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(Fark)   Subby's going through his first typhoon tomorrow, Typhoon Bopha (aka Pablo). Needs advice   (fark.com) divider line 176
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1578 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Dec 2012 at 12:26 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-12-03 01:02:37 PM  
Vote Republican and blame it on them.
 
2012-12-03 01:03:22 PM  
Booze, snacks, lube, charcoal, extra booze..

That should cover it.
 
2012-12-03 01:04:05 PM  
i want you to get together all the hottest flip girls and send them to me. ill protect them thru all this.

let the fob's fight off the storm
 
2012-12-03 01:04:18 PM  

ChipNASA: Where are you?
Lived in Okinawa for quite a few years.
/no biggie....the Okinawans walked around with Umbrellas while we were all "EVACUATE!!!"


Pulled into Guam just after a super typhoon hit, saw a tugboat from the harbor sitting in the middle of a road. A friend of mine was there on a ship that couldn't get underway to avoid the storm, so they moored to the pier with double steel wire moorings. When the storm cleared they were aground on the far side of the harbor. Also found out why the base housing was built with re-bar reinforced poured concrete walls.

/beautiful place
//wouldn't want to be there for a typhoon
 
2012-12-03 01:04:47 PM  
if you have a car, fill on gas and a dc converter- mobility and a generator.

acquire a cheap solar cell. the car will be for quick charging, solar cell more of a passive charger.

get a few rechargeable batteries, and a flashlight as well as a radio that uses rechargeables.

i wouldn't worry too much about a cell phone; if the typhoon's strong enough, the local towers will be knocked out.

if you have a bathtub, fill it with water. this is sanitation water, not drinking (toilet/laundry, if someone gets hurt, et cetera)

some sort of feul outside of your vehicle- for cooking as well (charcaol, wood, petrol based)

have a shovel, it has many uses (mainly digging pits (makeshift toilet/cooking pit), but also can be used as an anti zombie device)

double plus on the knife, if you can something like a leatherman or a gerber (utiltiy knife)
 
2012-12-03 01:05:28 PM  
It may be your first typhoon, subby, but it's probably not the first typhoon to hit where you're now living. Find some rational, non-religious, long time locals whom you can trust. They will be able to give you the best information: things like which way the water will flow, places to avoid, where shelters may be located and I'm sure a number of things dumbasses have done in the past that you'll not want to do...
 
2012-12-03 01:06:40 PM  

Gleeman: ChipNASA: Where are you?
Lived in Okinawa for quite a few years.
/no biggie....the Okinawans walked around with Umbrellas while we were all "EVACUATE!!!"

Pulled into Guam just after a super typhoon hit, saw a tugboat from the harbor sitting in the middle of a road. A friend of mine was there on a ship that couldn't get underway to avoid the storm, so they moored to the pier with double steel wire moorings. When the storm cleared they were aground on the far side of the harbor. Also found out why the base housing was built with re-bar reinforced poured concrete walls.

/beautiful place
//wouldn't want to be there for a typhoon


We had the same typhoon hit us twicein 96 hours.....
Sandbags.....
MRE
LOTS and LOTS of BOOZE!!!
 
2012-12-03 01:08:14 PM  
A good towel.
 
2012-12-03 01:10:36 PM  
For some reason I first read the headline as "Subby's going on his honeymoon tomorrow and needs advice". So, maybe the advice would be the same.
 
2012-12-03 01:13:17 PM  

eltejon: A good towel.

this.

don't forget your towel.
 
2012-12-03 01:14:29 PM  
www.onlineworldofwrestling.com

Just run from him, he don't look fast
 
2012-12-03 01:15:10 PM  
Beer
 
2012-12-03 01:16:14 PM  

Gleeman: Pulled into Guam just after a super typhoon hit


We lived 2 years on Guam back in early 90s. We went through 8 typhoons. My advice is mainly the water, garbage pails, bathtubs, whatever you have, fill it. Next up would be the sandbags on the doors. Yes, it stops the doors blowing away I guess, but have your bucket and mop handy, because all you will be doing the next 12-24 hours is mopping water up that leaks through. They should come around with water buffalos to give you drinking water, so I wouldn't worry too much about that. but the toilet will need it most. Remember: If it's brown, flush it down, if it's yellow, let it mellow! good luck!

/oh, we had landlines for 3 days after, because of battery backups. Again this was back in 92-93.
//if you can afford it, stay in a ritzy hotel. They always have power backups, and you'll be livin large.
///again, good luck!
 
2012-12-03 01:16:24 PM  
Buy a plunger before you need a plunger.
 
2012-12-03 01:18:16 PM  
Fill up your bathtub for sanitation water, bucket flush the toilet. Your water heater, if you have one, is a 40 gallon storage tank; shut off the power to it and close the inlet valve to protect it from contamination. Cigarettes are currency.
 
2012-12-03 01:18:45 PM  
My advise to you is you drink heavily.
 
2012-12-03 01:19:21 PM  

ChipNASA: Where are you?
Lived in Okinawa for quite a few years.
/no biggie....the Okinawans walked around with Umbrellas while we were all "EVACUATE!!!"


Where at in Oki? I was on Futenma and Kinser for a couple of years.
 
2012-12-03 01:21:07 PM  
Well, if you're in San Francisco, then, goodbye.
 
2012-12-03 01:24:03 PM  
a.k.a. Pablo?

img835.imageshack.us
 
2012-12-03 01:26:58 PM  
Drunk people tend to bounce off things without injury a lot better than sober people.

"Nuff said
 
2012-12-03 01:27:26 PM  
Throw all you poolside furniture into the pool.
 
2012-12-03 01:29:35 PM  

dprathbun: Throw all you poolside furniture into the pool.


Then throw yourself into the pool.
 
2012-12-03 01:31:48 PM  

Deep Contact: dprathbun: Throw all you poolside furniture into the pool.

Then throw yourself into the pool.


Touche.
 
2012-12-03 01:37:59 PM  
Drink lots of fluids and eat your green veggies.

Ask your doctor about getting a prescription to an antibiotic, such as Ciprofloxacin (or a Ceftriaxone injection if you are pregnant).
 
2012-12-03 01:40:00 PM  
Don't get so very scared.
 
2012-12-03 01:41:40 PM  
This is a Cat 5 storm. Find a VERY heavily reinforced concrete building.
 
2012-12-03 01:44:17 PM  
1 oz vodka
1/4 oz grenadine syrup
1 oz gin
1 oz light rum
1/2 oz Bacardi® 151 rum
1 oz amaretto almond liqueur
1 oz triple sec
grapefruit juice
pineapple juice

Pour all but the juices, in order listed, into a hurricane glass three-quarters filled with ice. Fill with equal parts of grapefruit and pineapple juice, and serve.

Because it is a CAT 5 and you will not make it if you don't evacuate.
 
2012-12-03 01:44:39 PM  
Lives on Guam for a bit and iD10ts has the best advice. I would also stock up on food, liqueur Candles and have a couple friends over. Play games... Seriously it can be a good time. For the water get a new Rubbermaid garbage can.. Like yard sized and fill with water for your supply when the aquafina runs out
 
2012-12-03 01:45:27 PM  
It's not that the wind is a bloin...it's WHAT the wind is a bloin
 
2012-12-03 01:45:33 PM  
DON'T!


you'll thank me later.
 
2012-12-03 01:45:46 PM  
Yup

i.qkme.me
 
2012-12-03 01:46:03 PM  
And remember, "It's not THAT the wind is blowing. It's WHAT the wind is blowing."

Don't go out in the wind.
 
2012-12-03 01:46:49 PM  

catdaddywest: Cash. Lots of ice and lots and lots of beer.


I see the important parts are covered. Add to that list: fill propane tank and buy food.
 
2012-12-03 01:47:17 PM  

Ben Enya: It's not that the wind is a bloin...it's WHAT the wind is a bloin


DAMN!

Knew I shouldn't have taken the time to read the thread.
 
2012-12-03 01:49:31 PM  

cduke23: ChipNASA: Where are you?
Lived in Okinawa for quite a few years.
/no biggie....the Okinawans walked around with Umbrellas while we were all "EVACUATE!!!"

Where at in Oki? I was on Futenma and Kinser for a couple of years.


Kadena, 1984 1986...
 
2012-12-03 01:50:30 PM  
Floridian here.
1) LED flashlights, fresh batteries. Weather radio or regular radio.
2) Spare power source for cellphone.
3) Do all laundry, and wash all dishes. Then shower right before the storm. Shut off gas or electric water heater and close inlet (some will allow drainage via spigot at bottom of unit. Get a bunch of drinking water in bottles and such. Keep bathtub water for flushing toilet and light bathing if needed.
4) Prepare a cooler with sandwiches, lots of ice, and stuff you would like to save from your fridge. I also kept a bunch of 2-liter bottles of ice in the freezer and that worked pretty well. Just don't fill them ALL the way up before freezing. Keep a small grill, charcoal, and fluid handy. Be responsible about grilling (don't be an r-tard). kool-aid mix goes a long way as well. hand cranked CAN OPENER!
5) Have grass, cash, and gas handy. Beer can be used with - or substituted for - grass. Cash is handy, gas goes in the car.
6) Disposable camera, and maybe a digital camera so that you can document the events. Makes for fun.
7) Board games or playing cards. CoD won't work when there is no electric.
8) A boat. You might need one.
9) If you have the luxury then have a gun, small generator (around 3500w max will do quite well), window fan or small window A/C, and small TV. I did this during Francis and Jean and it worked out great. Only used about 4 gallons of gas/day total. Being efficient keeps you from having to sit in long lines waiting for gas.

/hope this helps
 
2012-12-03 01:50:38 PM  
I guess I'll throw this out here. I've been through the eye of 1 hurricane and within 50 miles of the eye of 3 others. Plus more times than I can remember for outer rain bands and effects of other hurricanes/ tropical storms.

1. At the start of hurricane season - I check my generator (bought a used one for $60 off season that can run my fridge and a fan / window AC - and it has for 5 days before) and grab some 5 gallon bottles of water. You want to go off the plan of 1 gallon per person per day. Plan for a week. You probably won't need that much, but it's better to have too much than not enough. I check my flashlight batteries and candle supply. I get some extras of both and stash them as I'm sure my kid will find some of the flashlights and kill the batteries during the season. I also check out my first aid kit and have a police scanner.

Also, check the trees around your house. If any look like they're dead or rotting, or if you have some limbs going over your house then trim them. Do it before the storm is coming.

if you're in a new or unfamiliar area, ask the people who've been there for a while about flooding. You're just trying to figure out places that have creeks/rivers that can flood or areas where ponding is already a problem. Avoid those areas during a hurricane.

I also check my ammo. During the last couple of hurricanes the police scanner was full of some pretty nasty stuff going down. Plus I know people who've had to draw (but never fired) to protect themselves from looters (a generator in a world without power is a noisy beacon). If you do have to draw, even if nothing happens you have to call the police immediately Don't try to be Rambo or John Wayne. But it is something that's better to have and not need than to need and not have. It's not going to be a full on state of anarchy and you'll find most people banding together to help each other, but there are also opportunists who will try to take advantage of the situation. And remember, if you have to pull it out in defense, you're also pulling out your check book for a lawyer.

2. if a storm is within 5 days of possible landfall at my location I start filling my wife's car and my truck up at 3/4 of a tank instead of letting it get down to the usual nothing. I also go grocery shopping and plan on a week of can stores following the storm. I only get stuff I don't mind eating if the storm doesn't come this way. I also filly my 5 gallon gas cans up. I check my flashlights and candle supply.

3. If a storm is within 3 days of landing then I start paying attention to storm surge and wind information. If the winds are under 100 mph and / or you're over 30 - 40 miles inland you should be pretty much OK in newer structures. if they're over 100 mph you might want to look into a shelter or a newer structure to stay in. Hopefully the area you're in has building standards that require the use of hurricane straps during construction.

If you don't know, put you're head in the attic and see if you see any of these:

shop1.mailordercentral.com

if you don't, then you're house can have the roof blow off in high winds. I wouldn't stay in a place like that with any hurricane force winds. It may be safe, but if you can be cautious why not be.

4. At 48 hours it's time to decide to evacuate. Run from water, hide from wind. That means if you're in a flood prone area, you should look at evacuating. Also pay attention as the media will be going crazy about it. If you start seeing out of area news crews you may want to leave. Pay attention to authorities as well. If they're begging you to leave or asking you to put a toe tag on say they can identify the body, you may want to leave.

If you're not leaving and you're going to hide from the wind, then it's time to board up. Get some 3/4" plywood and screw them to the window frame. However, doing this is up to you. I don't board my house up as it's new enough and I'm far enough inland that it shouldn't be a problem.

This is also when you double check everything that's before this. You'll also want to get at least a few hundred dollars in cash.

5. At 24 hours it's time to take it easy. You don't go to work. You don't do much. I usually do some online gaming as it may be a while before I get to do that again. Make sure all of your cell phones are charged up. I usually plugged in until the power goes out. We only eat things that are in the fridge.

6. During the storm just stay in and relax. The power will probably go out. You will probably hear some transformers exploding and power lines arcing. The wind gets really loud and it rains a lot. Keep an eye out at least every 30 - 60 minutes to check to make sure you're not getting flooded. Don't try to drive around. Depending on the size and speed of the storm it may be over in anywhere from 8 to 24 hours.

If you start to see it flooding you can either try to ride out the flooding if you don't think it'll be that bad or call the authorities for a rescue. But the odds of a rescue during a storm are pretty low. That's why the decision to evacuate early on is so important.

7. After the storm for me it's just been a matter of hanging out for a while. Read a book. Play board / card games with your neighbors. Conserve gas as it may be a while before you can get more.

After Ike I wouldn't go back to work until they got a fuel truck there and had gas to give back to me for driving up there. Don't go driving around gawking at the damage.

The longest I've gone without power was 8 days Rita. But I knew someone that had power so I stayed with them. But during Ike it was only 2 days. During that time I just hung out and cleaned. You'll figure out stuff to do to keep busy.

if your house was damaged then FEMA sets up these locations that you can go to that also have appraisers on hand from the major insurance carriers for the area. During Ike they had them at the Lowes and Home Depots parking lots. It's a nice 1 stop streamlined process to get the ball rolling on repairs. If your house in uninhabitable FEMA was also picking up the tab on hotels. Believe it or not, during a major event like this FEMA is somewhat useful. I've hear horror stories from people who were in NO after Katrina, but they've definitely gotten their shiat together since then.

After that life slowly returns to normal. About 2 weeks after fuel supplies are coming in to the point that most gas stations are open and the power's generally back on. if your house has damage the insurance appraiser has been by and an initial work crew has come to make it habitable until you can get it repaired. You may have to fight with the insurance company on the amounts for months afterward, but you're not homeless. After a month to 6 weeks it's pretty much business as usual.

I hope this helps someone a little bit. I know it's rambling and a lot of stuff, but it's what I've learned. Take what you want from it, but I'm just throwing it out as some help from someone who's been there.
 
2012-12-03 01:52:14 PM  
OH, Cat-5 storm. GTFO. That is all. Just go.
 
2012-12-03 01:53:06 PM  

rooftop235: Floridian here.
1) LED flashlights, fresh batteries. Weather radio or regular radio.
2) Spare power source for cellphone.
3) Do all laundry, and wash all dishes. Then shower right before the storm. Shut off gas or electric water heater and close inlet (some will allow drainage via spigot at bottom of unit. Get a bunch of drinking water in bottles and such. Keep bathtub water for flushing toilet and light bathing if needed.
4) Prepare a cooler with sandwiches, lots of ice, and stuff you would like to save from your fridge. I also kept a bunch of 2-liter bottles of ice in the freezer and that worked pretty well. Just don't fill them ALL the way up before freezing. Keep a small grill, charcoal, and fluid handy. Be responsible about grilling (don't be an r-tard). kool-aid mix goes a long way as well. hand cranked CAN OPENER!
5) Have grass, cash, and gas handy. Beer can be used with - or substituted for - grass. Cash is handy, gas goes in the car.
6) Disposable camera, and maybe a digital camera so that you can document the events. Makes for fun.
7) Board games or playing cards. CoD won't work when there is no electric.
8) A boat. You might need one.
9) If you have the luxury then have a gun, small generator (around 3500w max will do quite well), window fan or small window A/C, and small TV. I did this during Francis and Jean and it worked out great. Only used about 4 gallons of gas/day total. Being efficient keeps you from having to sit in long lines waiting for gas.

/hope this helps


OR you could book a room in Atlanta.
 
2012-12-03 01:54:23 PM  
Call your weed guy BEFORE you run out!
 
2012-12-03 01:57:08 PM  

chuckufarlie: rooftop235: Floridian here.
1) LED flashlights, fresh batteries. Weather radio or regular radio.
2) Spare power source for cellphone.
3) Do all laundry, and wash all dishes. Then shower right before the storm. Shut off gas or electric water heater and close inlet (some will allow drainage via spigot at bottom of unit. Get a bunch of drinking water in bottles and such. Keep bathtub water for flushing toilet and light bathing if needed.
4) Prepare a cooler with sandwiches, lots of ice, and stuff you would like to save from your fridge. I also kept a bunch of 2-liter bottles of ice in the freezer and that worked pretty well. Just don't fill them ALL the way up before freezing. Keep a small grill, charcoal, and fluid handy. Be responsible about grilling (don't be an r-tard). kool-aid mix goes a long way as well. hand cranked CAN OPENER!
5) Have grass, cash, and gas handy. Beer can be used with - or substituted for - grass. Cash is handy, gas goes in the car.
6) Disposable camera, and maybe a digital camera so that you can document the events. Makes for fun.
7) Board games or playing cards. CoD won't work when there is no electric.
8) A boat. You might need one.
9) If you have the luxury then have a gun, small generator (around 3500w max will do quite well), window fan or small window A/C, and small TV. I did this during Francis and Jean and it worked out great. Only used about 4 gallons of gas/day total. Being efficient keeps you from having to sit in long lines waiting for gas.

/hope this helps

OR you could book a room in Atlanta.


In which case you will definitely need the gun.
 
2012-12-03 01:57:31 PM  
I used to live in southern Louisiana. The day before a hurricane hit, we'd go to Grand Island and play in the really fun waves. Then we'd drive home and ride out eh storm. The day after the storm, we'd go inland a bit and go tubing down the raging torrents of the local smaller rivers. Yes, some moron would actually rent us tubes! Good times. Good times.

My advice to you? Surfboard.
 
2012-12-03 01:59:47 PM  
Duck and cover.

/works against nuclear bombs too
 
2012-12-03 02:00:03 PM  
1. Keep your pants on while sitting in slatted chairs.

2. Make sure you have a large plastic tub handy for gathering beers after the storm passes.

3. Stay away from patio furniture. It has a tendency to tip over during sever storm events.
 
2012-12-03 02:00:25 PM  
Set up a webcam for us to watch until the internet or power goes out.
 
2012-12-03 02:01:24 PM  

rooftop235: chuckufarlie: rooftop235: Floridian here.
1) LED flashlights, fresh batteries. Weather radio or regular radio.
2) Spare power source for cellphone.
3) Do all laundry, and wash all dishes. Then shower right before the storm. Shut off gas or electric water heater and close inlet (some will allow drainage via spigot at bottom of unit. Get a bunch of drinking water in bottles and such. Keep bathtub water for flushing toilet and light bathing if needed.
4) Prepare a cooler with sandwiches, lots of ice, and stuff you would like to save from your fridge. I also kept a bunch of 2-liter bottles of ice in the freezer and that worked pretty well. Just don't fill them ALL the way up before freezing. Keep a small grill, charcoal, and fluid handy. Be responsible about grilling (don't be an r-tard). kool-aid mix goes a long way as well. hand cranked CAN OPENER!
5) Have grass, cash, and gas handy. Beer can be used with - or substituted for - grass. Cash is handy, gas goes in the car.
6) Disposable camera, and maybe a digital camera so that you can document the events. Makes for fun.
7) Board games or playing cards. CoD won't work when there is no electric.
8) A boat. You might need one.
9) If you have the luxury then have a gun, small generator (around 3500w max will do quite well), window fan or small window A/C, and small TV. I did this during Francis and Jean and it worked out great. Only used about 4 gallons of gas/day total. Being efficient keeps you from having to sit in long lines waiting for gas.

/hope this helps

OR you could book a room in Atlanta.

In which case you will definitely need the gun.


you are going to the wrong part of Atlanta. But then again, you hang around the house waiting for hurricanes to come by.
 
2012-12-03 02:02:15 PM  
Our routine is to clean the carburetor on the generator, get an extra tank of propane for the grill, tie the boat to a light pole using a very long lead and a slip hitch, take the strap off the boat trailer so the boat can elevate if necessary, and then start planning the party. But we live in south Louisiana. We are professionals.
 
2012-12-03 02:04:10 PM  
I've seen about 40 of these bad boys come through Kodiak. Best advice is don't walk the dog in the middle of it. Winter typhoons are frigging cold
 
2012-12-03 02:04:33 PM  
Be as mysterious as the dark side of the moon.
 
2012-12-03 02:05:46 PM  
Is this "5" similar (or the same) as a cat 5 hurricane?  If so, you need to evacuate.  That is all.
 
I understand that may be difficult this far out, as you're on an island.
 
If you must stay, the obvious stuff has been covered.  But:
 
Make sure you have as much medication (if you're perscribed anything) as legally possible.  (Like, if you're on Xanax here in the States, you can only have one month's supply.)
 
Not the most critical thing, but a battery operated fan or two.
 
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