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(Fark)   Subby's going through his first typhoon tomorrow, Typhoon Bopha (aka Pablo). Needs advice   (fark.com ) divider line
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1585 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Dec 2012 at 12:26 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-03 01:50:38 PM  
6 votes:
I guess I'll throw this out here. I've been through the eye of 1 hurricane and within 50 miles of the eye of 3 others. Plus more times than I can remember for outer rain bands and effects of other hurricanes/ tropical storms.

1. At the start of hurricane season - I check my generator (bought a used one for $60 off season that can run my fridge and a fan / window AC - and it has for 5 days before) and grab some 5 gallon bottles of water. You want to go off the plan of 1 gallon per person per day. Plan for a week. You probably won't need that much, but it's better to have too much than not enough. I check my flashlight batteries and candle supply. I get some extras of both and stash them as I'm sure my kid will find some of the flashlights and kill the batteries during the season. I also check out my first aid kit and have a police scanner.

Also, check the trees around your house. If any look like they're dead or rotting, or if you have some limbs going over your house then trim them. Do it before the storm is coming.

if you're in a new or unfamiliar area, ask the people who've been there for a while about flooding. You're just trying to figure out places that have creeks/rivers that can flood or areas where ponding is already a problem. Avoid those areas during a hurricane.

I also check my ammo. During the last couple of hurricanes the police scanner was full of some pretty nasty stuff going down. Plus I know people who've had to draw (but never fired) to protect themselves from looters (a generator in a world without power is a noisy beacon). If you do have to draw, even if nothing happens you have to call the police immediately Don't try to be Rambo or John Wayne. But it is something that's better to have and not need than to need and not have. It's not going to be a full on state of anarchy and you'll find most people banding together to help each other, but there are also opportunists who will try to take advantage of the situation. And remember, if you have to pull it out in defense, you're also pulling out your check book for a lawyer.

2. if a storm is within 5 days of possible landfall at my location I start filling my wife's car and my truck up at 3/4 of a tank instead of letting it get down to the usual nothing. I also go grocery shopping and plan on a week of can stores following the storm. I only get stuff I don't mind eating if the storm doesn't come this way. I also filly my 5 gallon gas cans up. I check my flashlights and candle supply.

3. If a storm is within 3 days of landing then I start paying attention to storm surge and wind information. If the winds are under 100 mph and / or you're over 30 - 40 miles inland you should be pretty much OK in newer structures. if they're over 100 mph you might want to look into a shelter or a newer structure to stay in. Hopefully the area you're in has building standards that require the use of hurricane straps during construction.

If you don't know, put you're head in the attic and see if you see any of these:

shop1.mailordercentral.com

if you don't, then you're house can have the roof blow off in high winds. I wouldn't stay in a place like that with any hurricane force winds. It may be safe, but if you can be cautious why not be.

4. At 48 hours it's time to decide to evacuate. Run from water, hide from wind. That means if you're in a flood prone area, you should look at evacuating. Also pay attention as the media will be going crazy about it. If you start seeing out of area news crews you may want to leave. Pay attention to authorities as well. If they're begging you to leave or asking you to put a toe tag on say they can identify the body, you may want to leave.

If you're not leaving and you're going to hide from the wind, then it's time to board up. Get some 3/4" plywood and screw them to the window frame. However, doing this is up to you. I don't board my house up as it's new enough and I'm far enough inland that it shouldn't be a problem.

This is also when you double check everything that's before this. You'll also want to get at least a few hundred dollars in cash.

5. At 24 hours it's time to take it easy. You don't go to work. You don't do much. I usually do some online gaming as it may be a while before I get to do that again. Make sure all of your cell phones are charged up. I usually plugged in until the power goes out. We only eat things that are in the fridge.

6. During the storm just stay in and relax. The power will probably go out. You will probably hear some transformers exploding and power lines arcing. The wind gets really loud and it rains a lot. Keep an eye out at least every 30 - 60 minutes to check to make sure you're not getting flooded. Don't try to drive around. Depending on the size and speed of the storm it may be over in anywhere from 8 to 24 hours.

If you start to see it flooding you can either try to ride out the flooding if you don't think it'll be that bad or call the authorities for a rescue. But the odds of a rescue during a storm are pretty low. That's why the decision to evacuate early on is so important.

7. After the storm for me it's just been a matter of hanging out for a while. Read a book. Play board / card games with your neighbors. Conserve gas as it may be a while before you can get more.

After Ike I wouldn't go back to work until they got a fuel truck there and had gas to give back to me for driving up there. Don't go driving around gawking at the damage.

The longest I've gone without power was 8 days Rita. But I knew someone that had power so I stayed with them. But during Ike it was only 2 days. During that time I just hung out and cleaned. You'll figure out stuff to do to keep busy.

if your house was damaged then FEMA sets up these locations that you can go to that also have appraisers on hand from the major insurance carriers for the area. During Ike they had them at the Lowes and Home Depots parking lots. It's a nice 1 stop streamlined process to get the ball rolling on repairs. If your house in uninhabitable FEMA was also picking up the tab on hotels. Believe it or not, during a major event like this FEMA is somewhat useful. I've hear horror stories from people who were in NO after Katrina, but they've definitely gotten their shiat together since then.

After that life slowly returns to normal. About 2 weeks after fuel supplies are coming in to the point that most gas stations are open and the power's generally back on. if your house has damage the insurance appraiser has been by and an initial work crew has come to make it habitable until you can get it repaired. You may have to fight with the insurance company on the amounts for months afterward, but you're not homeless. After a month to 6 weeks it's pretty much business as usual.

I hope this helps someone a little bit. I know it's rambling and a lot of stuff, but it's what I've learned. Take what you want from it, but I'm just throwing it out as some help from someone who's been there.
2012-12-03 12:36:08 PM  
4 votes:
Don't expect ANY help from FEMA or any other agency for at least 72 hours.

You need 3 days of supplies. The most important of which is drinking water. 1.5Gal of potable water per person, per 24 hours. Diarrhea can induce dehydration, hence there's no such thing as extra water.

You may be without electricity and without means to realistically create a working fire pit to cook on. With that in mind, you need to have 3 days of food that does not need to be cooked. Canned foods usually do not need to be cooked, but may need to be diluted with your drinking water -- so keep that in mind when determining how much water to get.

Wool is the only common material that stays warm EVEN WHEN WET. I would recommend a wool blanket and/or clothing/socks. Do not think that because you're in a tropical climate that it will not get cold. When you're wet, you're always cold.

You may have to deal with panicking locals. In that event, carry a firearm if possible. Otherwise, implement a weapon of some sort. This is of least importance, despite what some people may think.

Carry a knife on you at all times. It's not only for defense, but in an emergency, the necessity to cut things tends to come up quite a bit.
2012-12-03 11:25:33 AM  
2 votes:
Stand with your back towards the wind if you have to piddle in your yard.
2012-12-03 07:21:01 PM  
1 vote:
Typhoons are easy. Preparation is the key.

1. Live in a concrete house. Don't live in a wooden house. If you're not in a concrete house, you're farked. Go to a shelter and disregard the rest of this post if you're too dumb to live in a concrete house.
2. Your power should be provided via underground lines. Power lines are bound to fail, either because they snapped or the poles fell and the wires snapped.
3. Fill up your tub with water. This is how you will bathe and and flush your toilet if you couldn't get a place to live that had proper underground power lines. Power runs the water pumps, so if the power to the substation goes, you're out of water too.
4. Buy several 5 gallon bottles of water and a hand pump.
5. Buy batteries for your flashlight. Buy a goddamned flashlight if you don't have one.
6. Put boards on the outside of your windows. You have hooks above and below the window to attach boards, right? You're not going to get nails to hold boards in concrete very long.
7. Get snacks. Lots of snacks.
8. Don't run your generator unless the power goes out, and only run it outside. People die because they run their generator indoors. Probably for the best, genetically-speaking.
9. Charge your iPhone
10. Gas your car
11. Get some buckets to catch any leaky spots in the ceiling
12. Get some rags ready to soak up water seeping in under doors. Don't worry about replacing them throughout the storm, once they are saturated, they'll become nice little dams.

Pretty simple.
2012-12-03 06:25:36 PM  
1 vote:
Find a cement apartment building and hang out in the stair well above the fifth floor. Watch the show for as long as it's safe though, the higher off the ground the better, because you'll have some great stories to tell.

Survived Iniki, my second of three hurricanes and that was only a cat 4. Watching a washing machine (I think) fly by the window, 7th floor, isn't something I saw every day. Watching a car float into the side of an apartment building is surreal. Watching trees become projectiles got me into the stair well.

Stockpile essentials. Don't expect power for a while...or police.
2012-12-03 02:28:36 PM  
1 vote:
The producers for preparing for a typhoon are exactly the same as preparing for a hurricane. There's a lot of things to get done including preparing your house (boarding windows and doors), stocking up on non-perishable food, flashlights and batteries, candles/lanterns, getting tarps (and even tents), BBQ grill, camp stove, a battery powered radio, filling the bathtub with water (for drinking), gassing up the car and putting it in a shelter on high ground, etc., etc., etc. There are a lot of good guides on the net. But if this storm is going to hit tomorrow and you haven't started these preparations, you probably do not have time.
2012-12-03 02:17:45 PM  
1 vote:
Water
Cash
Can food
Propane
Gasoline
radio
flash light
Lots of batteries
Move out of low laying areas and areas prone to landslides
Move outdoor items inside
Board up windows or at least duct tape them in a X on the inside.
Get some books to read and board games to play if you are not alone.
expect a full day of stormy weather
Do not go outside for any reason until it has passed
2012-12-03 02:16:25 PM  
1 vote:
everyone is mentioning charge your batteries and have gas to charge your devices. but, don't expect your cell phone or other devices to work. it doesn't take a massive storm to knock out a cell tower, in which case, you're fully charged phone will be useless.

/ just make a plan that expects everything possible to fail, not only in your home but in your society/infrastructure. rarely will everything fail, but you never know precisely which things will fail. at this point you want to rely on nothing save your non-perishable food goods, your many gallons of water, the bath tub full of water so you can flush the toilet... oh yeah, and a lot of people forget to get enough toilet paper.
// and don't ever approach downed power lines. don't drive in moving water... a very low level of water is enough to wash a car away (it's also very difficult to gauge the depth of the water)
2012-12-03 02:14:27 PM  
1 vote:
You guys DO realize this is in the Philippines, not the US or any of its territories, right?
Subby:
Find some locals there that are non-religious, level-headed, and cautious what the best course of action is. They will better be able to explain areas that are prone to flooding, wind damage, etc.
This is a serious storm and should not be taken lightly. If your area goes under evacuation warning, I would high tail it out of there. I don't know what sort of structure you are living in, but as another farker recommended, if it is not extremely well built: leave. It is not worth risking your life.
Stock up on gasoline, non-perishable food (MREs keep really well, even if the area becomes flooded they are still able to be eaten), propane or any gas used for grilling/cooking out doors, generator (if possible), handheld radio preferably the kind that use a crank to generate power, and bottle/jugs of water are crucial. Remember, the human body cannot live for very long without fresh water. If things are getting really bad, fill up ALL tubs and sinks in the house with fresh water. That way, should you run out of water for an extended period of time, you have a source to drink from. You can also drink from the TANK on the toilet as that is freshwater (NOT THE BOWL OR YOU MAY GET VERY SICK). If your house/structure floods, DO NOT DRINK ANY WATER THAT IS UNSEALED. Avoid ALL floodwater and seek high ground as the floodwater carries loads of bacteria and can make you very, very sick. Stay tuned into local broadcasts for possible evacuation orders.
2012-12-03 02:09:35 PM  
1 vote:
Lived through a ton of typhoons growing up. Preparation specifics are all dependent on where you live and what the infrastructure is like. But in general:

1) Stock up on food and water. Don't forget a can opener.
2) Board the windows. I don't care if you have the typhoon proof/bullet proof windows. I've seen them break, I've seen whole window fixtures blow in.
3) stock up on batteries to power any radios, flashlights, lamps, etc.
4) have something to do if you suspect power will be out for awhile. books, crosswords, hand held game devices etc. It can get really boring on the second day of a typhoon if you cant leave the house and are just sitting around in the dark.
5) Secure anything around your home that might shift in high winds, including boats, motorcycles, outdoor furniture etc.
6) Bring the pets in if you have any.
7) Fill the bathtubs and use that water to flush toilets.
8) Stay calm and be safe.
2012-12-03 02:06:24 PM  
1 vote:
1. Emergency supplies etc...
2. Board games / candles / wine / friends
3. Fill up all your vehicles (so you can use them to charge your electronics if need

** I grew up in hurricane area and depending on the severity of destruction and limited goods available cigarettes and steaks are the best bartering tokens. Also, minimize opening your refrigerator if the electricity goes out.
2012-12-03 02:05:46 PM  
1 vote:
Is this "5" similar (or the same) as a cat 5 hurricane?  If so, you need to evacuate.  That is all.
 
I understand that may be difficult this far out, as you're on an island.
 
If you must stay, the obvious stuff has been covered.  But:
 
Make sure you have as much medication (if you're perscribed anything) as legally possible.  (Like, if you're on Xanax here in the States, you can only have one month's supply.)
 
Not the most critical thing, but a battery operated fan or two.
2012-12-03 02:00:25 PM  
1 vote:
Set up a webcam for us to watch until the internet or power goes out.
2012-12-03 01:53:06 PM  
1 vote:

rooftop235: Floridian here.
1) LED flashlights, fresh batteries. Weather radio or regular radio.
2) Spare power source for cellphone.
3) Do all laundry, and wash all dishes. Then shower right before the storm. Shut off gas or electric water heater and close inlet (some will allow drainage via spigot at bottom of unit. Get a bunch of drinking water in bottles and such. Keep bathtub water for flushing toilet and light bathing if needed.
4) Prepare a cooler with sandwiches, lots of ice, and stuff you would like to save from your fridge. I also kept a bunch of 2-liter bottles of ice in the freezer and that worked pretty well. Just don't fill them ALL the way up before freezing. Keep a small grill, charcoal, and fluid handy. Be responsible about grilling (don't be an r-tard). kool-aid mix goes a long way as well. hand cranked CAN OPENER!
5) Have grass, cash, and gas handy. Beer can be used with - or substituted for - grass. Cash is handy, gas goes in the car.
6) Disposable camera, and maybe a digital camera so that you can document the events. Makes for fun.
7) Board games or playing cards. CoD won't work when there is no electric.
8) A boat. You might need one.
9) If you have the luxury then have a gun, small generator (around 3500w max will do quite well), window fan or small window A/C, and small TV. I did this during Francis and Jean and it worked out great. Only used about 4 gallons of gas/day total. Being efficient keeps you from having to sit in long lines waiting for gas.

/hope this helps


OR you could book a room in Atlanta.
2012-12-03 01:50:30 PM  
1 vote:
Floridian here.
1) LED flashlights, fresh batteries. Weather radio or regular radio.
2) Spare power source for cellphone.
3) Do all laundry, and wash all dishes. Then shower right before the storm. Shut off gas or electric water heater and close inlet (some will allow drainage via spigot at bottom of unit. Get a bunch of drinking water in bottles and such. Keep bathtub water for flushing toilet and light bathing if needed.
4) Prepare a cooler with sandwiches, lots of ice, and stuff you would like to save from your fridge. I also kept a bunch of 2-liter bottles of ice in the freezer and that worked pretty well. Just don't fill them ALL the way up before freezing. Keep a small grill, charcoal, and fluid handy. Be responsible about grilling (don't be an r-tard). kool-aid mix goes a long way as well. hand cranked CAN OPENER!
5) Have grass, cash, and gas handy. Beer can be used with - or substituted for - grass. Cash is handy, gas goes in the car.
6) Disposable camera, and maybe a digital camera so that you can document the events. Makes for fun.
7) Board games or playing cards. CoD won't work when there is no electric.
8) A boat. You might need one.
9) If you have the luxury then have a gun, small generator (around 3500w max will do quite well), window fan or small window A/C, and small TV. I did this during Francis and Jean and it worked out great. Only used about 4 gallons of gas/day total. Being efficient keeps you from having to sit in long lines waiting for gas.

/hope this helps
2012-12-03 01:46:03 PM  
1 vote:
And remember, "It's not THAT the wind is blowing. It's WHAT the wind is blowing."

Don't go out in the wind.
2012-12-03 01:45:27 PM  
1 vote:
It's not that the wind is a bloin...it's WHAT the wind is a bloin
2012-12-03 01:41:40 PM  
1 vote:
This is a Cat 5 storm. Find a VERY heavily reinforced concrete building.
2012-12-03 01:37:59 PM  
1 vote:
Drink lots of fluids and eat your green veggies.

Ask your doctor about getting a prescription to an antibiotic, such as Ciprofloxacin (or a Ceftriaxone injection if you are pregnant).
2012-12-03 01:18:45 PM  
1 vote:
My advise to you is you drink heavily.
2012-12-03 01:18:16 PM  
1 vote:
Fill up your bathtub for sanitation water, bucket flush the toilet. Your water heater, if you have one, is a 40 gallon storage tank; shut off the power to it and close the inlet valve to protect it from contamination. Cigarettes are currency.
2012-12-03 01:04:47 PM  
1 vote:
if you have a car, fill on gas and a dc converter- mobility and a generator.

acquire a cheap solar cell. the car will be for quick charging, solar cell more of a passive charger.

get a few rechargeable batteries, and a flashlight as well as a radio that uses rechargeables.

i wouldn't worry too much about a cell phone; if the typhoon's strong enough, the local towers will be knocked out.

if you have a bathtub, fill it with water. this is sanitation water, not drinking (toilet/laundry, if someone gets hurt, et cetera)

some sort of feul outside of your vehicle- for cooking as well (charcaol, wood, petrol based)

have a shovel, it has many uses (mainly digging pits (makeshift toilet/cooking pit), but also can be used as an anti zombie device)

double plus on the knife, if you can something like a leatherman or a gerber (utiltiy knife)
2012-12-03 12:58:29 PM  
1 vote:
Well, first check that the turbo bearings aren't cooked... and realize that GM electronics of the era suck and probably need attention. Watch out for the front half-shafts, they are notoriously weak. Otherwise, enjoy your Q-ship, they are murder in a straight line!
2012-12-03 12:56:57 PM  
1 vote:
Typhoon Party!!
2012-12-03 12:51:48 PM  
1 vote:

Savage Bacon: [supernaturaladdicted.weebly.com image 250x291]

"You hoard toilet paper. You understand me? Hoard it. Hoard it like it's made of gold. Because it is."

/hot like Ruby


LOTS AND LOTS OF THIS!

and have plenty of dry undies and socks... pack'em in zip lock bags... no, not that kind.. the good stuff.

you don't want stuff getting fungus-y and fall off...
2012-12-03 12:49:37 PM  
1 vote:
Ahhh, yes, I endured many typhoons in my youth when I lived in the Philippines. Typhoon Yoling went right through Manila, didn't get power back for three weeks.

Store up PLENTY of clean water. Mosquito netting so you can spend hot nights outside. Candles, some food, really don't need a lot....batteries for the radio, gas in the car/motorcycle if ya got one....weapons if you can, to defend against robbers/looters...eat all your refridgerated stuff, 'cause it's gone, man, you ain't gonna see power for a while...

Third world countries have a tough time coping with disasters.
2012-12-03 12:45:40 PM  
1 vote:
Adding to my initial list:

You may need means to signaling and communication. Do not expect your cell phone to work during a civil emergency. If you do not have an amateur radio license or any training in that field, your means of radio communication are nil. But, you can still use chemical light sticks (glo-sticks) to signal for help.

Road flares, chemical light sticks (glow sticks/glo-sticks) and hand-mirrors (for daytime) signaling.

Keep a very loud whistle on you at all times. If the structure you are in collapses, yelling may not be possible, but if you're breathing, you can blow the whistle. Plus, if you're injured, the last thing you need to do is yell.

Because it is a typhoon, you will need means of flotation. You may be able to swim well, but you can't do it forever and you may need to help others. A simple life vest may suffice, but I would recommend having several of them on-hand in case they're needed by others. Trust me, when YOU are doing well, others around you will either swarm to you, or you will want to help them.
2012-12-03 12:38:02 PM  
1 vote:
Get an LED flashlight or lantern; one set of batteries should be plenty for this storm. (You can get more later.)

Charge your mobile phone and any other devices.

Fill containers with drinking water.

Do laundry NOW.
2012-12-03 12:37:06 PM  
1 vote:
this will give you a basic overview. You'll want to contact Eurofighter for more specs on what everything needs to be during the rebuild.

Here's another basic image of what you're in for:

www.mediastorehouse.com

Let me know how it turns out! I hear they're a blast to fly!

\I'd follow hurricane rules: hide from wind, run from water
\\be safe out there
2012-12-03 12:32:15 PM  
1 vote:

I'm an excellent driver: Make sure Chris Christie is running your State...


and Blanco isn't
2012-12-03 12:31:24 PM  
1 vote:
All power will be out. Go get as much cash as possible as ATMs/credit cards will be useless for a while.
2012-12-03 12:31:12 PM  
1 vote:
Make sure it's hooked up to the internet so you can read Fark, the scan takes forever.

depts.washington.edu
2012-12-03 12:30:43 PM  
1 vote:
Make sure Chris Christie is running your State...
2012-12-03 12:27:18 PM  
1 vote:
Spin in the opposite direction.

/seriously, ask the locals, stay safe.
 
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