If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(ReadWrite)   Tech Journalists: Let's all have a good cry for those poor snowflake start-ups who wasted billions of dollars this year. TFA Author: Um, how about no   (readwrite.com) divider line 10
    More: Hero, angel investors, sheds, startup company, Robert Scoble, journalists, dollars, Silicon Valley, University of Michigan  
•       •       •

6866 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Dec 2012 at 8:05 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Archived thread
2012-12-04 08:10:21 AM  
4 votes:
Maybe these young people will realize they have only one life and that they should do something valuable with the brief time they have.

This is usually why someone starts a startup.
2012-12-04 08:15:18 AM  
3 votes:
There was a good point to be made, but he didn't make it. He just old-man-yells-at-cloud'd it the whole way.
2012-12-04 11:59:44 AM  
2 votes:

imashark: FTFA: "In my dreams I imagine them leaving the Valley and going off to accomplish something meaningful. Using those brains to do medical research, develop new drugs or eradicate poverty. I imagine them teaching in public schools, providing health care to poor kids. Joining Tesla or SpaceX. Pushing AI a few steps forward. Solving big problems, the kind that can't get solved in three days on a StartupBus.

They might not get rich, but at least they'd be doing something useful."


Like blogging.
2012-12-04 08:32:01 AM  
2 votes:

mrlewish: The author has a bit of sour grapes I suspects. So no company should ever hire anybody that does not have experience? That means in 50 years time there would be no employment.


It's not about "hiring people with no experience," it's throwing oodles of cash at some guy just out of school who just uses a bunch of buzzwords to describe a service without much research into whether the service is needed.

Over the last few years I've watched my boss deal with angel investors and VC to try and start up another company. It's fascinating. Half the investors walk right back out the door when they realize he's not 20 years old. This may be because they are only interested in hip young talent, or they realize that they are going to be dealing with someone older and wiser and who already runs a successful company, so the investors aren't going to be able to rake their target over the coals in some money-speak "if the company goes big, well the investors will kick you out to put their guy in place kind of scheme because the stock we are offering you is worthless" scheme.

I got to listen in on another discussion between him and different VC. My boss wanted to start the new business in the same office park that our current business is in for convenience so he could keep an eye on both companies. The VC refused to invest because the VC demanded that the company be started in an area 30 miles away, preferably in a loft studio converted from the shell of an old factory because that would make the company "hip and attractive".
2012-12-04 08:21:44 AM  
2 votes:
Is it just me or was that entire "article" basically just a big rant about whippersnappers being stupid because some of them dared to take a chance at doing something bigger than just going to college, slapping on a suit and tie and hitting the pavement with a briefcase full of resumes in a job market where nobody is hiring them outside the Sears bed and bath section anyway?

And this guy used to write for Forbes? Really? You can find less pointless vitriol and better prose from raging fanboys in a Fark thread about Apple or Android. 

Congrats on getting your shiatty pseudo-blog greenlit, though.
2012-12-04 09:37:03 PM  
1 votes:
Look, TFA isn't biatching about startups in general, just people throwing money at any fool who comes along with any fool idea. This is so like the .com bubble I had to check the date on the article. These angel investors don't seem to remember that for every Google and Amazon, there were about ten thousand webvans and pets.coms that went down the shiatter overnight. Seriously, Gourmair? How could anyone think that would work? Have we already devolved into a nation of immobile Hutts who can't even get off our asses and find a gourmet grocery?

Really though, this phenomenon is way older than the internet. For every Wal Mart or Target, there are thousands of Beanie Baby stores or similar idiotic shiat that crater in its wake.
2012-12-04 01:11:06 PM  
1 votes:
www.explosm.net
2012-12-04 09:55:17 AM  
1 votes:
FTFA: "In my dreams I imagine them leaving the Valley and going off to accomplish something meaningful. Using those brains to do medical research, develop new drugs or eradicate poverty. I imagine them teaching in public schools, providing health care to poor kids. Joining Tesla or SpaceX. Pushing AI a few steps forward. Solving big problems, the kind that can't get solved in three days on a StartupBus.

They might not get rich, but at least they'd be doing something useful."

You see, here's the problem. No one is paying anyone to do something useful. And the author is wondering why people aren't doing those 'hard things' and instead are rolling the start-up lottery.

I bet you if people could make millions solving those hard, big problems as part of a large team (because the complexity of the problems we have now necessitate teams of people working on them) they'd flock to those employment opportunities by the thousands.

Instead we get 100,000 facebooks, groupons, and other idiotic hip and trendy social media companies because if you roll snake eyes and catch the public's/vc's/wall street's attention, you're set on the gravy train for life.

Because if you work for Sandia, or Bell, or Los Alamos, or Raytheon you get a salary - if you actually do solve something big, surprise, you get... your salary. And maybe a small bonus. Because your work at these large engineering companies is owned by the big companies. You definitely don't get a share in the (monumental) profits from your labor, because, surprise, its not you that did the hard thing. No, its the investors, and the shareholders, because they took risks that you might not solve it. Or wouldn't solve it in a timely fashion. Or wouldn't solve it at all.

And they had to market it, get it certified by the government, and get it packaged, and get it monetized, etc etc etc...

You want me to sum it up? In short: The market is structured in such a way for the individual that taking risk trumps achievement in today's economy.


Even shorter: the author of this article is stupid.
2012-12-04 08:49:14 AM  
1 votes:
Ahhh, welcome to the modern economy. Where not only are your odds of success smaller than ever as a start-up, but smarmy asswads chastise those that try to take the risks. There is market saturation in nearly every industry, and large monolithic companies rule tightly controlled oligopolies. People are pushed to the outer edges of quirky for business ideas because there is so little room for market share in anywhere. However brave writer, you stay strong lambasting people that took risks to start a business in this bleak economic climate.
2012-12-04 08:09:25 AM  
1 votes:
The author has a bit of sour grapes I suspects. So no company should ever hire anybody that does not have experience? That means in 50 years time there would be no employment.
 
Displayed 10 of 10 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report