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(Reuters)   After 35 years, Voyager 1 is 11 billion miles away and has reached the end of the solar system. Boy, don't you wish NASA made cars?   ( reuters.com) divider line
    More: Followup, Voyager, NASA, Ed Stone, Supernova, American Geophysical Union  
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9833 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Dec 2012 at 11:48 AM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-05 12:56:16 AM  

saturn badger: JackieRabbit: It is transmitting radio signals. Radio signals and visible light are both regions on the electromagnetic spectrum. Both travel at the same velocity in a vacuum: 186,000 mi/sec.

What about a non-vacuum? Major difference in speed?


About the same difference as seeing lightning and hearing thunder.
 
2012-12-05 01:00:40 AM  

Raven Darke: ChipNASA: Biness: Apparently they're in the very early stages of developing a warp drive.


NASA is working on a faster than Light Warp Drive.
/rly?? Ya Rly!
//Clickypops

Oh yeah, the Alcubierre Drive.
According the estimates I've read on its energy requirements:
If you could convert matter to energy at 100% efficiency...
And you converted the entire rest mass of the known universe to energy...
You would still fall short of the required energy to run this drive...
By several orders of magnitude.

So a good idea, although impractical.
Basically it is a way to go FTL without breaking the laws of physics.
But at that level of energy, you can pretty much do as you damn well please.
Including rewriting the laws of physics and spawning new universes.


Someone didn't read the article:

"...if you adjust the shape of the ring surrounding the object, from something that looks like a flat halo into something thicker and curvier, you could power Alcubierre's warp drive with a mass roughly the size of NASA's Voyager 1 probe. (In other words: reduction in energy requirements from a planet with a mass equivalent to over 300 Earths, down to an object that weighs just under 1,600 pounds.) What's more, if you oscillate the space warp, White claims you could reduce the energy load even further."
 
2012-12-05 01:21:17 AM  

MaliFinn: saturn badger: JackieRabbit: It is transmitting radio signals. Radio signals and visible light are both regions on the electromagnetic spectrum. Both travel at the same velocity in a vacuum: 186,000 mi/sec.

What about a non-vacuum? Major difference in speed?

About the same difference as seeing lightning and hearing thunder.


Nice try.
 
2012-12-05 02:11:06 AM  

Biness: I love NASA so much. I wish we'd spend so much more on exploration. Apparently they're in the very early stages of developing a warp drive.


Not really.
More like they have an idea of how one might possibly work and they're conducting early tests of pieces of the underlying theory without building anything that might, even generously, be called a "warp drive".
 
2012-12-05 03:14:15 AM  
I liked voyager and tng but ds9 was the best Star Trek series by far. The acting and character development were superior by far, with only a handful of bad episodes (where as voyager and tng had many). Not to mention it had th best story archs of all the series.

/rewatched all of them on Netflix recently, in order.
//every ds9 episode was worth watching, even the bad ones.
///currently watching Enterprise - which I hated when it was on the air. It's not as bad as I remember. It's biggest downfall was Scott bakula I think. Terrible actor.
 
2012-12-05 05:15:24 AM  
This is our Milky Way Galaxy (wikipedia) (Artist's rendering, of course):

Our Sun is circled in the image. In fact, our entire solar system fits in that circle. In 35 years, while moving at 35,791 mph (57,600 km/h), traversing 11 billion miles, Voyager 1 hasn't even left that circle. In fact, travelling at the speed of light for over 100 years, the very first radio transmissions haven't escaped that circle. And if somehow intelligent life on the opposite side of the galaxy had a telescope and could see the Earth in super fine detail, the light from the earliest man won't have reached them yet. That's our galaxy. And the universe is full of galaxies. I marvel at just how small we truly are.

/not intended to be depressing
 
2012-12-05 06:25:56 AM  

Gawdzila: Biness: I love NASA so much. I wish we'd spend so much more on exploration. Apparently they're in the very early stages of developing a warp drive.

Not really.
More like they have an idea of how one might possibly work and they're conducting early tests of pieces of the underlying theory without building anything that might, even generously, be called a "warp drive".


"very early stages"
 
2012-12-05 07:13:11 AM  

Biness: Gawdzila: Biness: I love NASA so much. I wish we'd spend so much more on exploration. Apparently they're in the very early stages of developing a warp drive.

Not really.
More like they have an idea of how one might possibly work and they're conducting early tests of pieces of the underlying theory without building anything that might, even generously, be called a "warp drive".

"very early stages"


Yeah. By that standard, I'm in the very early stages of becoming the supreme ruler of the entire Earth and making all women my personal concubines.
 
2012-12-05 08:32:46 AM  

WhiskeyBoy: Our Sun is circled in the image. In fact, our entire solar system fits in that circle. In 35 years, while moving at 35,791 mph (57,600 km/h), traversing 11 billion miles, Voyager 1 hasn't even left that circle. In fact, travelling at the speed of light for over 100 years, the very first radio transmissions haven't escaped that circle. And if somehow intelligent life on the opposite side of the galaxy had a telescope and could see the Earth in super fine detail, the light from the earliest man won't have reached them yet. That's our galaxy. And the universe is full of galaxies. I marvel at just how small we truly are.


That's really interesting, and that is why I have always thought that aliens haven't visited earth. I mean if our radio signals have barely gotten out of our own neighboorhood. So if that is the case how would aliens find us, other than total randomness. And considering there are billions of planets in the galaxy, with huge distances between them aliens finding us randomly would be nearly impossible.
 
2012-12-05 08:46:31 AM  

WhiskeyBoy: This is our Milky Way Galaxy (wikipedia) (Artist's rendering, of course):

Our Sun is circled in the image. In fact, our entire solar system fits in that circle. In 35 years, while moving at 35,791 mph (57,600 km/h), traversing 11 billion miles, Voyager 1 hasn't even left that circle. In fact, travelling at the speed of light for over 100 years, the very first radio transmissions haven't escaped that circle. And if somehow intelligent life on the opposite side of the galaxy had a telescope and could see the Earth in super fine detail, the light from the earliest man won't have reached them yet. That's our galaxy. And the universe is full of galaxies. I marvel at just how small we truly are.

/not intended to be depressing


So that's the Alpha quadrant.
 
2012-12-05 09:16:53 AM  

WhiskeyBoy: This is our Milky Way Galaxy (wikipedia) (Artist's rendering, of course):

Our Sun is circled in the image. In fact, our entire solar system fits in that circle. In 35 years, while moving at 35,791 mph (57,600 km/h), traversing 11 billion miles, Voyager 1 hasn't even left that circle. In fact, travelling at the speed of light for over 100 years, the very first radio transmissions haven't escaped that circle. And if somehow intelligent life on the opposite side of the galaxy had a telescope and could see the Earth in super fine detail, the light from the earliest man won't have reached them yet. That's our galaxy. And the universe is full of galaxies. I marvel at just how small we truly are.

/not intended to be depressing


Actually, it's worse than that: Most high powered radio transmissions before WWII were relatively low frequency, and they were reflected back to Earth by the ionosphere. It wasn't until WWII that we started transmitting high power on frequencies in the "microwave window":

upload.wikimedia.org

So it's only been about 70 years, realistically.

That's not to say it's not possible, though: There are something like 1,400 star systems within 50 light years of our system, containing 2,000 stars, and the evidence seems to be that planets are common enough.
 
2012-12-05 11:56:42 AM  

Waxing_Chewbacca: That's impossible


No it's not. You just cut the corners. It's called cheating and some people brag about it.
 
2012-12-05 04:10:24 PM  

Biness: Gawdzila: Biness: I love NASA so much. I wish we'd spend so much more on exploration. Apparently they're in the very early stages of developing a warp drive.

Not really.
More like they have an idea of how one might possibly work and they're conducting early tests of pieces of the underlying theory without building anything that might, even generously, be called a "warp drive".

"very early stages"


Yeah, I still don't think that's an accurate way to characterize it. Testing pieces of physical theory is not the same as developing technologies that might come from them. By that logic, James Clerk Maxwell was in the very early stages of developing radio and television.
 
2012-12-05 04:41:08 PM  
Got a 1970 truck w/430,000

Damn good record
 
2012-12-05 11:32:37 PM  

SirEattonHogg: I dont get the hate for Voyager...


img15.imageshack.us 

Any questions?
 
2012-12-06 12:13:10 AM  
Wouldn't it be hilarious if the probe bumped into the inside wall of a big sphere? What if our solar system was the setting for a reality show watched by the gods... a much larger-scale version of The Truman Show? Hell, they could be sitting in a bar right now, running a betting pool on when the probe is going to bang into the wall.
 
2012-12-06 09:43:26 PM  

Gawdzila: Biness: I love NASA so much. I wish we'd spend so much more on exploration. Apparently they're in the very early stages of developing a warp drive.

Not really.
More like they have an idea of how one might possibly work and they're conducting early tests of pieces of the underlying theory without building anything that might, even generously, be called a "warp drive".


To make apple pie from scratch, you must first build the universe ~Carl Sagan

By all means, pray for rain. But dig a well while you're doing it.~Some Guy
 
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