Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Reuters)   After 35 years, Voyager 1 is 11 billion miles away and has reached the end of the solar system. Boy, don't you wish NASA made cars?   (reuters.com) divider line 167
    More: Followup, Voyager, NASA, Ed Stone, Supernova, American Geophysical Union  
•       •       •

9820 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Dec 2012 at 11:48 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



167 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2012-12-04 05:58:50 AM  
My car has over 449,000 kms on the clock and still going strong.

I'm on the way back from the moon Alice!

/Subaru ftw
//go Voyager!!1!
 
2012-12-04 06:05:12 AM  
Holy cow. Go NASA
 
2012-12-04 07:26:16 AM  
i76.photobucket.com
 
2012-12-04 08:22:01 AM  
If NASA made cars, they'd cost $1Bn. When something breaks, you won't be able to fix or replace it, instead an engineer will write ten-thousand new lines of code to program some other part on your car to do the job instead. It'll be solar powered, and the body will have the same sexy curves you might see on a brick.
 
2012-12-04 09:01:39 AM  

t3knomanser: It'll be solar powered, and the body will have the same sexy curves you might see on a brick.


Most likely it would look like the fuselage of the space shuttle, with a bumper sticker that reads "Thermal tile broke, watch for explosion"
 
2012-12-04 09:04:40 AM  
Wake me up when it hits the ort cloud.
 
2012-12-04 09:15:13 AM  
It's a great big universe and we're all small and puny.
 
2012-12-04 09:25:14 AM  
Don't you hear my call
Though you're many years away
Don't you hear me calling you
Write your letters in the sand
For the day I take your hand
In the land that our grandchildren knew

See you out there, V'ger.
 
2012-12-04 09:26:50 AM  
subby is a commie
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-12-04 09:47:45 AM  
You really have to fiddle with the radio knob on one of them to get any reception. And don't even think about Pandora unless you enjoy 10 bit per second mp3 quality.
 
2012-12-04 10:18:42 AM  
I wish they had a bumper sticker on it.

"If found, please return to Earth, Sol System...NO REWARD"

/You don't want to offer a reward to aliens, they may think we have a lot more
 
2012-12-04 11:34:03 AM  
i212.photobucket.com
 
2012-12-04 11:48:15 AM  

SnarfVader: [i212.photobucket.com image 368x500]


So, the caption in the picture is wrong and it didn't really exit the solar system back in 1990?
 
2012-12-04 11:52:24 AM  
i222.photobucket.com
 
2012-12-04 11:52:46 AM  
He's probably waiting for Voyager, with his uranium Q38 explosive space modulator.

poietes.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-12-04 11:53:23 AM  

Mark Ratner: SnarfVader: [i212.photobucket.com image 368x500]

So, the caption in the picture is wrong and it didn't really exit the solar system back in 1990?


The definition of "exit the solar system" has been getting revised based on the Voyager probes. There's "out past the last planet," then there's "so far away the sun's own 'wind' is overcome by outside forces."

It's getting damn close to the latter, which is what makes it so amazing. We have had precious little idea about what it's like once you hit the heliopause.
 
2012-12-04 11:53:51 AM  
funny how we make cars to last only about 1ook miles, but a semi can last over a million.
 
2012-12-04 11:53:59 AM  
Voyager > DS9
 
2012-12-04 11:54:45 AM  
www.newstrekker.com
He'll figure it out. We'll be fine, let's just wait.
 
2012-12-04 11:55:48 AM  
Subby wants a car that you add water to to make a sweet, orange-tasting beverage?
 
2012-12-04 11:57:39 AM  

Bit'O'Gristle: funny how we make cars to last only about 1ook miles, but a semi can last over a million.


There's a huge difference in the kinds of miles traveled. Most semi tractors spend their time out on the highway at constant speed. That's much kinder to the equipment than constant acceleration, braking, and turning that one finds in more urbanized areas. Diesel engines also tend to be longer lived than their gasoline powered counterparts. Furthermore, a vehicle maintained with great interest by the user (when it earns your paycheck, you pay close attention to problems) is always going to last longer than one where the user pays no attention to the trouble light that looks like a little oil lamp.
 
2012-12-04 11:58:59 AM  

Makh: It's a great big universe and we're all small and puny.


We're just tiny little specks about the size of Mickey Rooney!
 
2012-12-04 11:59:01 AM  
webodysseum.com
 
2012-12-04 12:00:54 PM  

Bit'O'Gristle: funny how we make cars to last only about 1ook miles, but a semi can last over a million.


The fact that they both have wheels is about all that those two vehicles have in common...
 
2012-12-04 12:02:18 PM  

Mark Ratner: SnarfVader: [i212.photobucket.com image 368x500]

So, the caption in the picture is wrong and it didn't really exit the solar system back in 1990?


ftfa:
"Voyager 1 hit the outer sphere of the solar system, a region called the heliosphere, in 2004 and passed into the heliosheath, where the supersonic stream of particles from the sun - the so-called "solar wind" - slowed down and became turbulent.

That phase of the journey lasted for 5.5 years. Then the solar wind stopped moving and the magnetic field strengthened.

Based on an instrument that measures charged particles, Voyager entered the magnetic highway on July 28, 2012. The region was in flux for about a month and stabilized on Aug. 25"

So there are different degrees of "out of the solar system". It took 18 years to get beyond Solar winds and the path of excited particals from other sources. That's one heck of a boundry, very cool!
 
2012-12-04 12:02:21 PM  
I'd like to see a few more deep space probes sent out. Seeing that those probes are 35 years old and weren't meant for interstellar studies, It be interesting to see what type of info new ones could send back

/I said probe...giggity.
 
2012-12-04 12:03:34 PM  

chewielouie: Voyager > DS9


images2.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2012-12-04 12:04:17 PM  
Boy, don't you wish NASA made cars had a larger budget?

Yes.
 
2012-12-04 12:04:17 PM  

akula: Mark Ratner: SnarfVader: [i212.photobucket.com image 368x500]

So, the caption in the picture is wrong and it didn't really exit the solar system back in 1990?

The definition of "exit the solar system" has been getting revised based on the Voyager probes. There's "out past the last planet," then there's "so far away the sun's own 'wind' is overcome by outside forces."

It's getting damn close to the latter, which is what makes it so amazing. We have had precious little idea about what it's like once you hit the heliopause.


True. The definition of the outside of the solar system is constantly evolving. That picture was made a while ago and we've learned so much since the late 90's/ early 00's. I still think it's an amazing picture, despite the caption.
 
2012-12-04 12:04:28 PM  

Bit'O'Gristle: funny how we make cars to last only about 1ook miles, but a semi can last over a million.


Semis are measured in minutes, not miles.
 
2012-12-04 12:04:36 PM  
I believe it refers to itself as VGER now


/Lt. ILIA was teh hawt
 
2012-12-04 12:05:44 PM  
www.allpar.com

what a voyager may look like.


I love NASA so much. I wish we'd spend so much more on exploration. Apparently they're in the very early stages of developing a warp drive.
 
2012-12-04 12:05:56 PM  
Thankfully I will long dead when it returns.
 
2012-12-04 12:07:06 PM  

j__z: I'd like to see a few more deep space probes sent out. Seeing that those probes are 35 years old and weren't meant for interstellar studies, It be interesting to see what type of info new ones could send back

/I said probe...giggity.


Also, could we send one out these days with better propulsion technology that would move it out that far in less time? Does NASA have any stuff like that they are testing right now? what's the deal...
 
2012-12-04 12:07:14 PM  

occamswrist: Bit'O'Gristle: funny how we make cars to last only about 1ook miles, but a semi can last over a million.

Semis are measured in minutes, not miles.


perhaps thats why Han said the Millennium Falcon made the kessel run in less than 12 parsecs
 
2012-12-04 12:07:32 PM  
i misread this as "galaxy" instead of "solar system". man this is so gay..
 
2012-12-04 12:07:47 PM  
Subby, needs a 240 Volvo wagon.
 
2012-12-04 12:07:48 PM  

germ78: Boy, don't you wish NASA made cars had a larger budget?

Yes.


Agreed.
 
2012-12-04 12:08:03 PM  

Headso: j__z: I'd like to see a few more deep space probes sent out. Seeing that those probes are 35 years old and weren't meant for interstellar studies, It be interesting to see what type of info new ones could send back

/I said probe...giggity.

Also, could we send one out these days with better propulsion technology that would move it out that far in less time? Does NASA have any stuff like that they are testing right now? what's the deal...


i think New Horizons was designed for the Kuiper belt and beyond, once pluto is passed.
 
2012-12-04 12:08:04 PM  

Biness: [www.allpar.com image 576x129]

what a voyager may look like.


I love NASA so much. I wish we'd spend so much more on exploration. Apparently they're in the very early stages of developing a warp drive.


Your gif isn't working. Must be hot.
 
2012-12-04 12:08:07 PM  

basemetal: Wake me up when it hits the ort cloud.


If you know what it is, they you Oort to know how it's spelled.
 
2012-12-04 12:08:57 PM  

SnarfVader: Biness: [www.allpar.com image 576x129]

what a voyager may look like.


I love NASA so much. I wish we'd spend so much more on exploration. Apparently they're in the very early stages of developing a warp drive.

Your gif isn't working. Must be hot.


not a gif. just a jpeg. and hot as blazes. as hot as voyager is cold.

/its lonely out in space
 
2012-12-04 12:10:40 PM  

Bit'O'Gristle: funny how we make cars to last only about 1ook miles, but a semi can last over a million.


It's weird how rocks can last for millions of yeas but trees only last for century or two.

Apples to oranges.

1st - you're talking about diesels engines, which are simpler and over-built to handle the stress and of diesel combustion. Likewsie, the car is often overbuilt around the engine.

2nd - One is designed for handling, roominess, and ride comfort, the other is designed to haul stuff.

3rd - Most of those trucks receive constant maintenance.

4th - Cost. Obviously price ranges vary..but I've heard that $60,000 is the starting point with some of the nicer (newer) ones being $100,000+. Which is why they receive constant maintenance...it's cheaper to put money into maintenance every year than it is to buy a new truck. Especially when it costs so much to buy a new truck.

It's not that cars can't be made to last that long..it's that after 5-10 years..most people want to go out an get a new model.
 
2012-12-04 12:11:21 PM  

Okieboy: I believe it refers to itself as VGER now


/Lt. ILIA was teh hawt


Yeah, but her vow of celibacy was on record.

No boldly going there, sadly.
 
2012-12-04 12:11:28 PM  
Hey subby, your car could make it that far if it was accelerated to escape velocity and allowed to travel in a frictionless environment too.
 
2012-12-04 12:12:19 PM  

Biness: SnarfVader: Biness: [www.allpar.com image 576x129]

what a voyager may look like.


I love NASA so much. I wish we'd spend so much more on exploration. Apparently they're in the very early stages of developing a warp drive.

Your gif isn't working. Must be hot.

not a gif. just a jpeg. and hot as blazes. as hot as voyager is cold.

/its lonely out in space


i212.photobucket.com

You meant this?
 
2012-12-04 12:12:52 PM  

Biness: i think New Horizons was designed for the Kuiper belt and beyond, once pluto is passed.


Yeah, if they can find an object close enough to its trajectory to study. Last I heard, they hadn't identified any.
 
2012-12-04 12:13:02 PM  

SnarfVader: [i212.photobucket.com image 368x500]


While Voyager has long ago move beyond the planetary zone of our solar system, it has not technically left the solar system itself. It is currently in the heliosphere. Since the exact size of the heliosphere and the exact location of the heliopause (the edge) is not precisely known, no one knew exactly when Voyager would enter interstellar space. Voyager passed through the termination shock in 2004 and it was estimated that it would need 10 more years to reach the heliopause. Voyager has instruments on board to study the gravitational effects of the strong solar wind in this zone. One of the goals is to get a better map of the heliosphere.

/source NASA
 
2012-12-04 12:13:07 PM  

Biness: occamswrist: Bit'O'Gristle: funny how we make cars to last only about 1ook miles, but a semi can last over a million.

Semis are measured in minutes, not miles.

perhaps thats why Han said the Millennium Falcon made the kessel run in less than 12 parsecs


That's impossible
 
2012-12-04 12:13:32 PM  
I turned off my TV so I could read this article without distractions.
I dont know much,But I know that Voyagers journey is a marvell that almost defies description.Part of me envies the things it will see over the next several hundred thousand years and part of me feels a bit forlorn that there may be no one left on Earth to share in its discoveries.
 
2012-12-04 12:14:07 PM  

JackieRabbit: SnarfVader: [i212.photobucket.com image 368x500]

While Voyager has long ago move beyond the planetary zone of our solar system, it has not technically left the solar system itself. It is currently in the heliosphere. Since the exact size of the heliosphere and the exact location of the heliopause (the edge) is not precisely known, no one knew exactly when Voyager would enter interstellar space. Voyager passed through the termination shock in 2004 and it was estimated that it would need 10 more years to reach the heliopause. Voyager has instruments on board to study the gravitational effects of the strong solar wind in this zone. One of the goals is to get a better map of the heliosphere.

/source NASA


aka Read the rest of the thread where I acknowledge the caption is incorrect, but the picture is cool.
 
2012-12-04 12:14:25 PM  

Bit'O'Gristle: funny how we make cars to last only about 1ook miles, but a semi can last over a million.


A new semi with trailer costs as much as a house.
 
2012-12-04 12:14:59 PM  

JackieRabbit: SnarfVader: [i212.photobucket.com image 368x500]

While Voyager has long ago move beyond the planetary zone of our solar system, it has not technically left the solar system itself. It is currently in the heliosphere. Since the exact size of the heliosphere and the exact location of the heliopause (the edge) is not precisely known, no one knew exactly when Voyager would enter interstellar space. Voyager passed through the termination shock in 2004 and it was estimated that it would need 10 more years to reach the heliopause. Voyager has instruments on board to study the gravitational effects of the strong solar wind in this zone. One of the goals is to get a better map of the heliosphere.

/source NASA


its on the magnetic highway now....ON THE GREAT SPACE COASTER!
 
2012-12-04 12:15:50 PM  

Fark Rye For Many Whores: chewielouie: Voyager > DS9

[images2.wikia.nocookie.net image 292x249]


That man is bat shiat crazy today. Spent too much time with the prophets me thinks.
 
2012-12-04 12:17:56 PM  

Waxing_Chewbacca: Biness: occamswrist: Bit'O'Gristle: funny how we make cars to last only about 1ook miles, but a semi can last over a million.

Semis are measured in minutes, not miles.

perhaps thats why Han said the Millennium Falcon made the kessel run in less than 12 parsecs

That's impossible


I've outrun Imperial starships. Not the local bulk cruisers mind you, I'm talking about the big Corellian ships now. She's fast enough for you old man. What's the cargo?
 
2012-12-04 12:18:17 PM  

SnarfVader: True. The definition of the outside of the solar system is constantly evolving. That picture was made a while ago and we've learned so much since the late 90's/ early 00's. I still think it's an amazing picture, despite the caption.


Indeed.

The earth is (rather literally) our whole world; to have an outside picture of it looking so small is quite the mind bender.

This stuff is why I like astronomy; there's so much out there to learn and explore, and we know so little. We even need to make scientific breakthroughs on the order of Newton and Einstein (or even more so) in order to get out there and keep on learning. Humbling, yet so awe inspiring.
 
2012-12-04 12:18:54 PM  
I think the most amazing thing is that its transmitter has enough power to get a readable signal all the way back to Earth.
 
2012-12-04 12:20:36 PM  

SuddenlySamhain: I turned off my TV so I could read this article without distractions.
I dont know much,But I know that Voyagers journey is a marvell that almost defies description.Part of me envies the things it will see over the next several hundred thousand years and part of me feels a bit forlorn that there may be no one left on Earth to share in its discoveries.


Better turn it back on before the Handicapper General, Diana Moon Glampers, finds out.
 
2012-12-04 12:20:53 PM  

Biness: JackieRabbit: SnarfVader: [i212.photobucket.com image 368x500]

While Voyager has long ago move beyond the planetary zone of our solar system, it has not technically left the solar system itself. It is currently in the heliosphere. Since the exact size of the heliosphere and the exact location of the heliopause (the edge) is not precisely known, no one knew exactly when Voyager would enter interstellar space. Voyager passed through the termination shock in 2004 and it was estimated that it would need 10 more years to reach the heliopause. Voyager has instruments on board to study the gravitational effects of the strong solar wind in this zone. One of the goals is to get a better map of the heliosphere.

/source NASA

its on the magnetic highway now....ON THE GREAT SPACE COASTER!


data.whicdn.com
Great to see ya! We're gonna have a great jump today!

/rip it roll it and punch it!
//in SPACE!
 
2012-12-04 12:22:06 PM  

t3knomanser: It'll be solar powered


No, it would be powered by RTG, and travel at a scorching speed of 0.5mph. It would also look rather like a centaur version of that robot from the movie "Short Circuit".

akula: The definition of "exit the solar system" has been getting revised based on the Voyager probes. There's "out past the last planet," then there's "so far away the sun's own 'wind' is overcome by outside forces."


There is no strict definition, and never was. The Sun's Hill sphere extends out past one light-year, well beyond the heliopause. There could very well be a Mars-sized planet orbiting the Sun one-quarter of the way to Proxima Centauri and we'd have no way to detect it (with current technology, anyway).

Voyager 1 has reached the end of the heliosphere, but that's not the only boundary. NASA has rather badly miscommunicated this, in my opinion, but the reason why Voyager 1's discovery is significant isn't that it's reached the edge of the Sun's influence. It hasn't; it's still affected by the Sun's gravity. What's exciting is that being there is the only way to research this part of space. It's not just there; the findings have re-written our entire chapter on the heliosphere and heliopause.
 
2012-12-04 12:22:08 PM  
That's not the Creator, V'ger. That's my mom. There's a difference.
 
2012-12-04 12:22:09 PM  

Biness: Waxing_Chewbacca: Biness: occamswrist: Bit'O'Gristle: funny how we make cars to last only about 1ook miles, but a semi can last over a million.

Semis are measured in minutes, not miles.

perhaps thats why Han said the Millennium Falcon made the kessel run in less than 12 parsecs

That's impossible

I've outrun Imperial starships. Not the local bulk cruisers mind you, I'm talking about the big Corellian ships now. She's fast enough for you old man. What's the cargo?


Your mom and the load I dumped in her last night

/ makes for a bit of a different film, doesn't it
 
2012-12-04 12:22:42 PM  

basemetal: Wake me up when it hits the ort cloud.


Given that it's 17 light hours from Earth, which means it might as well be 17 light hours from the Sun, it's already well past the Kupier Belt (~7 light hours for the outer boundary), and it's actually well within the possible inner boundary of the Oort cloud since it's already gone well past what few possible Oort cloud member candidates we know of.
 
2012-12-04 12:22:53 PM  

dittybopper: Biness: i think New Horizons was designed for the Kuiper belt and beyond, once pluto is passed.

Yeah, if they can find an object close enough to its trajectory to study. Last I heard, they hadn't identified any.


I thought they just hadn't decided yet in part because that leg of the program isn't funded yet.
 
2012-12-04 12:23:56 PM  
images2.wikia.nocookie.net

Voyager 1 is officially lost.
 
2012-12-04 12:24:41 PM  

Waxing_Chewbacca: Biness: Waxing_Chewbacca: Biness: occamswrist: Bit'O'Gristle: funny how we make cars to last only about 1ook miles, but a semi can last over a million.

Semis are measured in minutes, not miles.

perhaps thats why Han said the Millennium Falcon made the kessel run in less than 12 parsecs

That's impossible

I've outrun Imperial starships. Not the local bulk cruisers mind you, I'm talking about the big Corellian ships now. She's fast enough for you old man. What's the cargo?

Your mom and the load I dumped in her last night

/ makes for a bit of a different film, doesn't it


wow. yea, thats just unpleasant.
 
2012-12-04 12:25:16 PM  
Evil aliens will find it and come to earth to eat us. Stupid records they put in it.
 
2012-12-04 12:25:24 PM  

dragonchild: There could very well be a Mars-sized planet orbiting the Sun one-quarter of the way to Proxima Centauri and we'd have no way to detect it (with current technology, anyway).


Honestly, there could be a planet bigger than Jupiter out there. Some controversial theories do propose such a planet. However, the WISE might be able to detect it if it were in the right spot because its temperature should be above background.
 
2012-12-04 12:27:14 PM  

Deep Contact: Evil aliens will find it and come to earth to eat us. Stupid records they put in it.


Ah, you're just mad because your garage band didn't make the cut.
 
2012-12-04 12:28:03 PM  

Biness: Waxing_Chewbacca: Biness: Waxing_Chewbacca: Biness: occamswrist: Bit'O'Gristle: funny how we make cars to last only about 1ook miles, but a semi can last over a million.

Semis are measured in minutes, not miles.

perhaps thats why Han said the Millennium Falcon made the kessel run in less than 12 parsecs

That's impossible

I've outrun Imperial starships. Not the local bulk cruisers mind you, I'm talking about the big Corellian ships now. She's fast enough for you old man. What's the cargo?

Your mom and the load I dumped in her last night

/ makes for a bit of a different film, doesn't it

wow. yea, thats just unpleasant.


I LOLed.
 
2012-12-04 12:28:13 PM  

Biness: Waxing_Chewbacca: Biness: Waxing_Chewbacca: Biness: occamswrist: Bit'O'Gristle: funny how we make cars to last only about 1ook miles, but a semi can last over a million.

Semis are measured in minutes, not miles.

perhaps thats why Han said the Millennium Falcon made the kessel run in less than 12 parsecs

That's impossible

I've outrun Imperial starships. Not the local bulk cruisers mind you, I'm talking about the big Corellian ships now. She's fast enough for you old man. What's the cargo?

Your mom and the load I dumped in her last night

/ makes for a bit of a different film, doesn't it

wow. yea, thats just unpleasant.


It certainly makes Leia's line "You came in that thing? You're braver than I thought" more trenchant.
 
2012-12-04 12:28:31 PM  

Biness: Apparently they're in the very early stages of developing a warp drive.



NASA is working on a faster than Light Warp Drive.
/rly?? Ya Rly!
//Clickypops
 
2012-12-04 12:28:45 PM  

JackieRabbit: Deep Contact: Evil aliens will find it and come to earth to eat us. Stupid records they put in it.

Ah, you're just mad because your garage band didn't make the cut.


In a Saturday Night Live segment ("Next Week in Review") in episode 64 of the show's third season, Steve Martin's character, a psychic named Cocuwa, predicts that the cover of Time Magazine for the upcoming week will show the four words "Send more Chuck Berry," which had supposedly been sent from extraterrestrials to Earth the week before
 
2012-12-04 12:30:06 PM  

dittybopper: Biness: Waxing_Chewbacca: Biness: Waxing_Chewbacca: Biness: occamswrist: Bit'O'Gristle: funny how we make cars to last only about 1ook miles, but a semi can last over a million.

Semis are measured in minutes, not miles.

perhaps thats why Han said the Millennium Falcon made the kessel run in less than 12 parsecs

That's impossible

I've outrun Imperial starships. Not the local bulk cruisers mind you, I'm talking about the big Corellian ships now. She's fast enough for you old man. What's the cargo?

Your mom and the load I dumped in her last night

/ makes for a bit of a different film, doesn't it

wow. yea, thats just unpleasant.

It certainly makes Leia's line "You came in that thing? You're braver than I thought" more trenchant.


and Han's classic, "i don't care what you smell, get in there" and of course "I thought they smelled bad on the outside"
 
2012-12-04 12:31:08 PM  

ChipNASA: Biness: Apparently they're in the very early stages of developing a warp drive.


NASA is working on a faster than Light Warp Drive.
/rly?? Ya Rly!
//Clickypops


i know it may not happen in my lifetime, but i hope to God it does.
 
2012-12-04 12:34:07 PM  

dittybopper: Biness: Waxing_Chewbacca: Biness: Waxing_Chewbacca: Biness: occamswrist: Bit'O'Gristle: funny how we make cars to last only about 1ook miles, but a semi can last over a million.

Semis are measured in minutes, not miles.

perhaps thats why Han said the Millennium Falcon made the kessel run in less than 12 parsecs

That's impossible

I've outrun Imperial starships. Not the local bulk cruisers mind you, I'm talking about the big Corellian ships now. She's fast enough for you old man. What's the cargo?

Your mom and the load I dumped in her last night

/ makes for a bit of a different film, doesn't it

wow. yea, thats just unpleasant.

It certainly makes Leia's line "You came in that thing? You're braver than I thought" more trenchant.


Ha!!!! Perfect
 
2012-12-04 12:34:36 PM  

dittybopper: Yeah, if they can find an object close enough to its trajectory to study. Last I heard, they hadn't identified any.


No official announcements (which would be stupid when the probe is still en route to its primary destination), but there are targets:
http://www.icehunters.org/

With all available resources focusing on the one-shot take that is Pluto, there'll be plenty of time later to go through the KBO list.
 
2012-12-04 12:35:58 PM  

chewielouie: Voyager > DS9


Oooo look! A Trek troll!

"Voyager" was horrid, or at least, horrid for as long as I held my nose and watched it.

It violated one of the cardinal rules of Trek regarding technology (Don't introduce cool new tech then largely ignore it - e.g. 'biocomputer systems').

It had a central Captain who had the charm and charsima of unpainted drywall.

Its worst offense, however, was one you had to live through to appreciate. There was absolutely no NEED or POINT to the show being created in the first place.

Paramount: 'We are cancelling TNG'
Masses: HOWL!
Paramount: "But-um... we are doing a NEW show to replace it. Sort of."
Massess: WTF? Why not just re-fresh the TNG franchise with a new crew?
Paramount: ......
 
2012-12-04 12:37:15 PM  

Mark Ratner: SnarfVader: [i212.photobucket.com image 368x500]

So, the caption in the picture is wrong and it didn't really exit the solar system back in 1990?


media.tumblr.com
 
2012-12-04 12:38:07 PM  
images.whatmap.multiply.com

'Well, bye.'
 
2012-12-04 12:39:41 PM  
How much better off would our world be if this received the media attention nonsense like the Petreus scandal gets? One can only imagine...
 
2012-12-04 12:40:41 PM  
Does this story hold the record for most times posted on Fark?
 
2012-12-04 12:41:06 PM  

ChipNASA: Biness: Apparently they're in the very early stages of developing a warp drive.


NASA is working on a faster than Light Warp Drive.
/rly?? Ya Rly!
//Clickypops


Um yea, about that.....
imageshack.us
 
2012-12-04 12:41:54 PM  

SuddenlySamhain: I turned off my TV so I could read this article without distractions.
I dont know much,But I know that Voyagers journey is a marvell that almost defies description.Part of me envies the things it will see over the next several hundred thousand years and part of me feels a bit forlorn that there may be no one left on Earth to share in its discoveries.


The Voyagers wouldn't have the power to transmit any data back after that kind of time. The cameras (and many other instruments) are already non-functional. Since the probes weren't meant for this kind of endurance, they're only managing to function by selectively shutting down various systems to save power. At some point in the not-very-distant future, there won't be enough juice left to power even the core systems, and the probes will go dark, just like the Pioneer probes (which also are exiting the solar system, but are completely lost).
 
2012-12-04 12:43:29 PM  

The One True TheDavid: That's not the Creator, V'ger. That's my mom. There's a difference.


images.wikia.com
 
2012-12-04 12:50:01 PM  
Voyager is awesome. It's gotta have among the best (if not the best) ROI of anything the space program has produced.

ROI being expressed in terms of stuff sent back (ie, pictures and other data).
 
2012-12-04 12:53:10 PM  
We can get data from a proble in the heliosphere 11 billion miles away, but we cant get reliable broadband internet outside of major metro areas. Confused.
 
2012-12-04 12:55:08 PM  

The more you eat the more you fart: We can get data from a proble in the heliosphere 11 billion miles away, but we cant get reliable broadband internet outside of major metro areas. Confused.


Hint: this is what's doing the receiving.

davebullock.com
(The "Mars" antenna at NASA's Goldstone Deep Space Network facility)
 
2012-12-04 12:57:22 PM  

Biness: Waxing_Chewbacca: Biness: Waxing_Chewbacca: Biness: occamswrist: Bit'O'Gristle: funny how we make cars to last only about 1ook miles, but a semi can last over a million.

Semis are measured in minutes, not miles.

perhaps thats why Han said the Millennium Falcon made the kessel run in less than 12 parsecs

That's impossible

I've outrun Imperial starships. Not the local bulk cruisers mind you, I'm talking about the big Corellian ships now. She's fast enough for you old man. What's the cargo?

Your mom and the load I dumped in her last night

/ makes for a bit of a different film, doesn't it

wow. yea, thats just unpleasant.


You came in that thing? You're braver than I thought
 
2012-12-04 01:00:14 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: Biness: Waxing_Chewbacca: Biness: Waxing_Chewbacca: Biness: occamswrist: Bit'O'Gristle: funny how we make cars to last only about 1ook miles, but a semi can last over a million.

Semis are measured in minutes, not miles.

perhaps thats why Han said the Millennium Falcon made the kessel run in less than 12 parsecs

That's impossible

I've outrun Imperial starships. Not the local bulk cruisers mind you, I'm talking about the big Corellian ships now. She's fast enough for you old man. What's the cargo?

Your mom and the load I dumped in her last night

/ makes for a bit of a different film, doesn't it

wow. yea, thats just unpleasant.

You came in that thing? You're braver than I thought


pokerfraudalert.com
 
2012-12-04 01:02:07 PM  

ObscureNameHere: Its worst offense, however, was one you had to live through to appreciate. There was absolutely no NEED or POINT to the show being created in the first place.

 

Yeah. Pretty much just actor salaries / increasing production costs. TV reboots are rare, not so much with film.
 
2012-12-04 01:03:04 PM  

jshine: The more you eat the more you fart: We can get data from a proble in the heliosphere 11 billion miles away, but we cant get reliable broadband internet outside of major metro areas. Confused.

Hint: this is what's doing the receiving.


(The "Mars" antenna at NASA's Goldstone Deep Space Network facility)


But the transmitter is what...45watts at most?

Even at 100watts..a 100watt light bulb 11 billion miles away.
 
2012-12-04 01:04:29 PM  

The more you eat the more you fart: jshine: The more you eat the more you fart: We can get data from a proble in the heliosphere 11 billion miles away, but we cant get reliable broadband internet outside of major metro areas. Confused.

Hint: this is what's doing the receiving.


(The "Mars" antenna at NASA's Goldstone Deep Space Network facility)

But the transmitter is what...45watts at most?

Even at 100watts..a 100watt light bulb 11 billion miles away.



Admittedly it's a very impressive accomplishment regardless of how good the receiving antenna is.
 
2012-12-04 01:04:44 PM  

ObscureNameHere: chewielouie: Voyager > DS9

Oooo look! A Trek troll!

"Voyager" was horrid, or at least, horrid for as long as I held my nose and watched it.

It violated one of the cardinal rules of Trek regarding technology (Don't introduce cool new tech then largely ignore it - e.g. 'biocomputer systems').

It had a central Captain who had the charm and charsima of unpainted drywall.

Its worst offense, however, was one you had to live through to appreciate. There was absolutely no NEED or POINT to the show being created in the first place.

Paramount: 'We are cancelling TNG'
Masses: HOWL!
Paramount: "But-um... we are doing a NEW show to replace it. Sort of."
Massess: WTF? Why not just re-fresh the TNG franchise with a new crew?
Paramount: ......


Actually, it was better than TNG as well. Take away the Borg and Q episodes of TNG, and most of what is left is practically unwatchable today.
 
2012-12-04 01:06:36 PM  

SnarfVader: Biness: SnarfVader: Biness: [www.allpar.com image 576x129]

what a voyager may look like.


I love NASA so much. I wish we'd spend so much more on exploration. Apparently they're in the very early stages of developing a warp drive.

Your gif isn't working. Must be hot.

not a gif. just a jpeg. and hot as blazes. as hot as voyager is cold.

/its lonely out in space

[i212.photobucket.com image 546x270]

You meant this?


Hey don't knock it, I had a 1985 Astro Van


/Mid 80's was a good time to be a space nerd
 
2012-12-04 01:07:16 PM  

chewielouie: Actually, it was better than TNG as well. Take away the Borg and Q episodes of TNG, and most of what is left is practically unwatchable today.


Blasphemy!
 
2012-12-04 01:13:47 PM  
The article mentions how long radio signals at the speed of light reach earth, but is it transmitting in light? Or radio? Not sure if I am missing something. But how long does a radio signal take to make it to earth from there?
 
2012-12-04 01:14:46 PM  

croesius: The article mentions how long radio signals at the speed of light reach earth, but is it transmitting in light? Or radio? Not sure if I am missing something. But how long does a radio signal take to make it to earth from there?


Radio and light are both electromagnetic radiation. They travel at the same speed.
 
2012-12-04 01:18:00 PM  

croesius: The article mentions how long radio signals at the speed of light reach earth, but is it transmitting in light? Or radio? Not sure if I am missing something. But how long does a radio signal take to make it to earth from there?


It is transmitting radio signals. Radio signals and visible light are both regions on the electromagnetic spectrum. Both travel at the same velocity in a vacuum: 186,000 mi/sec.
 
2012-12-04 01:18:45 PM  
Why don't they send out another one of these probes with the ability to continue functioning and sending back data for, like, 100 years?

What? Is that a dumb question?
 
2012-12-04 01:18:57 PM  
It seems that they've been saying Voyager has reached the end of the solar system for twenty years, Could it be they don't know where the end of the solar system is?
 
2012-12-04 01:18:58 PM  

croesius: The article mentions how long radio signals at the speed of light reach earth, but is it transmitting in light? Or radio? Not sure if I am missing something. But how long does a radio signal take to make it to earth from there?


hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu
 
2012-12-04 01:19:58 PM  

doczoidberg: Why don't they send out another one of these probes with the ability to continue functioning and sending back data for, like, 100 years?

What? Is that a dumb question?


It'd be expensive and require a lot of plutonium. Probably do-able though.
 
2012-12-04 01:21:20 PM  
subby: "Boy, don't you wish NASA made cars?"

Considering the percentage of NASA missions that have ended in explosive fireballs, not really.
 
2012-12-04 01:22:28 PM  
All a satellite has to do is go initially with a force and Newton's laws. Basically push it once and it goes forever goes there's no friction in the vacuum of space. What makes you think Newton's 2nd law would transfer over to cars.
 
2012-12-04 01:23:21 PM  

ktybear: My car has over 449,000 kms on the clock and still going strong.

I'm on the way back from the moon Alice!

/Subaru ftw
//go Voyager!!1!


What's that? Like 100 miles or something?

/We still doing this here?
 
2012-12-04 01:24:08 PM  

WhoGAS: ktybear: My car has over 449,000 kms on the clock and still going strong.

I'm on the way back from the moon Alice!

/Subaru ftw
//go Voyager!!1!

What's that? Like 100 miles or something?

/We still doing this here?


278,996 miles.
 
2012-12-04 01:26:58 PM  
I dont get the hate for Voyager and especially for Capt Janeway. My pet theory on the later is that nerds don't understand strong willed older female characters. The only thing they can relate to are females who belong in some comic book (e.g. big tits and skin suit). Hence the hate for Janeway. Voyager was interesting because they encountered new planets and races in most every episode so its like the premise of the original series and it made it interesting AND unlike original star trek, TNG - there was an underlying theme of an actual specific mission (we're lost, we need to get home).

DS9, which I tried to watch this summer on netflix (saw only maybe a quarter of the episodes during its original run), was so boring outside of the Dominion war stuff and maybe some of the episodes involving the Ferenghi (like Quark). They're on a space station so its not like they encounter new planets/races each episode, and there are all those long drawn out boring stuff with Sisko and his kid or his family. Zzzzzzzzz.....
 
2012-12-04 01:27:42 PM  
I'm an OTR driver (yes, chicken fingers and cigarettes are my diet in between having sex with HIV positive hookers) and came here to say this: There's a huge difference in the kinds of miles traveled. Most semi tractors spend their time out on the highway at constant speed. That's much kinder to the equipment than constant acceleration, braking, and turning that one finds in more urbanized areas. Diesel engines also tend to be longer lived than their gasoline powered counterparts. Furthermore, a vehicle maintained with great interest by the user (when it earns your paycheck, you pay close attention to problems) is always going to last longer than one where the user pays no attention to the trouble light that looks like a little oil lamp.
 
2012-12-04 01:29:18 PM  

Biness: Headso: j__z: I'd like to see a few more deep space probes sent out. Seeing that those probes are 35 years old and weren't meant for interstellar studies, It be interesting to see what type of info new ones could send back

/I said probe...giggity.

Also, could we send one out these days with better propulsion technology that would move it out that far in less time? Does NASA have any stuff like that they are testing right now? what's the deal...

i think New Horizons was designed for the Kuiper belt and beyond, once pluto is passed.


Voyager and Voyager 2 were rushed into space because NASA engineers found a rare alignment was happening to allow for some huge gravitational boosts from Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune, then Uranus. Even New Horizons, which had a higher initial velocity than the Voyager probes when leaving Earth, will end up slower than them because of those boosts.
 
2012-12-04 01:36:01 PM  

MadMattressMack: Biness: Headso: j__z: I'd like to see a few more deep space probes sent out. Seeing that those probes are 35 years old and weren't meant for interstellar studies, It be interesting to see what type of info new ones could send back

/I said probe...giggity.

Also, could we send one out these days with better propulsion technology that would move it out that far in less time? Does NASA have any stuff like that they are testing right now? what's the deal...

i think New Horizons was designed for the Kuiper belt and beyond, once pluto is passed.

Voyager and Voyager 2 were rushed into space because NASA engineers found a rare alignment was happening to allow for some huge gravitational boosts from Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune, then Uranus. Even New Horizons, which had a higher initial velocity than the Voyager probes when leaving Earth, will end up slower than them because of those boosts.


i knew something about the boosts, but not that part of it. thanks

i do wish new horizons would hurry the eff up already
 
2012-12-04 01:37:54 PM  

Bit'O'Gristle: funny how we make cars to last only about 1ook miles, but a semi can last over a million.


Cars are fashion accessories. Trucks are capital investments.
 
2012-12-04 01:41:26 PM  

SirEattonHogg: I dont get the hate for Voyager and especially for Capt Janeway. My pet theory on the later is that nerds don't understand strong willed older female characters.


Her character would probably have done better in a less "lost in space" scenario that was Voyager. Instead she's stuck in a show where ill explained technobabble and one deus ex after another save the day. How many times did Harry Kim die, only to be replaced by one from an alternate dimension? Voyager also stripped the Borg of whatever threatening presence they had.

Voyager was interesting because they encountered new planets and races in most every episode so its like the premise of the original series and it made it interesting AND unlike original star trek, TNG - there was an underlying theme of an actual specific mission (we're lost, we need to get home).

Or they have utter nonsense like "alliances" with the Borg and the "Omega molecule," which involves the single worst line to ever be uttered by a Star Trek captain I've ever heard.

They're on a space station so its not like they encounter new planets/races each episode, and there are all those long drawn out boring stuff with Sisko and his kid or his family. Zzzzzzzzz.....
DS9 was great, and if anything had far more developed characters than any of the other series. The Dominion War was just the cherry on top.

Now back to your Actual Fark Topic.
 
2012-12-04 01:42:33 PM  

doczoidberg: Why don't they send out another one of these probes with the ability to continue functioning and sending back data for, like, 100 years?

What? Is that a dumb question?


$$$.

/actually, more like $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ $$.
 
2012-12-04 01:45:20 PM  

JackieRabbit: croesius: The article mentions how long radio signals at the speed of light reach earth, but is it transmitting in light? Or radio? Not sure if I am missing something. But how long does a radio signal take to make it to earth from there?

It is transmitting radio signals. Radio signals and visible light are both regions on the electromagnetic spectrum. Both travel at the same velocity in a vacuum: 186,000 mi/sec.


JackieRabbit: croesius: The article mentions how long radio signals at the speed of light reach earth, but is it transmitting in light? Or radio? Not sure if I am missing something. But how long does a radio signal take to make it to earth from there?

It is transmitting radio signals. Radio signals and visible light are both regions on the electromagnetic spectrum. Both travel at the same velocity in a vacuum: 186,000 mi/sec.


Well, I definitely should have known that, but since I didn't, explodinghead.gif
 
2012-12-04 01:54:47 PM  

Mark Ratner: SnarfVader: [i212.photobucket.com image 368x500]

So, the caption in the picture is wrong and it didn't really exit the solar system back in 1990?


As stated by Doug Adams -"Space," it says, "is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mindbogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist's, but that's just peanuts to space, listen..." Even the exit is light-years wide.
 
2012-12-04 01:57:30 PM  
What, again?
 
2012-12-04 01:58:20 PM  

oryx: It seems that they've been saying Voyager has reached the end of the solar system for twenty years, Could it be they don't know where the end of the solar system is?


That is correct. This is all new information as nothing has ever gone this far out of our Solar System to take measurements.

MadMattressMack: Biness: Headso: j__z: I'd like to see a few more deep space probes sent out. Seeing that those probes are 35 years old and weren't meant for interstellar studies, It be interesting to see what type of info new ones could send back

/I said probe...giggity.

Also, could we send one out these days with better propulsion technology that would move it out that far in less time? Does NASA have any stuff like that they are testing right now? what's the deal...

i think New Horizons was designed for the Kuiper belt and beyond, once pluto is passed.

Voyager and Voyager 2 were rushed into space because NASA engineers found a rare alignment was happening to allow for some huge gravitational boosts from Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune, then Uranus. Even New Horizons, which had a higher initial velocity than the Voyager probes when leaving Earth, will end up slower than them because of those boosts.


Correct. Neither of the Voyager satellites had any propulsion aside from gravity. Is Dawn going to go out of this Solar System with its Ion Drive?
 
2012-12-04 02:11:32 PM  

SnarfVader: aka Read the rest of the thread where I acknowledge the caption is incorrect, but the picture is cool.


I love when I see something like that picture that I have a question about and then everyone answers it right away without me even having to ask, so when I get around to the thread I just get all the info I want on it immediately. It rarely ever happens this cleanly
 
2012-12-04 02:27:10 PM  

DeathCipris: oryx: It seems that they've been saying Voyager has reached the end of the solar system for twenty years, Could it be they don't know where the end of the solar system is?

That is correct. This is all new information as nothing has ever gone this far out of our Solar System to take measurements.

MadMattressMack: Biness: Headso: j__z: I'd like to see a few more deep space probes sent out. Seeing that those probes are 35 years old and weren't meant for interstellar studies, It be interesting to see what type of info new ones could send back

/I said probe...giggity.

Also, could we send one out these days with better propulsion technology that would move it out that far in less time? Does NASA have any stuff like that they are testing right now? what's the deal...

i think New Horizons was designed for the Kuiper belt and beyond, once pluto is passed.

Voyager and Voyager 2 were rushed into space because NASA engineers found a rare alignment was happening to allow for some huge gravitational boosts from Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune, then Uranus. Even New Horizons, which had a higher initial velocity than the Voyager probes when leaving Earth, will end up slower than them because of those boosts.

Correct. Neither of the Voyager satellites had any propulsion aside from gravity. Is Dawn going to go out of this Solar System with its Ion Drive?


I doubt it. It was built with the idea of going to, slowing down, and orbiting Ceres and Vesta. When it reaches it's orbit of Ceres it is expected to have used up 385 kg of the total 425 kg of xenon propellant on board (source wiki). At that point it'll still be in solar orbit and in orbit of Ceres. I doubt it'll have enough for a Delta V to get it out of the system. Hopefully it'll have enough to look at 1 more thing before it's stuck in a solar orbit.
 
2012-12-04 02:30:13 PM  

Mad Scientist: I think the most amazing thing is that its transmitter has enough power to get a readable signal all the way back to Earth.


I recall reading many years ago, when Voyager wasn't nearly as far out, that a communication from the probe struck the Earth communications dish with less energy than a single snowflake hitting the ground.
 
2012-12-04 03:26:37 PM  

microlith: SirEattonHogg: I dont get the hate for Voyager and especially for Capt Janeway. My pet theory on the later is that nerds don't understand strong willed older female characters.

Her character would probably have done better in a less "lost in space" scenario that was Voyager. Instead she's stuck in a show where ill explained technobabble and one deus ex after another save the day. How many times did Harry Kim die, only to be replaced by one from an alternate dimension? Voyager also stripped the Borg of whatever threatening presence they had.

Voyager was interesting because they encountered new planets and races in most every episode so its like the premise of the original series and it made it interesting AND unlike original star trek, TNG - there was an underlying theme of an actual specific mission (we're lost, we need to get home).

Or they have utter nonsense like "alliances" with the Borg and the "Omega molecule," which involves the single worst line to ever be uttered by a Star Trek captain I've ever heard.

They're on a space station so its not like they encounter new planets/races each episode, and there are all those long drawn out boring stuff with Sisko and his kid or his family. Zzzzzzzzz.....
DS9 was great, and if anything had far more developed characters than any of the other series. The Dominion War was just the cherry on top.

Now back to your Actual Fark Topic.


I really had a problem with the ending of Voyager, I mean if you were the Borg and one enemy ship just kicked the shiat you of you and seems to have acquired future tech weapons that render you vulnerable what would your reaction be?

If I was the Borg I'd send everything I had right at the Federation and kick the crap out of them while I still had a chance. I'd love to see a new series based on that, call Star Trek Resistance.
 
2012-12-04 04:21:38 PM  

t3knomanser: If NASA made cars, they'd cost $1Bn. When something breaks, you won't be able to fix or replace it, instead an engineer will write ten-thousand new lines of code to program some other part on your car to do the job instead. It'll be solar powered, and the body will have the same sexy curves you might see on a brick.


But it would run for 6 years on a single tank of gas.
 
2012-12-04 04:29:09 PM  

jshine: doczoidberg: Why don't they send out another one of these probes with the ability to continue functioning and sending back data for, like, 100 years?

What? Is that a dumb question?

It'd be expensive and require a lot of plutonium. Probably do-able though.


I think you'd run into issues with the lifespan of the thermocouples on current RTGs well before the century mark. The new Stirling engine RTGs might be able to make the trip though.
 
2012-12-04 04:37:36 PM  

Slaves2Darkness:
I really had a problem with the ending of Voyager, I mean if you were the Borg and one enemy ship just kicked the shiat you of you and seems to have acquired future tech weapons that render you vulnerable what would your reaction be?

If I was the Borg I'd send everything I had right at the Federation and kick the crap out of them while I still had a chance. I'd love to see a new series based on that, call Star Trek Resistance.


Janeway defeated the Borg once and for all. And don't throw any EU crap at me, nobody gives a shiat about any of that crap. The only thing that matters is what happens in the movies and tv series. The same goes for Star Wars.

And if you hated the ending to Voyager, you must have really hated the ending to DS9. All the nonsense about the wormhole aliens (prophets) was unbelievably stu-pid. The best thing about DS9 was the relationship between Quark and Odo, the Klingons, the Dominion war stuff, the hotties on the station and Trials and Tribble-ations.
 
2012-12-04 04:40:50 PM  

theresnothinglft: t3knomanser: If NASA made cars, they'd cost $1Bn. When something breaks, you won't be able to fix or replace it, instead an engineer will write ten-thousand new lines of code to program some other part on your car to do the job instead. It'll be solar powered, and the body will have the same sexy curves you might see on a brick.

But it would run for 6 years on a single tank of gas.


Conservation of momentum, how does it work?
 
2012-12-04 04:46:02 PM  
So how long until Megatron finds it?
 
2012-12-04 04:53:24 PM  

JackieRabbit: It is transmitting radio signals. Radio signals and visible light are both regions on the electromagnetic spectrum. Both travel at the same velocity in a vacuum: 186,000 mi/sec.


What about a non-vacuum? Major difference in speed?
 
2012-12-04 04:55:41 PM  

pastorkius: I think you'd run into issues with the lifespan of the thermocouples on current RTGs well before the century mark. The new Stirling engine RTGs might be able to make the trip though.


Thermocouples should be pretty durable since they're just two metals pressed together. ...and even if they did fail at a certain rate, you could just over-engineer the RTGs with extra thermocouples at t=0 to account for the failures over time.

Basically you'd be launching a huge batch of over-engineered RTGs with the expectation that they would still produce a usable amount of power after 100 years. Given how much experience we have building these things, there shouldn't be too many unknown variables.
 
2012-12-04 04:57:14 PM  

saturn badger: JackieRabbit: It is transmitting radio signals. Radio signals and visible light are both regions on the electromagnetic spectrum. Both travel at the same velocity in a vacuum: 186,000 mi/sec.

What about a non-vacuum? Major difference in speed?


Yes, that's what the refractive index of a substance indicates.
 
2012-12-04 04:57:50 PM  

pastorkius: jshine: doczoidberg: Why don't they send out another one of these probes with the ability to continue functioning and sending back data for, like, 100 years?

What? Is that a dumb question?

It'd be expensive and require a lot of plutonium. Probably do-able though.

I think you'd run into issues with the lifespan of the thermocouples on current RTGs well before the century mark. The new Stirling engine RTGs might be able to make the trip though.


Make some RTGs that are empty of radioactive material, and "load them" when needed. The thermocouples won't degrade if they aren't being used. You might even work out a mechanism the shift the radioactive material from one RTG to another.

The real problem, though, is the radioactive material is going to decay whether you are extracting useful energy from it or not.

/TANSTAAFL.
 
2012-12-04 05:33:48 PM  
What's the mpg on that thing?
 
2012-12-04 05:38:20 PM  
Then some farking Klingons come by and use it for target practice!
 
2012-12-04 05:45:02 PM  

pastorkius: jshine: doczoidberg: Why don't they send out another one of these probes with the ability to continue functioning and sending back data for, like, 100 years?

What? Is that a dumb question?

It'd be expensive and require a lot of plutonium. Probably do-able though.

I think you'd run into issues with the lifespan of the thermocouples on current RTGs well before the century mark. The new Stirling engine RTGs might be able to make the trip though.


I'd trust a thermionic converter to last 100 years without maintainence before a Stirling engine.
 
2012-12-04 05:59:12 PM  
It's the equivalent of being shot out of a cannon. So no, I don't wish they made cars. That thing doesn't have brakes.
 
2012-12-04 06:02:38 PM  
Since we're referencing Carl Sagan, I believe he proposed in his book Broca's Brain (in the 70's no less) that we had then the technology to develop a spacecraft to be able to propel itself at 1/10th the speed of light -- using Ion drive which was all the rage at the time.

He suggested we could build that spacecraft, get to Alpha Proxima or Centuri in 40+ years, and then send a radio message back - all within 50+ years or in our lifetime. Using existing technologies.

If that was truly doable and we had done that, we could be almost there already and be waiting for the response right now.
 
2012-12-04 06:08:34 PM  

ChipNASA: Biness: Apparently they're in the very early stages of developing a warp drive.


NASA is working on a faster than Light Warp Drive.
/rly?? Ya Rly!
//Clickypops


Oh yeah, the Alcubierre Drive.
According the estimates I've read on its energy requirements:
If you could convert matter to energy at 100% efficiency...
And you converted the entire rest mass of the known universe to energy...
You would still fall short of the required energy to run this drive...
By several orders of magnitude.

So a good idea, although impractical.
Basically it is a way to go FTL without breaking the laws of physics.
But at that level of energy, you can pretty much do as you damn well please.
Including rewriting the laws of physics and spawning new universes.
 
2012-12-04 06:51:48 PM  

Sweeve: using Ion drive which was all the rage at the time


Still is
 
2012-12-04 07:09:39 PM  
The NASA car would have faulty parts that engineers saw, but didn't correct because it wasn't their area and they didn't want to step on any toes. That car would also explode killing everyone 2 times out of every 135 trips...or 1.4% of the time

so 62 million cars in the US that have a 1.4% chance of exploding anytime they make a trip, and let's just say everyone takes their car on 1 trip a day. So 868,000 deaths a day, at least. Sounds like a great car.


imgs.xkcd.com
 
2012-12-04 07:21:48 PM  

t3knomanser: If NASA made cars, they'd cost $1Bn. When something breaks, you won't be able to fix or replace it, instead an engineer will write ten-thousand new lines of code to program some other part on your car to do the job instead. It'll be solar powered, and the body will have the same sexy curves you might see on a brick.


The rover on Mars recently put there by a rocket powered skycrane is telling you to shut the hell up. NASA does way more with far less money than any other government agency, despite having to suffer being "led" by political appointees who learned their science from the back of boxed cereals. NASA is something to be proud of, and generally the people who mock their successes either suffer from tiny rocket syndrome, or mental midgets who think the reason space is black is because it isn't directly illuminated by the light of Jesus.

In short, go choke on twelve cocks.
 
2012-12-04 08:32:10 PM  
Cpl.D - a bit harsh if done simultaneously but otherwise ok.

when confronted with the fundie types (as opposed to the de-funding types) i use an argument i once read (can't remember from who). "what is the first activity set for man by your God in your bible? it was go forth and name everything. what is the first thing we do when a probe or astronaut sees something new? we name it!"

for the de-fundies: the tiny NASA budget has been repaid any times over by spinoffs. the sales taxes alone on products spun-off would probably cover most of their budget. remember it only totals about $800B since inception and that includes a few moon and mars landings and hundreds of satellite shots.

to think what they could do with real leadership and a guaranteed annual budget.
 
2012-12-04 08:39:01 PM  

thedad: when confronted with the fundie types (as opposed to the de-funding types) i use an argument i once read (can't remember from who). "what is the first activity set for man by your God in your bible? it was go forth and name everything. what is the first thing we do when a probe or astronaut sees something new? we name it!"


I really like that and fully intend to steal it for soon if not immediate use.
 
2012-12-04 08:40:50 PM  

dittybopper: basemetal: Wake me up when it hits the ort cloud.

If you know what it is, they you Oort to know how it's spelled.


"they you Oort"?

Paging Mr. Rotsky. Mr. Rotsky to thread #7466816.
 
2012-12-04 08:52:25 PM  
As someone who was at JPL today, I'm getting a kick...
 
2012-12-04 08:57:49 PM  

Raven Darke: ChipNASA: Biness: Apparently they're in the very early stages of developing a warp drive.


NASA is working on a faster than Light Warp Drive.
/rly?? Ya Rly!
//Clickypops

Oh yeah, the Alcubierre Drive.
According the estimates I've read on its energy requirements:
If you could convert matter to energy at 100% efficiency...
And you converted the entire rest mass of the known universe to energy...
You would still fall short of the required energy to run this drive...
By several orders of magnitude.

So a good idea, although impractical.
Basically it is a way to go FTL without breaking the laws of physics.
But at that level of energy, you can pretty much do as you damn well please.
Including rewriting the laws of physics and spawning new universes.



Your information is out of date.

Try as much mass-energy as Jupiter, not the universe.
 
2012-12-04 09:45:37 PM  

KangTheMad: Try as much mass-energy as Jupiter, not the universe.


I do believe they've narrowed it down to a metric ton at this point, but that requires exotic materials.
 
2012-12-04 09:52:11 PM  

basemetal: Wake me up when it hits the ort cloud.


Voyager is at 122 AU, the Oort Cloud is 50,000 AU. You might be waiting a while.
 
2012-12-04 10:01:51 PM  

scalpod: dittybopper: basemetal: Wake me up when it hits the ort cloud.

If you know what it is, they you Oort to know how it's spelled.

"they you Oort"?

Paging Mr. Rotsky. Mr. Rotsky to thread #7466816.


Nah, I think that was an autocomplete failure.
 
2012-12-04 10:03:56 PM  

jshine: saturn badger: JackieRabbit: It is transmitting radio signals. Radio signals and visible light are both regions on the electromagnetic spectrum. Both travel at the same velocity in a vacuum: 186,000 mi/sec.

What about a non-vacuum? Major difference in speed?

Yes, that's what the refractive index of a substance indicates.


Thanks. I don't fathom the math but the concept is fairly clear.
 
2012-12-04 10:28:07 PM  

RicosRoughnecks: KangTheMad: Try as much mass-energy as Jupiter, not the universe.

I do believe they've narrowed it down to a metric ton at this point, but that requires exotic materials.


considering the massive leap in mass requirements, in another 12 years that might not be a challenge at all.
 
2012-12-05 12:56:16 AM  

saturn badger: JackieRabbit: It is transmitting radio signals. Radio signals and visible light are both regions on the electromagnetic spectrum. Both travel at the same velocity in a vacuum: 186,000 mi/sec.

What about a non-vacuum? Major difference in speed?


About the same difference as seeing lightning and hearing thunder.
 
2012-12-05 01:00:40 AM  

Raven Darke: ChipNASA: Biness: Apparently they're in the very early stages of developing a warp drive.


NASA is working on a faster than Light Warp Drive.
/rly?? Ya Rly!
//Clickypops

Oh yeah, the Alcubierre Drive.
According the estimates I've read on its energy requirements:
If you could convert matter to energy at 100% efficiency...
And you converted the entire rest mass of the known universe to energy...
You would still fall short of the required energy to run this drive...
By several orders of magnitude.

So a good idea, although impractical.
Basically it is a way to go FTL without breaking the laws of physics.
But at that level of energy, you can pretty much do as you damn well please.
Including rewriting the laws of physics and spawning new universes.


Someone didn't read the article:

"...if you adjust the shape of the ring surrounding the object, from something that looks like a flat halo into something thicker and curvier, you could power Alcubierre's warp drive with a mass roughly the size of NASA's Voyager 1 probe. (In other words: reduction in energy requirements from a planet with a mass equivalent to over 300 Earths, down to an object that weighs just under 1,600 pounds.) What's more, if you oscillate the space warp, White claims you could reduce the energy load even further."
 
2012-12-05 01:21:17 AM  

MaliFinn: saturn badger: JackieRabbit: It is transmitting radio signals. Radio signals and visible light are both regions on the electromagnetic spectrum. Both travel at the same velocity in a vacuum: 186,000 mi/sec.

What about a non-vacuum? Major difference in speed?

About the same difference as seeing lightning and hearing thunder.


Nice try.
 
2012-12-05 02:11:06 AM  

Biness: I love NASA so much. I wish we'd spend so much more on exploration. Apparently they're in the very early stages of developing a warp drive.


Not really.
More like they have an idea of how one might possibly work and they're conducting early tests of pieces of the underlying theory without building anything that might, even generously, be called a "warp drive".
 
2012-12-05 03:14:15 AM  
I liked voyager and tng but ds9 was the best Star Trek series by far. The acting and character development were superior by far, with only a handful of bad episodes (where as voyager and tng had many). Not to mention it had th best story archs of all the series.

/rewatched all of them on Netflix recently, in order.
//every ds9 episode was worth watching, even the bad ones.
///currently watching Enterprise - which I hated when it was on the air. It's not as bad as I remember. It's biggest downfall was Scott bakula I think. Terrible actor.
 
2012-12-05 05:15:24 AM  
This is our Milky Way Galaxy (wikipedia) (Artist's rendering, of course):

Our Sun is circled in the image. In fact, our entire solar system fits in that circle. In 35 years, while moving at 35,791 mph (57,600 km/h), traversing 11 billion miles, Voyager 1 hasn't even left that circle. In fact, travelling at the speed of light for over 100 years, the very first radio transmissions haven't escaped that circle. And if somehow intelligent life on the opposite side of the galaxy had a telescope and could see the Earth in super fine detail, the light from the earliest man won't have reached them yet. That's our galaxy. And the universe is full of galaxies. I marvel at just how small we truly are.

/not intended to be depressing
 
2012-12-05 06:25:56 AM  

Gawdzila: Biness: I love NASA so much. I wish we'd spend so much more on exploration. Apparently they're in the very early stages of developing a warp drive.

Not really.
More like they have an idea of how one might possibly work and they're conducting early tests of pieces of the underlying theory without building anything that might, even generously, be called a "warp drive".


"very early stages"
 
2012-12-05 07:13:11 AM  

Biness: Gawdzila: Biness: I love NASA so much. I wish we'd spend so much more on exploration. Apparently they're in the very early stages of developing a warp drive.

Not really.
More like they have an idea of how one might possibly work and they're conducting early tests of pieces of the underlying theory without building anything that might, even generously, be called a "warp drive".

"very early stages"


Yeah. By that standard, I'm in the very early stages of becoming the supreme ruler of the entire Earth and making all women my personal concubines.
 
2012-12-05 08:32:46 AM  

WhiskeyBoy: Our Sun is circled in the image. In fact, our entire solar system fits in that circle. In 35 years, while moving at 35,791 mph (57,600 km/h), traversing 11 billion miles, Voyager 1 hasn't even left that circle. In fact, travelling at the speed of light for over 100 years, the very first radio transmissions haven't escaped that circle. And if somehow intelligent life on the opposite side of the galaxy had a telescope and could see the Earth in super fine detail, the light from the earliest man won't have reached them yet. That's our galaxy. And the universe is full of galaxies. I marvel at just how small we truly are.


That's really interesting, and that is why I have always thought that aliens haven't visited earth. I mean if our radio signals have barely gotten out of our own neighboorhood. So if that is the case how would aliens find us, other than total randomness. And considering there are billions of planets in the galaxy, with huge distances between them aliens finding us randomly would be nearly impossible.
 
2012-12-05 08:46:31 AM  

WhiskeyBoy: This is our Milky Way Galaxy (wikipedia) (Artist's rendering, of course):

Our Sun is circled in the image. In fact, our entire solar system fits in that circle. In 35 years, while moving at 35,791 mph (57,600 km/h), traversing 11 billion miles, Voyager 1 hasn't even left that circle. In fact, travelling at the speed of light for over 100 years, the very first radio transmissions haven't escaped that circle. And if somehow intelligent life on the opposite side of the galaxy had a telescope and could see the Earth in super fine detail, the light from the earliest man won't have reached them yet. That's our galaxy. And the universe is full of galaxies. I marvel at just how small we truly are.

/not intended to be depressing


So that's the Alpha quadrant.
 
2012-12-05 09:16:53 AM  

WhiskeyBoy: This is our Milky Way Galaxy (wikipedia) (Artist's rendering, of course):

Our Sun is circled in the image. In fact, our entire solar system fits in that circle. In 35 years, while moving at 35,791 mph (57,600 km/h), traversing 11 billion miles, Voyager 1 hasn't even left that circle. In fact, travelling at the speed of light for over 100 years, the very first radio transmissions haven't escaped that circle. And if somehow intelligent life on the opposite side of the galaxy had a telescope and could see the Earth in super fine detail, the light from the earliest man won't have reached them yet. That's our galaxy. And the universe is full of galaxies. I marvel at just how small we truly are.

/not intended to be depressing


Actually, it's worse than that: Most high powered radio transmissions before WWII were relatively low frequency, and they were reflected back to Earth by the ionosphere. It wasn't until WWII that we started transmitting high power on frequencies in the "microwave window":

upload.wikimedia.org

So it's only been about 70 years, realistically.

That's not to say it's not possible, though: There are something like 1,400 star systems within 50 light years of our system, containing 2,000 stars, and the evidence seems to be that planets are common enough.
 
2012-12-05 11:56:42 AM  

Waxing_Chewbacca: That's impossible


No it's not. You just cut the corners. It's called cheating and some people brag about it.
 
2012-12-05 04:10:24 PM  

Biness: Gawdzila: Biness: I love NASA so much. I wish we'd spend so much more on exploration. Apparently they're in the very early stages of developing a warp drive.

Not really.
More like they have an idea of how one might possibly work and they're conducting early tests of pieces of the underlying theory without building anything that might, even generously, be called a "warp drive".

"very early stages"


Yeah, I still don't think that's an accurate way to characterize it. Testing pieces of physical theory is not the same as developing technologies that might come from them. By that logic, James Clerk Maxwell was in the very early stages of developing radio and television.
 
2012-12-05 04:41:08 PM  
Got a 1970 truck w/430,000

Damn good record
 
2012-12-05 11:32:37 PM  

SirEattonHogg: I dont get the hate for Voyager...


img15.imageshack.us 

Any questions?
 
2012-12-06 12:13:10 AM  
Wouldn't it be hilarious if the probe bumped into the inside wall of a big sphere? What if our solar system was the setting for a reality show watched by the gods... a much larger-scale version of The Truman Show? Hell, they could be sitting in a bar right now, running a betting pool on when the probe is going to bang into the wall.
 
2012-12-06 09:43:26 PM  

Gawdzila: Biness: I love NASA so much. I wish we'd spend so much more on exploration. Apparently they're in the very early stages of developing a warp drive.

Not really.
More like they have an idea of how one might possibly work and they're conducting early tests of pieces of the underlying theory without building anything that might, even generously, be called a "warp drive".


To make apple pie from scratch, you must first build the universe ~Carl Sagan

By all means, pray for rain. But dig a well while you're doing it.~Some Guy
 
Displayed 167 of 167 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report