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(WTSP)   Not news: High school chemistry teacher asks students to bring in a substance from the Periodic Table of Elements. Fark: School gets locked down over a thermometer   (wtsp.com) divider line 195
    More: Florida, Seminole High School, Pinellas County Sheriff's Office, rapid transits, classical elements, Caught on Camera, teachers  
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13351 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Dec 2012 at 2:10 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-04 02:46:25 PM  
Imagine the shiatstorm if one of the kids found this in their basement and brought it in:

c414155.r55.cf1.rackcdn.com
 
2012-12-04 02:47:36 PM  
I brought in carbon. Well, It would have been carbon, but they wouldn't let me display how to separate it from C21H30O2 with fire
 
2012-12-04 02:50:06 PM  

gerbilpox: While we were taking a very tough Biology exam, our teacher dropped a chunk of sodium in a beaker of water. (Just for the lulz.) Did a hell of a lot more damage than a damned thermometer.


Could have done potassium, or if really crazy, cesium.
 
2012-12-04 02:50:36 PM  
Ermahgerd! Thermerhmetehr!

www.freakingnews.com
 
2012-12-04 02:51:53 PM  
I'm sure the kid who brought chlorine gas was especially popular.
 
2012-12-04 02:53:30 PM  

darth_badger: gerbilpox: While we were taking a very tough Biology exam, our teacher dropped a chunk of sodium in a beaker of water. (Just for the lulz.) Did a hell of a lot more damage than a damned thermometer.

It's better to teach the kids about sodium using that rock and roll music they like so much ...



BAAT MAAAAAAAN!
 
2012-12-04 02:53:33 PM  

brantgoose: Stupid Mercury.

Now I can't show the class my Polonium.


I showed my high school class my pole and got into a lot of trouble.
 
2012-12-04 02:53:46 PM  

Diogenes: Dancin_In_Anson: Jesus farking God. Government schooling at it's finest.

It's stupid, yes. But I fail to see why the "government" part was necessary or relevant. Public schools are hardly the only places with dopey, zero-tolerance policies and disproportionate, hysterical behavior.


And the disproportionate, hysterical behavior is only because clueless parents will get hysterical and file disproportionate lawsuits if they think that their snowflakes were exposed to (chose one, depending on locale) 1) environmental toxins 2) gummint mind-control chemicals.
 
2012-12-04 02:54:57 PM  
The mental picture of a hazmat crew in full suit carrying around a thermometer amuses me to no end. I don't care what the reasoning this is a perfect example of what we have been reduced to.
 
2012-12-04 02:55:06 PM  

Diogenes: Dancin_In_Anson: Jesus farking God. Government schooling at it's finest.

It's stupid, yes. But I fail to see why the "government" part was necessary or relevant. Public schools are hardly the only places with dopey, zero-tolerance policies and disproportionate, hysterical behavior.


yes but the 99% is pretty much forced to make their kids deal with these tards.
 
2012-12-04 02:55:58 PM  
Not toxic ? No problem... sodium metal chunk. Sure, it's reactive but not toxic.

Maybe a big hunk of natural Uranium ore would have been more fun ?
 
2012-12-04 02:56:23 PM  
Somebody ought to break an incandescent bulb just to watch the overreaction to mercury. They'll have to tear the whole school down and bring in new soil.
 
2012-12-04 02:58:58 PM  

Englebert Slaptyback: Fark: School gets locked down over a thermometer


They sound mercurial.


Not even close. Possibly the lamest pun ever
 
2012-12-04 03:00:17 PM  
it's a parallax you dig??
 
2012-12-04 03:00:18 PM  
... and in MY elementary school, the sixth-grade teacher handed us about a pint of mercury (no joke, thing weighed several pounds) and let us build mercury barometers. At least one of which broke in a shower of silvery droplets splattered across the classroom floor.

// and I wonder what became of the lithium D-cell battery I let my son take in for HIS "bring an element" excercise in fourth grade? It didn't come back home... someone must've gotten a surprise when they tried to put it in their flashlight.
 
2012-12-04 03:00:38 PM  
4.bp.blogspot.com 

Waaaahhhhhh gubbermint schkools! WAAAAHHHH!

Those foul Martians IMPOSED teh gubbermint on us FREEDUM loving Amurkans!!
 
2012-12-04 03:01:42 PM  

EddyKilowatt: Diogenes: Dancin_In_Anson: Jesus farking God. Government schooling at it's finest.

It's stupid, yes. But I fail to see why the "government" part was necessary or relevant. Public schools are hardly the only places with dopey, zero-tolerance policies and disproportionate, hysterical behavior.

And the disproportionate, hysterical behavior is only because clueless parents will get hysterical and file disproportionate lawsuits if they think that their snowflakes were exposed to (chose one, depending on locale) 1) environmental toxins 2) gummint mind-control chemicals.


Wasn't there a bunch of parents a while back who were upset because they said the wireless internet in the school was doing something to the kids' heads?
 
2012-12-04 03:06:05 PM  

hstein3: I'm sure the kid who brought chlorine gas was especially popular.


It's probably a good thing that I don't have any kids, because (thanks to eBay) I have samples of liquid elemental chlorine and bromine at home. They're quite safe because they're in sealed glass tubes inside a block of clear plastic, but I can only imagine how a modern "zero tolerance" school might react to them.
 
2012-12-04 03:08:51 PM  
I worked in a chemical plant as a young man and mercury was used in a process to strip unwanted chemicals from sodium hydroxide (drano). A guy used to steal the stuff in his thermos, then the next day he would bring coffee in the same thermos. I guess chemical worker aren't so bright, I am a shining example.
 
2012-12-04 03:09:27 PM  
No doubt in my mind now - the terrorists have won.
 
2012-12-04 03:09:37 PM  
I can just see men in hazmat suits pushing their way through dozens of people recoiling in horror from a scrawny kid holding a thermometer.
 
2012-12-04 03:11:59 PM  
 
2012-12-04 03:12:13 PM  

FarkinHostile: Not this shiat again...

Elemental mercury is NOT dangerous unless you go out of your way to make it so! You can farking drink it with little effect, hell, you can INJECT it and have only relatively minor problems. Breathing the vapors, on the other hand, can be a big problem, as can organic mercury compounds.

Mercury

Pay special attention to the section "Mercury as a Poison".


We played with it when I was a kid. Put it on dimes and quarters, made them really shiny (for awhile). It's not toxic. I wouldn't drink it, tho.
 
2012-12-04 03:16:42 PM  
Overreact in 3, 2, 1....
 
2012-12-04 03:17:33 PM  

notmtwain: UMTIR?

// unwanted mercury thermometer in rectum?

// Hey, don't shoot the messenger.


i236.photobucket.com
 
2012-12-04 03:19:12 PM  

urban.derelict: (Damn you, stoichiometry!)


deadhomersociety.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-12-04 03:19:20 PM  

EddyKilowatt: And the disproportionate, hysterical behavior is only because clueless parents will get hysterical and file disproportionate lawsuits if they think that their snowflakes were exposed to (chose one, depending on locale) 1) environmental toxins 2) gummint mind-control chemicals.

No.
The behavior has no reasoning beyond stupidity in almost all cases. Those that seek to later justify it use the lawsuit reasoning. That sort of behavior is the problem.
The behavior is rewarded by the brainless lumps of mass that we call "Judges" that allow those sorts of lawsuits.

Excusing it, justifying it, or supporting it, those are the problems that need to be dealt with.
 
2012-12-04 03:20:48 PM  

Inflatable Rhetoric: We played with it when I was a kid. Put it on dimes and quarters, made them really shiny (for awhile). It's not toxic. I wouldn't drink it, tho.


Well, it IS toxic, but it is very poorly absorbed both subcutaneously and via the gastrointestinal tract. Only when its vapors are inhaled or it is in organic form does it become a serious threat.

And if you had worms you'd be wise to drink it if no other cure was available.
 
2012-12-04 03:22:52 PM  
can't bring in Substance D either..

media.giantbomb.com
 
2012-12-04 03:24:17 PM  
3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-12-04 03:27:12 PM  

EddyKilowatt: And the disproportionate, hysterical behavior is only because clueless parents will get hysterical and file disproportionate lawsuits if they think that their snowflakes were exposed to (chose one, depending on locale) 1) environmental toxins 2) gummint mind-control chemicals.


I May Be Crazy But...: Wasn't there a bunch of parents a while back who were upset because they said the wireless internet in the school was doing something to the kids' heads?


Precisely why DIA's snide insert is off the mark. The real blame is on dumb parents who make it all but impossible to not have zero tolerance policies if only as a means to protect against litigation.
 
2012-12-04 03:28:28 PM  
Approves:

i759.photobucket.com

No one else before now? Farkers, I am disappoint.
 
2012-12-04 03:29:35 PM  
Hell I remember a few years ago someone spilled some in a high school in DC. The school was shut down for a year I think for the "clean up"
 
2012-12-04 03:30:21 PM  
assets.rollingstone.com 
Unavailable for comment.
 
2012-12-04 03:33:15 PM  
Please forgive me, as I now realize that between the mercury and lead D&D figures I had as a kid, I'd naively unraveled my destiny as the ultra-intelligent global leader of our new millennium and let you all down.

Sorry.
 
2012-12-04 03:33:47 PM  
This is hilarious.

In my day, we did experiments with mercury-filled manometers in chemistry class. For obvious reasons, they weren't completely sealed like thermometers. You just rely on the fact that a protective oxidized layer forms on undisturbed mercury.

Coolest application: super cheap observatory lenses created by taking a bowl of mercury and spinning it up to a constant speed. It forms a parabolic mirror surface, and once the surface is stable, it's safe. You just have to pump out the hazardous vapors that were created while it was being spun up.
 
2012-12-04 03:34:30 PM  
Just think what would've happened if you brought these:

greenremodelforum.com

OMG, it's a G-d D@mn terrorist attack
 
2012-12-04 03:35:04 PM  

AugieDoggyDaddy: In my junior high school physics class we had a beaker with about 2 inches of mercury for anybody to play with. Also had a baby in a jar.


lh5.googleusercontent.com

Nobody puts baby in a jar!
 
2012-12-04 03:35:05 PM  

ProfessorOhki: Tommy Moo: Jesus flipping Christ. I'm a chemist. I speak with authority: mercury is really not that toxic. Doctors used to prescribe it as a laxative. Granted, you don't want to be around if someone drops it on a stove, as inhaling the vapor can cause problems, but this school is completely buttfarking stupid. I could list a dozen things more toxic than mercury that are allowed in school.

Which isn't to say the assignment wasn't stupid. Literally "everything is from the periodic table."

Seriously, it'll just be 30 kids with aluminum cans and the one smartass who "brought nitrogen."


My high school had alpha, beta, and gamma sources in a random box in the back storage area of the physics classroom. Did my end of the year research project with them and a Geiger counter hooked up to a computer still running MS-DOS. Damn, I wish I could remember what isotopes they were.

/went to high school in the... whatever we're calling the 2000s, but this was a few short months before 9/11 so we were lauded instead.


(and for, in retrospect, a pretty lame experiment since all the data I really needed is just in certain reference books anyway, which I found out in college.

Anyway, doing some math or running a computer model simulation really isn't as fun as holding a gamma source in your hand, dammit. I realized that probably wasn't wise, but figured it was in a sample kit, couldn't be awful. I've gotten better.)
 
2012-12-04 03:35:52 PM  
Glad I decided at the last minute not to take that phial of uranium!

Seriously, this is so moronic. Elemental mercury is harmless. You can handle it with impunity for quite a long time. It is the mercuric oxides and methylated mercuric compounds that are dangerous. Elemental mercury readily oxidizes and there are several natural processes that will lead to its methylation, so it's a good idea not to have a lot of it sitting around the house. But a mercury thermometer is 100% safe. Even if it is broken, it doesn't contain enough mercury to worry about.

urban.derelict: until it touched my hs class ring and instantly stripped all the gold plating off of it


It didn't actually strip the gold off, but bound with it. You could have reclaimed it chemically via a number of reactions. But there would have been no way to get it back on the ring. Besides, those cheap, gold plated class rings had only a minuscule amount of gold on them.
 
2012-12-04 03:36:32 PM  
not related. but the stupidest day of high school physics was when our teacher brought in a concave mirror and went around the class going "LOOK IN THE MIRROR LOOK HOW BIG YOUR FACE IS"
 
2012-12-04 03:38:23 PM  

BarkingUnicorn: The school was locked down while admins checked out what else students brought, not just because of a mercury-filled thermometer. I'm disappointed that those kids couldn't find anything more hazardous in their homes.


Meat, sugar, gluten. The horror!
 
2012-12-04 03:38:48 PM  

PsyLord: Just think what would've happened if you brought these:

[greenremodelforum.com image 400x297]

OMG, it's a G-d D@mn terrorist attack


That reminds me, the person who had my job before me left a broken one of those in a box buried underneath a spare desk. Thanks, R, I just remembered I gotta look up how to deal with that now...

/to be fair, that out of sight out of mind trick is great, I've apparently forgotten about that for months myself
 
2012-12-04 03:38:59 PM  
Good thing I wasn't in Mrs. Curie's class.
depletedcranium.com
 
2012-12-04 03:40:22 PM  

moothemagiccow


Not even close. Possibly the lamest pun ever


From merriam-webster.com:

mer·cu·ri·al
adjective \(ˌ)mər-ˈkyur-ē-əl\
Definition of MERCURIAL
1
: of, relating to, or born under the planet Mercury
2
: having qualities of eloquence, ingenuity, or thievishness attributed to the god Mercury or to the influence of the planet Mercury
3
: characterized by rapid and unpredictable changeableness of mood
4
: of, relating to, containing, or caused by mercury



The school quickly got wound up and locked down over an insignificant amount of mercury, so both 3 and 4 are applicable.

Hey, look at that: you're wrong. Shut your word hole.
 
2012-12-04 03:42:46 PM  
I dropped a mercury thermometer at the doctor's office long ago when such devices were common. Until the nurse came in to clean it up, I had fun pushing the shiny metal balls across the floor and watch them absorb each other.

When I was working at a restaurant, another guy cleaned the kitchen floor with bleach, and when the floor drain was slow to clear, dumped a bunch of drano into it. A big cloud of green chlorine gas shot out of the drain, right in his face. IIRC we just took him outside to get fresh air until he could breathe again.

I remember our HS science teacher pouring sugar into sulfuric acid; he did it outside so the stink would disperse quickly, and it was easier to clean up the large mass of carbon liberated by the reaction.

I also worked on an AF base that tested missile and fighter engines. One building was a nuclear structure test room; inside a large ball of steel was a radiation source made from cobalt. I wonder if they would have let me bring that to school???
 
2012-12-04 03:44:13 PM  

I_Can't_Believe_it's_not_Boutros: I'd like to get one of those periodic tables. It would go great with my occasional chair.


Every now and then
 
2012-12-04 03:45:09 PM  
I brought my lithium.
 
2012-12-04 03:45:45 PM  

Burr: I brought in carbon.


How old was it?

/we are stardust
 
2012-12-04 03:46:54 PM  

Ratbert42: I brought my lithium.


I brought, um, a pencil. Carbon. Participation badge.

/vaguely thinking that we did have this assignment in elementary school or something
 
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