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(BBC)   English judge reprimanded for saying burglary takes a "huge amount of courage"   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 62
    More: Dumbass, Lord Chief Justice, english judges, English  
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2720 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Dec 2012 at 9:35 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-05 06:49:05 AM  
And the coolest crime is robbery

i832.photobucket.com
 
2012-12-05 07:15:09 AM  
In my house your "huge amount of courage" would be splattered all over the walls and I would sue your estate for the clean-up costs and anything else I could dream up.
 
2012-12-05 07:49:08 AM  

maxalt: In my house your "huge amount of courage" would be splattered all over the walls and I would sue your estate for the clean-up costs and anything else I could dream up.


ITG Weekly subscriber.
 
2012-12-05 08:16:59 AM  
Less in England than say Texas.
 
2012-12-05 08:25:10 AM  
What's wrong with saying that it takes courage?

I challenge anyone who says it doesn't take courage to go do it.

Admit it. If there were no possible consequence, you would do it. Therefore, you are afraid of consequences and must be a coward.

Have a nice day.
 
2012-12-05 08:27:29 AM  

maxalt: In my house your "huge amount of courage" would be splattered all over the walls and I would sue your estate for the clean-up costs and anything else I could dream up.


That's why it takes a huge amount of 'courage.' A burglar could be killed by the owners of the home they are trying to burgle. But alas, I'm not sure 'courage' is the proper term here. Maybe desperation?
 
2012-12-05 08:59:59 AM  
In his defense, the judge meant to say that burglary took a huge amount of Irish courage.

Oh, wait...
 
2012-12-05 09:37:51 AM  
Courage, desperation. Same difference.
 
2012-12-05 09:38:23 AM  
Repeat or followup?
 
2012-12-05 09:41:40 AM  
Coming from someone who should know.....

It took a HUGE amount of courage to put that silly mop head on your noggin and than have your photograph taken in public.
WAF.

news.bbcimg.co.uk
 
2012-12-05 09:44:28 AM  
www.greatdreams.com
 
2012-12-05 09:45:38 AM  

notmtwain: What's wrong with saying that it takes courage?


Only the entire context. It's not enough that a "courageous" person displays nerve, but must also do so in the face of knowing opposition. The nerve required to blindside someone -- as during a burglary, for example -- is a lower bar. It also has another word to describe it: "dastardly".

A burglar who phoned his intended victims up a day before and gave them time to prepare could be considered courageous -- and likely ineffectual.
 
2012-12-05 09:46:19 AM  
Who wouldn't want a little courage?

www.hdwallpapersdepot.com
 
2012-12-05 09:46:20 AM  
Well, it does take a type of courage knowing you could get shot in the face over a flat screen, yet do it anyway. It also takes being a complete moron dickbag coward, too.
 
2012-12-05 09:46:23 AM  

Cythraul: maxalt: In my house your "huge amount of courage" would be splattered all over the walls and I would sue your estate for the clean-up costs and anything else I could dream up.

That's why it takes a huge amount of 'courage.' A burglar could be killed by the owners of the home they are trying to burgle. But alas, I'm not sure 'courage' is the proper term here. Maybe desperation?


Maybe sangfroid?
 
2012-12-05 09:46:35 AM  
Ok, so the story mentions that this comment alone is enough to shatter confidense in their legal system while completely overlooking the fact that the burgler is spared jail time... Hmmm, seems to me that England is extremely bassackwards in their thought process. 'Pillory the judge for making' this remark yet allow the criminal to go free. I know that a property owner will do more jail time than the burgler if there is a fight, but sheeze, are property owners required to cook the thief a meal and offer them a spare set of keys to the place?
 
2012-12-05 09:47:10 AM  

maxalt: In my house your "huge amount of courage" would be splattered all over the walls and I would sue your estate for the clean-up costs and anything else I could dream up.


Be honest - you were doing curls with a 15 lb. free-weight while typing that - weren't you?
 
2012-12-05 09:47:30 AM  
"We have been the cowards. Lobbing cruise missiles from two thousand miles away. That's cowardly. Staying in the airplane when it hits the building. Say what you want about it. Not cowardly."
 
2012-12-05 09:48:06 AM  

oldfarthenry: maxalt: In my house your "huge amount of courage" would be splattered all over the walls and I would sue your estate for the clean-up costs and anything else I could dream up.

Be honest - you were doing curls with a 15 lb. free-weight while typing that - weren't you?


With his PENIS!!
 
2012-12-05 09:50:03 AM  
With all due respect Litig8r ; )

"We have been the cowardssmart. Lobbing cruise missiles from two thousand miles away. That's cowardlysmart. Staying in the airplane when it hits the building. Say what you want about it. Not cowardlysmart."
 
2012-12-05 09:50:29 AM  
But burglary hurts rich people, so that makes it OK.
 
2012-12-05 09:50:54 AM  
His statement that prison doesn't do criminals much good may even be true. Of course, we don't put them there for their benefit but for ours.
 
2012-12-05 09:51:55 AM  
I love the term "burgled". It makes robbery sound sexy.
 
2012-12-05 09:53:11 AM  

beta_plus: But burglary hurts rich people, so that makes it OK.


No, only robbery is acceptable. Robin' Hood isn't named "Robin" it was just his job description.
 
2012-12-05 09:53:29 AM  
courage - mental or moral strength to venture, persevere, and withstand danger, fear, or difficulty (according to m-w.com).

I'd say a burglar fits that definition (the mental strength, obviously not the moral, but it says OR).

The problem is that people seem to only want to assign courage to people doing good things. In the same manner that people assign cowardice to bad actions that aren't in fact cowardice. It just makes them feel smugly superior to assign that designation to actions they don't like.
 
2012-12-05 09:54:17 AM  
There's only one letter different between guts and nuts.
 
2012-12-05 09:54:37 AM  
It took a HUGE amount of courage to put that silly mop head on your noggin and than have your photograph taken in public.
WAF.


Ya, those wigs weird me the fark out. They get bigger the higher up you go in the judiciary. The Brits are the Kings of fancy dress. Uniforms and outfits for every occasion. I'd be in big trouble in a British court. I simply wouldn't take them seriously. It'd be like I was in a movie or something.

As for the British intelligensia and political class betraying Britian, the judges attitude plays right along. Refuse to uphold traditional law, the people get more desparate and accept still more government control and tracking as a false hope. "If only people weren't free to drive anywhere they want, then we could control the movement of burglars better. Burglars can grab stuff and put it away in their cars and drive away. This couldn't happen if they had to carry the stolen goods onto a bus. THIS IS WHY WE NEED TO GET RID OF CARS AND PUT EVERYBODY IN GOVERNMENT CONTROLLED MASS TRANSIT"

/And anybody who doesn't put a telescreen in their house for the governemnt to watch their stuff while they're gone, deserves to get ripped off.
 
2012-12-05 09:56:25 AM  

ChipNASA: oldfarthenry: maxalt: In my house your "huge amount of courage" would be splattered all over the walls and I would sue your estate for the clean-up costs and anything else I could dream up.

Be honest - you were doing curls with a 15 lb. free-weight while typing that - weren't you?

With his PENIS!!


In his American flag printed zubaz!
 
2012-12-05 09:57:42 AM  

mark12A: It took a HUGE amount of courage to put that silly mop head on your noggin and than have your photograph taken in public.
WAF.

Ya, those wigs weird me the fark out. They get bigger the higher up you go in the judiciary. The Brits are the Kings of fancy dress. Uniforms and outfits for every occasion. I'd be in big trouble in a British court. I simply wouldn't take them seriously. It'd be like I was in a movie or something.


It's just a tradition that has continued since wearing big puffy wigs like that was fashionable in the 17th/18th century. How can anyone object to that? It's like a living piece of history, a real connection to the past, that's awesome in my book. No matter how small the piece is, or how stupid the thing underneath it is.
 
2012-12-05 10:05:46 AM  
Considering it's an English Judge, they probably thought he said "buggery".
 
2012-12-05 10:08:47 AM  
For yourselves know perfectly that the day of the Lord so cometh as a thief in the night. Thessalonians 5:2

Burglary is God-like
 
2012-12-05 10:16:24 AM  
Good god, people are farking stupid. Of course burglary takes courage. You just don't say it because there are too many stupid people in the world who can't reason properly and will think you mean that burglary is, in some way, good. 

That's why the judge was reprimanded: there are many very stupid people out there, and using the word "courage" to describe something that is not also virtuous sounds bad to them and would make the judge -- and, by extension, the entire court system -- look bad to those stupid people.
 
2012-12-05 10:20:14 AM  
What courage? The idiot you are making into a hero breaks into a house when nobody is home. He does it in England, where the homeowner isn't allowed to own a gun, and wouldn't be allowed to do a damn thing even if he did catch the burglar. And when he does happen to get caught and arrested, the farking judge won't even lock him up.

That sounds like "Commit all the crimes you want, there is no risk". I can't see why any courage is needed.

notmtwain: Admit it. If there were no possible consequence, you would do it. Therefore, you are afraid of consequences and must be a coward.


I'm sure this will shock you, because you sound like a dishonest scumbag at heart, but some of us are honest.
 
2012-12-05 10:23:48 AM  
i141.photobucket.com
Robble Robble*


*APPROVES
 
2012-12-05 10:24:39 AM  

gerrymander: notmtwain: What's wrong with saying that it takes courage?

Only the entire context. It's not enough that a "courageous" person displays nerve, but must also do so in the face of knowing opposition. The nerve required to blindside someone -- as during a burglary, for example -- is a lower bar. It also has another word to describe it: "dastardly".

A burglar who phoned his intended victims up a day before and gave them time to prepare could be considered courageous -- and likely ineffectual.


Opposition is illegal in the UK. It's not hard to find examples where homeowners have defended themselves and their property against criminals, only for those same crooks to take them to court for injuries sustained, and win.
 
2012-12-05 10:24:45 AM  

had98c: courage - mental or moral strength to venture, persevere, and withstand danger, fear, or difficulty (according to m-w.com).


It takes a huge amount of courage to steal stuff when no one's around?
Danger: whar?
Fear: of what, being alone?
Difficulty: how hard is it to smash'n'grab?

Burglars are doing it because it's easy, not because it's a great challenge.
 
2012-12-05 10:35:43 AM  
This particular Judge is a tosser, completely deluded, and quite frankly should not sit on the bench. While I have no idea what the details are in the burglary case, calling a criminal's actions "courageous" is idiotic on its face. Giving a burglar a suspended jail sentence, also seems quite inappropriate, but again, we don't have the full details.

This is what happens when you guarantee judicial independence and give them a lifetime posting. I understand the benefits of judicial independence to society, but every now and then you get a tosser like this.

/Tosser!
 
2012-12-05 10:46:27 AM  

loki see loki do: With all due respect Litig8r ; )

"We have been the cowardssmart. Lobbing cruise missiles from two thousand miles away. That's cowardlysmart. Staying in the airplane when it hits the building. Say what you want about it. Not cowardlysmart."


Oh, I'm with you on that, I just couldn't resist the Maher quote.

I also wonder, within the context of religiously motivated suicide attacks, whether you can really even apply the concept or courage or cowardice. I mean, if you're religiously motivated enough to kill yourself for a cause, it's likely that you truly believe in salvation or some reward for your actions -- so when you kill yourself in the process of advancing your cause, you're not showing the same sort of courage as someone who doesn't believe in a reward/afterlife, etc.
 
2012-12-05 11:00:43 AM  

Litig8r: you're not showing the same sort of courage as someone who doesn't believe in a reward/afterlife, etc.


Um.. no. Atheists believe that you're exactly the same after death as you were before you were born. Unless you're terrified of losing conscious for many hours each night while you sleep, death should be no more scary. It's the theists that should be more afraid, as their belief system has the possibility that the afterlife might be unpleasant.
 
2012-12-05 11:05:12 AM  
notmtwain:

What's wrong with saying that it takes courage?

I challenge anyone who says it doesn't take courage to go do it.


Break into some redneck's house to steal his rebel-flag-stickered TV? You could get shot doing that: it's much easier to rob a bank.


Admit it. If there were no possible consequence, you would do it.

Actually if there were no possible consequences it wouldn't be a crime, technically speaking: it's the threat of retribution that separates licit from illict, not the nature of the act itself. E.g., chimpanzees also engage in "prostitution," i.e. the exchange of tat for tit, so it's perfectly natural behavior that only our species (and only certain parts of it) make an issue of; and then only to regulate the behavior of weaker members of society, i.e. to push people around for not being rich & powerful. (Who thinks people who were born in DC supply most of the customers for the city's escort services?) It's the desire to keep what's mine while getting your stuff from you that separates "stuff" into "property" in the first place: if everybody knows there's enough to go around and that it's equitably shared there's no reason to take your stuff.


Therefore, you are afraid of consequences and must be a coward.

I'm not going in some redneck's house to steal his iPad.


Have a nice day.

Wa `alaykumu s-salām.
 
2012-12-05 11:07:12 AM  

oldfarthenry: maxalt:

In my house your "huge amount of courage" would be splattered all over the walls and I would sue your estate for the clean-up costs and anything else I could dream up.

Be honest - you were doing curls with a 15 lb. free-weight while typing that - weren't you?


Only 15 pounds? I can do that and I'm a puny egghead.
 
2012-12-05 11:09:36 AM  
had98c:

courage - mental or moral strength to venture, persevere, and withstand danger, fear, or difficulty (according to m-w.com).

I'd say a burglar fits that definition (the mental strength, obviously not the moral, but it says OR).

The problem is that people seem to only want to assign courage to people doing good things. In the same manner that people assign cowardice to bad actions that aren't in fact cowardice. It just makes them feel smugly superior to assign that designation to actions they don't like.


You've read Nietzsche too, haven't you.
 
2012-12-05 11:20:51 AM  
Criminals do tend to have lower levels of fear and anxiety than the general population. It's part of the reason why they keep getting themselves in trouble. Of course, the word "courage" has too good a ring to it. It's better to use the word "poor awareness of the potential consequences of their actions". In the same vein, you cannot call them "resilient", you must say "failure to alter behavior in response to punishment and traumatic experience."
 
2012-12-05 11:27:29 AM  

The One True TheDavid: had98c:

courage - mental or moral strength to venture, persevere, and withstand danger, fear, or difficulty (according to m-w.com).

I'd say a burglar fits that definition (the mental strength, obviously not the moral, but it says OR).

The problem is that people seem to only want to assign courage to people doing good things. In the same manner that people assign cowardice to bad actions that aren't in fact cowardice. It just makes them feel smugly superior to assign that designation to actions they don't like.

You've read Nietzsche too, haven't you.


Actually I've never read anything by Nietzsche. But from what I've heard about him, his philosophy and mine do match up pretty well.
 
2012-12-05 11:28:36 AM  

gerrymander: notmtwain: What's wrong with saying that it takes courage?



A burglar who phoned his intended victims up a day before and gave them time to prepare could be considered courageous -- and likely ineffectual.


I think I know someone who begs to differ. 
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-12-05 11:34:08 AM  
There's a fine line between courage & stupidity.

There are no IQ tests for criminals.
 
2012-12-05 11:38:20 AM  

Frantic Freddie: There's a fine line between courage & stupidity.

There are no IQ tests for criminals.


Unless your house has a hedge maze. 

www.bellmaze.com
Look at all of those dumb burglars.
 
2012-12-05 12:02:47 PM  

notmtwain: What's wrong with saying that it takes courage?

I challenge anyone who says it doesn't take courage to go do it.

Admit it. If there were no possible consequence, you would do it. Therefore, you are afraid of consequences and must be a coward.

Have a nice day.


That's not a logical conclusion at all. I'm afraid of the consequences of running across a busy Boulevard when the "Don't Walk" sign is flashing. That doesn't make me a coward. It makes not a fool.
 
2012-12-05 12:03:22 PM  

gshepnyc: notmtwain: What's wrong with saying that it takes courage?

I challenge anyone who says it doesn't take courage to go do it.

Admit it. If there were no possible consequence, you would do it. Therefore, you are afraid of consequences and must be a coward.

Have a nice day.

That's not a logical conclusion at all. I'm afraid of the consequences of running across a busy Boulevard when the "Don't Walk" sign is flashing. That doesn't make me a coward. It makes me not a fool.


Ugh. FTFM
 
2012-12-05 12:19:09 PM  

Too_many_Brians: gerrymander: notmtwain: What's wrong with saying that it takes courage?



A burglar who phoned his intended victims up a day before and gave them time to prepare could be considered courageous -- and likely ineffectual.

I think I know someone who begs to differ. 
[upload.wikimedia.org image 300x450]


If Thomas Crowne wanted my TV and promised the full "Son of Man" routine, he could have it. The clowns in the article, not so much.
 
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