of Two Teachers reporting in. This was my Mother's battle cry - School is your Job.

It's all solid advice.


For the most part, it's solid advice. That said, there are some teens out there who aren't doing this for spending money or experimentation: the family actually needs the extra cash, and the teen is chipping in. This is obviously not an optimal situation, but it's tough to condemn a teen who is actually helping out the family.
 
2012-12-05 11:55:37 AM  

KrispyKritter: if you are in school that should be your primary and only job: school. learning, being the best student you can be.


Complete bs. I worked my way through school from 16-25 years old, sometimes carrying more than standard credit hours and a 30+ hour job. Absolutely the best education in life skills by juggling work/personal/academic life to get you ready for work/family life afterwards. Drinking your way through school while playing video games to kill time is the way most of that age group experiences life.

//I carried an A average the whole time and had scholarships the whole way through
//csb
 
2012-12-05 11:56:31 AM  
All the jobs I used to see kids in now have Mexicans working them.
 
2012-12-05 12:13:07 PM  
One thing's for sure: There's only one correct way to do things and they aren't doing it!
 
2012-12-05 12:20:59 PM  
There's a lot that you can learn from having a job that you have no shot at learning in school.  
 
2012-12-05 12:25:54 PM  

lewismarktwo: One thing's for sure: There's only one correct way to do things and they aren't doing it!


Even if there is not One True Way, it doesn't follow that All Ways Are True. That fallacy, and attempts to "correct" for it, have done a lot of harm over the years.
 
2012-12-05 12:31:37 PM  

Millennium: Expolaris: KrispyKritter: if you are in school that should be your primary and only job: school. learning, being the best student you can be.

Son of Two Teachers reporting in. This was my Mother's battle cry - School is your Job.

It's all solid advice.

For the most part, it's solid advice. That said, there are some teens out there who aren't doing this for spending money or experimentation: the family actually needs the extra cash, and the teen is chipping in. This is obviously not an optimal situation, but it's tough to condemn a teen who is actually helping out the family.


Thus the story of my best friend.

He is the older brother who always had a job to help take care of his family because his father is a shiat bag who walked out early on. All the while his coddled little brother binges on Xbox and Taco Bell.

I lived with the guy for close to 6 years over the course of my education, he always worked shiat jobs at Ryan's, Taco Bell, Arby's and every other terrible restaurant that would hire him from his management experience. He tried to keep things in moderation but getting home at different times each day , some times an hour before dawn gave him incredibly bad insomnia.

He had a bit of a paranoid break in the middle of a class, yelling about how demons were inside of his paper. It was told it was not a pretty situation with all those desks and papers flying everywhere. After being detained and held over night for a psych evaluation i had to pick him up from the Hospital - he was rather burned. He left college a few months after that to move back in with his Mom.

He's out on his own again now, still working at Arby's and now living with the little brother who got kicked out of their parent's house for being a 400 pound drain on society who was ruining their parent's relationship.

He did not manage his time between school / work and it ended up harming him greatly. He's got 2 and a half years towards a history degree - which will do precisely nothing for him besides saddle him with crappy loans. If you believe you can balance work and school it's only going to help you out in the end. I wish i could have pulled it off but I needed to focus on my studies and it was the path i was supposed to take. I think it just comes down to being honest with the kind of person you are and what is good for your life.
 
2012-12-05 12:42:30 PM  

KrispyKritter: if you are in school that should be your primary and only job: school. learning, being the best student you can be.


To date, we've fired two people who were right out of school and hadn't ever held a job before. One had a master's. I'd rather work with people who have at least worked a part-time job before they hit the age of 22-30, because that's a little late to learn the social intracies of a workplace. Work isn't school. You don't get to avoid people because you don't like them. You don't get praised for every little thing you do. Being late for work is not the same as being late for class. But most importantly, your motivation for getting the job done is because someone paid you to do it, not because you agree with what's being done.
 
2012-12-05 12:47:03 PM  

Expolaris: If you believe you can balance work and school it's only going to help you out in the end. I wish i could have pulled it off but I needed to focus on my studies and it was the path i was supposed to take. I think it just comes down to being honest with the kind of person you are and what is good for your life.


That's the secret. Only by at least attempting to hold a job and going to school at the same time can you determine what works for you in a responsible way. I know so many kids I went to college with that did not understand that the workplace and college were not very similar environments for levels of responsibility. They were okay in college, but failed miserably in the workforce. When you are younger, you are usually given at least a few chances. When you are 24 and don't know how to behave in the workplace, you usually don't get too many extra chances. The secret is to figure out what works best for you, make a few future plans and adjust the situation so you can succeed at what you do. No single method works for everyone.
 
2012-12-05 01:30:33 PM  
I managed my school/work pretty good back whee I was in college. I would go to school in the day and work at night. The job was pretty easy. The machine would run, I would add things to it now and then, and if it ran well I could study and do my school work. Worked pretty good for years.
 
2012-12-05 01:40:04 PM  

Lsherm: To date, we've fired two people who were right out of school and hadn't ever held a job before. One had a master's. I'd rather work with people who have at least worked a part-time job before they hit the age of 22-30, because that's a little late to learn the social intracies of a workplace. Work isn't school. You don't get to avoid people because you don't like them. You don't get praised for every little thing you do. Being late for work is not the same as being late for class. But most importantly, your motivation for getting the job done is because someone paid you to do it, not because you agree with what's being done.



There lies the great fault of the human brain.
After two anecdotes, people start creating and believing in their own general theories.

Besides, what really makes someone believe that people get praised for every little thing they do in school?
 
2012-12-05 01:49:58 PM  
Well, supply and demand set he price of work.
So we need high unemployment for our masters to make more profit.
 
2012-12-05 02:22:10 PM  

mr0x: There lies the great fault of the human brain.
After two anecdotes, people start creating and believing in their own general theories.


Preach on Brother Mr0x. Data is not the plural of anecdote!
 
2012-12-05 03:03:32 PM  

cefm: Not sure what their math is, but "teen" covers 13-19 years old, so by definition 5/7 of all teens are still dependents and in high-school. High-school jobs are nice experiments but by no means necessary or expected. So I'd expect 5/7 of teens to be unemployed and have no problem with it.


Especially since you need a car to get to a lot of jobs, and 15 hour weeks (which is high given that high school is a 50-70 hour/week job depending on extracurricular and homework load) at $8/hr minus taxes gives you about $100/week.

Since Teenage auto insurance is about $100/month, gas is about $.20/mile, and the car payment is often $3-400, you're basically working in order to afford your car so that you can work.

Or you can not work, break even financially, get way more sleep, get better student aid in college because you're broke, and occasionally have to mooch a ride.

/And for those going '70?', Marching Band was 3 hours/weekday + 10-15 hour competition Saturdays + late-night football games. Could be anywhere from 15-35 hours depending on that week's load. Combine it with the 2 hours of nightly homework (10 minutes/grade) we were legally required to have by the state (and that tended to clump so that one day could be free and the next would have you up until 3 AM), and the 35 hours we spent in school, and 80 hour school weeks were possible.
//And the pit for the musical were practicing until 10:00 at night and on weekends for a month prior (which is the entire reason I never, ever did pit)
 
2012-12-05 03:38:15 PM  
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-12-05 04:35:17 PM  
We're running out of things for people to do that generate a profit (for someone). Individual workers are becoming too efficient.

What happens when there are no new jobs, all possible jobs to create are made, and there's still more people looking for work?

What happens then?
 
2012-12-05 06:16:22 PM  

meyerkev: cefm: Not sure what their math is, but "teen" covers 13-19 years old, so by definition 5/7 of all teens are still dependents and in high-school. High-school jobs are nice experiments but by no means necessary or expected. So I'd expect 5/7 of teens to be unemployed and have no problem with it.

Especially since you need a car to get to a lot of jobs, and 15 hour weeks (which is high given that high school is a 50-70 hour/week job depending on extracurricular and homework load) at $8/hr minus taxes gives you about $100/week.

Since Teenage auto insurance is about $100/month, gas is about $.20/mile, and the car payment is often $3-400, you're basically working in order to afford your car so that you can work.

Or you can not work, break even financially, get way more sleep, get better student aid in college because you're broke, and occasionally have to mooch a ride.

/And for those going '70?', Marching Band was 3 hours/weekday + 10-15 hour competition Saturdays + late-night football games. Could be anywhere from 15-35 hours depending on that week's load. Combine it with the 2 hours of nightly homework (10 minutes/grade) we were legally required to have by the state (and that tended to clump so that one day could be free and the next would have you up until 3 AM), and the 35 hours we spent in school, and 80 hour school weeks were possible.
//And the pit for the musical were practicing until 10:00 at night and on weekends for a month prior (which is the entire reason I never, ever did pit)


Drop the band. Work the job.
Band isn't important.
 
2012-12-05 06:17:12 PM  

Summercat: We're running out of things for people to do that generate a profit (for someone). Individual workers are becoming too efficient.

What happens when there are no new johttp://www.freakonomics.com/2012/12/05/homicide-victims-rarely-talk- to-police-and-other-horrible-headlines/#commentsbs, all possible jobs to create are made, and there's still more people looking for work?

What happens then?


We have a lottery and the winners get the jobs. The losers get remaindered for body parts.
 
2012-12-05 07:10:34 PM  

mr0x: Besides, what really makes someone believe that people get praised for every little thing they do in school?


Beats the hell out of me, I sure didn't. But the two kids I worked with were aghast at what they considered a complete lack of positive feedback.

That's probably not schooling, but it has all the hallmarks of helicopter parenting.
 
2012-12-05 08:19:30 PM  

AcneVulgaris: All the jobs I used to see kids in now have Mexicans working them.


They probably just need to interview better.
 
2012-12-05 08:49:39 PM  

Summercat: We're running out of things for people to do that generate a profit (for someone). Individual workers are becoming too efficient.

What happens when there are no new jobs, all possible jobs to create are made, and there's still more people looking for work?

What happens then?


Institute some sort of Link legislation so the Boomers' heads aren't put on stakes in the next 20 years?
 
2012-12-06 08:17:33 AM  

pivazena: What are these kids doing all day? If mine couldn't find a job, I'd shove him/her out the door and make them volunteer anywhere to at least get experience


Your kid has so little self respect they would do slave labor? Yeah, I'm sure they will get far with that attitude.
 
2012-12-06 09:33:08 AM  
FLIPPING THE BURGERS IN THE PRISON KITCHEN, BOSS!
 
2012-12-06 12:17:21 PM  
These students I work with are always asking for table points or classroom dollar if they are good. I like to tell them that I do not give rewards for doing what is expected of them, but I also won't send them to the principal either. And I take away weeks of recess is singular incidents. No one makes the mistakes again. Ta-da!
 
2012-12-06 04:47:29 PM  

cefm: Not sure what their math is, but "teen" covers 13-19 years old, so by definition 5/7 of all teens are still dependents and in high-school. High-school jobs are nice experiments but by no means necessary or expected. So I'd expect 5/7 of teens to be unemployed and have no problem with it.


It's pretty hard to get all the way to the third paragraph of an article, so I copied it for you below:

The employment rate for teens between the ages of 16 and 19 has fallen 42 percent over the last decade: 2.2 million teens and 4.3 million young adults aged 20 to 24 are neither working nor in school.

Also the first line of the first paragraph makes clear they're talking about kids neither in school nor working.
 
2012-12-06 06:10:02 PM  
I say: so what?

Who says working at some dead end jorb is better than reading Fark and masturbating all day?
 
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